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Berkeleybee
03-02-2006, 08:27 PM
All,

We do need to get pertinent articles together in one place. One thing to do is to use this as a breaking news thread. It would be great if we had a volunteer who kept track of news articles and saved them somewhere.

best,
Berkeleybee

Starting us off with an editorial in the NYT, not on us, but a related topic.



***********************
Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company
The New York Times

March 1, 2006 Wednesday
Late Edition - Final

SECTION: Section A; Column 1; Editorial Desk; Pg. 18

LENGTH: 414 words

HEADLINE: Computing Error

BODY:


The outsourcing of computing work overseas may not be as bad as you think. In fact, it probably isn't bad at all. Consider one recent study that says the problem isn't so much the competition from high-tech workers in places as far-flung as India and Romania as it is the discouragement caused by the doomsayers themselves.

The Association for Computing Machinery, the professional organization that issued the report, says that there are more information technology jobs today than at the height of the dot-com boom. While 2 to 3 percent of American jobs in the field migrate to other nations each year, new jobs have thus far more than made up for the loss.

Think of the local companies that service people's home computers in towns all over America, the way mechanics have long worked under the hoods of our cars. When three people start a company, it attracts no fanfare, but put such companies all together and there is a big effect in aggregate. The Small Business Administration says that those smaller enterprises provide around 75 percent of the net new jobs added to the economy.

And when a big company slowly adds workers to a new division because, say, the middle class in India is buying more high-priced gadgets, the move garners little attention. Globalization advocates have long contended that everyone benefits from greater growth worldwide.

That picture, of course, stands in contrast with the more familiar gloomy depiction of runaway outsourcing. Perhaps that explains what the report says is declining interest in computer science among American college students. Students may think, Why bother if all the jobs are in India? But the computer sector is booming, while the number of students interested in going into the field is falling.

The industry isn't gone, but it will be if we don't start generating the necessary dynamic work force. The association says that higher-end technology jobs -- like those in research -- are beginning to go overseas and that policies to ''attract, educate and retain the best I.T. talent are critical'' to future success. Given the post 9/11 approach to immigration and the state of math and science education in America, that is hardly encouraging.

Information technology jobs won't go away unless we let them. Computing in the past five years has become, according to the report, ''a truly global industry.'' In the next few years, jobs won't just land in our laps. We have nothing to fear but the fear of competing itself.

arihant
03-03-2006, 06:55 PM
http://money.cnn.com/2006/02/23/news/economy/jobs_it_offshoring/index.htm?cnn=yes

Study says U.S. tech hiring grows
Trade group reports that domestic increase in technology jobs offsets the work being sent overseas.
February 23, 2006: 8:19 AM EST


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) - Demand for technology workers in the United States continues to grow in spite of American companies shifting more technology work overseas, according to a new study.

The Association for Computing Machinery, a professional development organization that includes academic, government and industry officials from the information technology field, released a study Thursday that said that shifting IT jobs to countries like India or China is not nearly the threat to workers here that is commonly believed.


The study cites estimates that between two to three percent of IT jobs will be lost annually to lower-wage developing countries through the process known as offshoring. But it said the U.S. IT sector's overall growth should outpace that loss of jobs, expanding opportunities for those trained in fields such as software architecture, product design, project management and IT consulting.

"Despite all the publicity in the United States about jobs being lost to India and China, the size of the IT employment market in the United States today is higher than it was at the height of the dot.com boom," said the report. "Information technology appears as though it will be a growth area at least for the coming decade, and the U.S. government projects that several IT occupations will be among the fastest growing occupations during this time."

And even with greater globalization, the report argues that the lower wage scales in India and China are not pushing down pay for U.S. IT workers. Citing information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, it said that IT workers have seen steady gains in average annual wages for different fields in the sector of between about two to five percent a year.

The study suggests that there are several factors in the continued growth in demand for IT workers here. The report said part of it is due to the use of offshoring by U.S. companies, including start-up firms, to limit their costs and thus grow their businesses. That, in turn, creates more opportunities here even as an increasing amount of work is done overseas.

The study also said that companies from a variety of sectors in the economy continue to discover greater efficiency and more competitive operations through investment in IT. The study therefore argues there will be continued growing demand for IT as underserved fields such as health care, retail trade, construction, and certain services make greater investment in technology.

The study said while there has been a lot of technological progress in recent years, such as low-cost broadband links with India and China, there are still a number of reasons U.S. companies will want to keep some IT jobs at home, including job processes that are not routine or the need to have face-to-face interaction for a specific job.

One of the greater threats to IT growth in the United States is the belief by many parents and young people that the field does not have good job prospects, which has resulted in a decline in students choosing to study various IT fields. It also sees tighter visa restrictions forcing more IT work offshore because fewer foreign students will be able to come here to study and provide the skill workers companies are looking for.

"In the past, one of the great advantages of the United States has been its higher education system. The United States still holds some significant advantages over India in the higher educational system," said the study. "For many years, the United States has been considered the place of choice for advanced degrees for people throughout the world, but this seems to be changing. Because of visa tightening and attitudes towards the United States in the post-9/11 era, the number of foreign students applying to graduate school in the United States has plummeted."

logiclife
03-07-2006, 12:33 PM
Here is the link:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11711007/from/RS.2/

WASHINGTON - The number of illegal immigrants in the United States has grown to as high as 12 million, according to a new estimate released Tuesday as the Senate considers legislation aimed at tightening America’s borders.

The Pew Hispanic Center report estimated that undocumented workers fill one out of every four agricultural jobs, 17 percent of all office and house cleaning positions, 14 percent of construction jobs, and 12 percent of those who work in food preparation.

The report found that the pace of illegal immigration is increasing, despite government efforts to crack down..........

More here: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11711007/from/RS.2/

edited: 10:08 PST removed the pictures -- logiclife.

Berkeleybee
03-07-2006, 01:26 PM
The visuals are powerful, but seriously if we started posting every article that comes along on illegal immigration, we'll drown out the ones that are about us. Lets not do what the press is already doing.

I meant this thread for articles on legal immigration and its problems.

best,
Berkeleybee

wellwishergc
03-07-2006, 01:45 PM
The more we separate ourselves from illegal immigration, the better. First of all, legal and illegal immigration are put in the same bill, so it becomes tougher for us to educate the congress men.. Putting the illegal immigration material on our forum will just make the issue more convoluted. Please note that IV now has a possible, commendable visibility even amongst congressmen.

The visuals are powerful, but seriously if we started posting every article that comes along on illegal immigration, we'll drown out the ones that are about us. Lets not do what the press is already doing.

I meant this thread for articles on legal immigration and its problems.

best,
Berkeleybee

logiclife
03-07-2006, 02:11 PM
Removed the pictures, kept the article since it pertains to senate activity on immigration(illegal but its activity on immigration).

Thanks,
logiclife.

garika
03-07-2006, 03:56 PM
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1441915.cms

Now, studying in UK will be easier

NEW DELHI: Britain on Wednesday launched a new 'easier and fairer' points-based immigration system for students aspiring to study in universities there.

Addressing a group of students here via video-conferencing from London, Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair said the system would ensure that highly-skilled workers needed in Britian are able to migrate without abusing the immigration process.

"We want students to come and study in our universities and we want highly skilled workers that we need for our economy but we want to prevent abuses of the immigration system," he told students.

"We have benefitted enormously from migration in our country and the Indian community has made a huge contribution," he said.

"I hope that you will find it easier and also fairer (to travel to Britain). The United Kingdom offers tremendous benefits for students that want to come and study here from abroad," Blair said.

Earlier, British Home Secretary Charles Clarke said a 'simple' points-based migration system would replace the earlier "bureaucratic and unresponsive" 80-channel process using which workers and students could enter the country.

British High Commissioner to India Michael Arthur said the new system was "good news" for Indian students who have chosen Britain as their destination for higher studies.

"Five years back 5,000 students were studying in British universities. The figure has now risen to 17,000," he said.

ragz4u
03-07-2006, 10:40 PM
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/politics/article349906.ece. I have copied the article below

Berkeleybee, stucklabor

We can probably add this article as a component of the meet the lawmakers package. This can be used to convey how US could could lose it's competitive edge if other countries lay down the red carpet for skilled immigrants. Note that immigrants from ALL countries are welcome.

Article

Lower-skilled migrants from the developing world will face an uphill struggle to win permission to work in Britain under moves to overhaul the immigration system. A new points-based system will give priority to young workers of all nationalities with highly sought-after qualifications in such areas as medicine and science.

But the new system will make it difficult for temporary migrants from outside the European Union, who have previously been able to work legally in Britain on work permit schemes, to come legally to this country.

Charles Clarke, the Home Secretary, announced a five-tier immigration structure, described as "the most significant change to managed migration in the past 40 years". The top tier will focus on the most skilled workers who will be given points for their youth, academic achievements and earning power. Those with enough points will be allowed immediate entry and the prospect of being allowed to settle permanently within two years.

The second will allow skilled workers, such as nurses, teachers and engineers, to come if they have job offers and also accumulate enough points. They could also gain permission to settle within five years.
The third will allow low-skilled workers, who could include labourers and fruit pickers, into Britain for a fixed period to fill jobs shortages. The Home Office said: "Our starting-point is that employers should look first to recruit from the UK and the expanded EU before recruiting from outside the EU." These workers, who could stay for a year, could not come from countries with a track record of illegal immigration. They could be required to prove they are sending some of their pay home and to produce return air tickets.

The fourth tier will place strict controls on students, who will only be allowed entry if they have a place at an approved university or college, while the fifth will cover working tourists.

Mr Clarke won the backing of the TUC and the employers' organisation, the CBI. But the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants said: "The Government says it is committed to making poverty history in the developing world - how is making migration harder for people from those countries going to help that?"

prabirmehta
03-08-2006, 05:55 PM
Visa restrictions are keeping entrepreneurial immigrants away, and they're finding new opportunities overseas.

At the tender age of 31, Praveen Suthrum would already seem to have achieved the American dream. He came to the United States from India in 1999 to work as a software consultant. He got an MBA from the University of Michigan, worked on a book about emerging economies with the star professor C.K. Prahalad, and consulted on technology initiatives for Iraq's new government. Last year, Suthrum started NextServices, a company in Ann Arbor, Mich., that codes doctor's bills and collects insurance payments.

Yes, you could almost hear a Rotarian extolling him in a speech about the enduring virtues of the land of opportunity--except for the inconvenient fact that Suthrum is currently stuck in Mumbai. He went back to India in May to evaluate setting up an operation there. Because of visa delays, he has remained there ever since--unable to visit clients in the U.S., able to talk to his employees only by telephone.

In the post-9/11 world, Suthrum's visa hassles are unsurprising. But his situation reflects a larger debate on America's immigration policies--one that's been getting fiery lately. Along the borders, a vigilante group called the Minuteman is patrolling for illegal aliens who come looking for day-laborer work. But even foreign nationals with advanced degrees and specialized skills who hope to come to America have reason to worry. In Congress, for example, Rep. Tom Tancredo, R-Colo., has proposed getting rid of entire categories of work visas.

Business interests have largely resisted these efforts, arguing that there should be more visas, not fewer, because U.S. employers rely on immigrants to fill gaps in the domestic work force. These gaps are created, they say, by the lack of proficiency in math and science among U.S. students, and by the aging of the population.

It's a valid argument--China, for example, graduated almost nine times as many engineers as the U.S. did last year--but it also misses an important point. Debating whether immigrants take jobs from Americans ignores the fact that well-educated foreigners like Suthrum come to the States to be not employees but employers. Today's visa restrictions could keep out tomorrow's Andy Grove, Sergey Brin, or Jerry Yang.

Anti-immigrant policies are particularly destructive at a time when entrepreneurs have more options than ever as to where to start a company. Open markets and the rule of law are taking root abroad. Technology makes it easier to work with companies overseas. As was made plain by a recent report compiled by the National Academies at the request of Congress, the U.S. is no longer the only game in town. America's position as the destination of choice for foreign-born entrepreneurs is being contested as never before.

"Home's Not So Bad"
To get a sense of the problem, you can start by looking at H-1B visas, the credential that most skilled foreign workers use to enter the U.S. for employment. To qualify for an H-1B, a person must have a college degree and a job waiting for him or her at a company in a specialized field like engineering or computer science.

Five years ago, Congress increased the number of visas by 70% to 195,000. It let the higher cap expire in 2004 and set a new cap of 65,000 visas per year. As a result,

H-1Bs have become so scarce that the government stopped accepting applications for fiscal year 2006 in August--two months before the fiscal year even began (see chart). "It's about as bad as it's ever been with the H-1Bs," says Joel Stewart, an immigration lawyer with Fowler White Burnett in Miami.

For entrepreneurs, a visa snafu can be costly. Hector Saldaña, the CEO of LignUp, a VoIP company in Mountain View, Calif., recently lost an Indian recruit to a Bangalore company when he couldn't get the visa application processed fast enough.

A decade ago, an entrepreneur like Saldaña wouldn't have worried about losing a candidate to India. The U.S. was a necessary stop for ambitious, educated Indians. By 1998, Indians ran almost one in 10 Silicon Valley companies, and they are still coming to America in large numbers to work at fast-growing companies. Last year, India received more H-1B admittances than any other country, accounting for more than 20% of them. This was remarkable given that India ranked only 11th in terms of total foreigners coming into the U.S. on a short-term basis.

But in India today, it is easy to see how tighter immigration policies can hurt the U.S. Successful, well-educated Indians seem to be repatriating in greater numbers. The leading software association in India estimates that 25,000 Indian IT workers returned home between 2001 and 2004. The main draw is a burgeoning economy. India's gross domestic product grew by 14.65% last year, double the U.S.'s 6.57% growth rate.

Offshoring is a key driver of India's economy, and one presumably unintended effect of the U.S.'s stricter immigration policies is to push more work overseas. If companies can't import the technical talent they need, they "absolutely have the ability to hire offshore," says Bryan Stolle, CEO of Agile Software in San Jose, Calif.

He speaks from experience. Four years ago, in part because of visa problems, Stolle opened an office in Bangalore, followed by one in Suzhou, China. Since then, about 100 of his 750 employees have elected to transfer their jobs abroad, where they can live, in some ways, better than they can in the wildly expensive Bay area. "The economies and the opportunities in India and China were getting a lot better," Stolle says. "And a lot of people who used to come here saying that this was the place to be, are starting to say, You know what? Home's not so bad."

Visas, Green Cards, and Other Solutions
If immigrants truly are critical to America's continued prosperity, how can the system be fixed? Some solutions are already at hand. Late last year, Congress set aside 20,000 more H-1Bs for workers who complete graduate school in the U.S. Lawmakers are now contemplating raising the limit again--in October, the Senate Judiciary Committee endorsed a cap of 95,000. Elsewhere in the Senate, where immigration reform will top the agenda in the new year, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., are working on a bill that would, among other things, create more employment-based green cards.

As for Praveen Suthrum, he'll jump on a plane to the States the moment his visa's approved, but in the meantime, he has decided to make Mumbai his permanent home. He has struck up friendships with some other American-educated entrepreneurs. And in Mumbai, Suthrum can pay college graduates $5,000 a year to code doctor's bills, one-tenth of what he'd pay workers in Ann Arbor. "We'll have part of the work in the U.S. and part in India," he says. "Whatever is right for business, we will just do that."

Stephanie Clifford can be reached at sclifford@inc.com.

prabirmehta
03-08-2006, 05:57 PM
While the U.S. dithers, other nations are recruiting entrepreneurs.

India may be a big draw, but the U.S. faces competition for talent elsewhere. Canada and Australia have recently changed their policies to favor immigrants with university degrees and business expertise. The U.S. continues to favor relatives over skilled workers.
Meanwhile, programs sponsored by Singapore, Israel, and Ireland are luring entrepreneurial expatriates back from the U.S. One of the pioneering initiatives is in Taiwan. A technology incubator called the Hsinchu Science Park focuses on recruiting Taiwanese-born U.S. residents to come back home. One-third of the park's 370 companies are run by returning Taiwanese; among them is a Stanford alumnus who launched Macronix International, a semiconductor business that now has a market cap of $1.3 billion. Says David Heenan, who writes about these programs in his new book Flight Capital: The Alarming Exodus of America's Best and Brightest: "On a 10-point scale, in terms of national incentives, we're at about a one."

Stephanie Clifford can be reached at sclifford@inc.com.

Berkeleybee
03-08-2006, 07:39 PM
Great stuff people. I will try to monitor this thread every day.

It would be great if you would post links to the articles.

I go to the website and save the article as pdf -- that way even if the article is archived we have have a copy.

Thanks,
Berkeleybee

waitingonlc
03-08-2006, 08:21 PM
Two Sides of the Same Coin
The Connection Between Legal and Illegal Immigration

WASHINGTON (March 2006) – ''Legal immigration good, illegal immigration bad.''

This is often the limit of the analysis underlying debates over immigration in Congress. Supporters of amnesty and guestworker programs often claim that if only illegal aliens were legalized, the problems they create would disappear. In addition, many of the immigration proposals currently being considered would significantly increase ordinary legal immigration; Sen. Arlen Specter's bill, for instance, would double the number of green cards issued, to as many as 2 million each year.

To add some depth to this superficial understanding of the issue, the Center for Immigration Studies has released a new report, ''Two Sides of the Same Coin: The Connection Between Legal and Illegal Immigration,'' by James R. Edwards, Jr., Ph.D. Edwards, an adjunct fellow at the Hudson Institute and co-author of The Congressional Politics of Immigration Reform, explores the intertwined histories of legal and illegal immigration and how current immigration policy encourages lawbreaking. The report, available online at http://www.cis.org/articles/2006/back106.html , finds the following:

* Legal and illegal immigration are inextricably related. As legal immigration levels have risen markedly since 1965, illegal immigration has increased with it.

* The share of the foreign-born population who are illegal aliens has risen steadily. Illegal aliens made up 21 percent of the foreign-born in 1980, 25 percent in 2000, and 28 percent in 2005.

* Mexico is the primary source country of both legal and illegal immigrants. Mexico accounted for about 30 percent of the foreign-born in 2000, and more than half of Mexicans residing in the United States in 2000 were illegal aliens.

* The level of illegal immigration is severely masked by several amnesties that legalized millions of unlawfully resident aliens. The largest amnesty was the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, which legalized 3 million aliens.

* Amnestied aliens to date have been fully eligible to sponsor additional immigrants. This has contributed to the ranks of immigrants, both legal and illegal (and often both).

* Many aliens who receive a permanent resident visa each year have spent years living in the United States illegally.

* Amnesties, technical qualification for a visa, chain migration, and vast opportunities to come to the United States (particularly via the tourist visa, the most abused visa by eventual immigrants, according to the New Immigrant Survey) all foster an ''entitlement mentality'' among many foreigners.

For more information, contact Dr. Edwards at jedwards@olive-edwards.com.

Berkeleybee
03-08-2006, 08:53 PM
All the CIS article says is that the immigration increased, both legal and illegal, that doesn't imply causation.

A little background on CIS pointed out by Sandeep:

"CIS can relate anything to illegal immigration. See below - a WSJ article

http://www.house.gov/cannon/Features/Immigration/editorials/wallstreet2.htm

dixie
03-09-2006, 10:18 PM
For Green Card Applicants, Waiting Is the Hardest Part
Backlog Has Put Immigrant Workers In the Dark Longer About Their Status

By S. Mitra Kalita
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, July 23, 2005; Page D01

BALA CYNWYD, Pa. Hundreds of thousands of immigrant workers trying to stay in the United States find their journey halted somewhere along a maze of boxes, filing cabinets and cubicles of government contractors.

The backlog of foreign workers seeking green cards, which allow immigrants to live and work in the United States permanently, numbers more than 330,000. In September, the Department of Labor set up a center here and another in Dallas to quicken the first step of processing for employment-based green cards.

But while the federal agency said it has spent time and money to ease a complicated traffic jam, immigrants, their employers and lawyers have been growing impatient.

"It's too long," said Rajesh Poudyal, who emigrated from Nepal 15 years ago on a student visa. His employer, a contractor for NASA in Greenbelt, applied for his green card in November 2001. "You don't know if it's going to be another three-year wait. You keep thinking, 'It's gonna happen. It's gonna happen.' "

And yet it hasn't.

Government officials say the wait has been too long for most of the immigrant workers hoping for their green cards. The oldest case is from August 1998. On March 28, the Labor Department introduced a computerized fast-track processing system to handle new applications, doling them out to two centers. Between the backlog centers and the new sites, labor officials said, they have streamlined a multi-layered process that could have had some waiting as long as six more years. Now, they say, the backlog should be cleared within two years.

In employment-based green card applications, the Labor Department essentially certifies that the employer exists and that the immigrant is being paid the prevailing wage for the job described. In most cases, employers must also prove that they sought to hire U.S. workers for the job but could not. As proof, they provide classified advertisements, competing résumés and summaries of their recruitment methods.

From this stage, known as labor certification, the application travels to the Department of Homeland Security, which conducts its own review and decides whether to allow the immigrant to petition for residency status.

Before the backlog accumulated, immigration attorneys say, labor certification generally took 30 to 90 days.

Under the new fast-track system, labor officials say, the process should routinely take up to 60 days.

But there is no such expectation for the 174,000 people awaiting processing here from about half the states, including Maryland and Virginia, and the District. Besides 10 federal workers, the remaining staff of 100 work for Exceed Corp., the company that successfully bid for the backlog contract.

Starting last year, all 50 states sent boxes upon boxes to one of the two backlog sites. Officials said that they hope to act on the applications on a first-in, first-out basis and that they have entered about 80 percent of the applicants' data into a computerized system over the past year.

"In government terms, that has been quite a short amount of time," said Emily Stover DeRocco, assistant secretary of labor for employment and training.

The backlog stems from the passage of legislation that allowed undocumented immigrants or immigrants who had overstayed their visas to apply for green cards if a family member or employer sponsored them -- but they had to do it by April 2001. The result was a surge of green card applications.


The result has also been some resentment of workers who have not been in the United States legally from workers who have.

"They've given priority to illegal immigrants," said Poudyal, who is on the visa for highly skilled but temporary workers known as an H-1B."That's how we've become stuck."

Most difficult, the immigrants and their advocates say, has been the lack of communication from the Department of Labor about their status. Is their folder in a box that has even been opened? Is it in the data-entry process? Is their employer's address being verified, their pay being analyzed?

"It has gone into a black box," said Poudyal, the father of two who owns a home in Lanham. "You don't know what's inside."

His employer and lawyer have tried to check on the status with no luck. "So you just hope," Poudyal said.

At the center, officials say it is not uncommon for irate immigrants to show up at their doors. They say calls from members of Congress and human resources managers inquiring about specific applications are getting more common. But they remind critics that the system of immigration is driven by employers' needs and not immigrants' wants.

It is not a perfect system, DeRocco said in a recent interview. She said her agency has responded to "tens of thousands" of requests for status reports. Behind every case number, every file, she said, is someone who desperately wants to call the United States home.

"We care very deeply about that," she said. "We not only understand but believe we are doing it for those individuals."

The Labor Department will be involved in discussions about overall immigration reform, she said.

"H visas are not meeting the employers' need," DeRocco said, referring to the temporary work-related visas. "Immigration reform is very high on everyone's agenda."

Companies have started speaking out about U.S. immigration policy, saying it affects their ability to hire the best people. Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates has repeatedly advocated removing caps on H-1B visas.

Immigration lawyer Liz Espin Stern of Baker & McKenzie LLP said, other countries are trying to make immigrating easier. "Canada, the U.K., Australia are passing foreign-employee-friendly policies," she said. "It's a very inviting program. Our program in the U.S. has shifted. It sends a message: Don't come."

Employers say the backlog also has become expensive. After six years, companies with employees who have been on an H-1B visa must apply for extensions -- and pay the associated legal and filing fees -- every year while the green card is being processed.

"There's a bit of an expense associated with it," said Cliff Sink, the chief executive of EastBanc Technologies LLC in the District. He said the cost of sponsoring one immigrant employee ranges from $3,000 to $5,000. "We stopped paying for the green card because the prices had gone up so much."

His reality might seem incongruous with an immigration policy that mandates that these green cards are employer-driven, but many immigrants do end up paying for their passage to permanent residency.

After paying nearly $10,000 for lawyers, Gopal Ratnam, a journalist from India, said he thinks he has made too hefty an investment to turn back. Besides, his daughters are accustomed to U.S. schools and ways.

"One stage of it has taken four years," said Ratnam, a staff writer for Army Times Publishing Co.'s Defense News in Springfield. "I've invested all the money, resources and time. Should I just say, 'All right, I will give it up and go back to where I came from?' "

Even after the backlog on the Labor Department's end is cleared, immigration attorney Michael Maggio warns, the wait might not be over. He worries the Homeland Security Department might not be able to meet the demand for employment-based green cards with current quotas.

"We're looking at a situation that's just ongoing," he said.

maverick6993
03-09-2006, 11:14 PM
A feature appeared on H1-B Visas/Legal Immigration on Marktplace on NPR.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/2006/03/09/PM200603098.html

eb_retrogession
03-09-2006, 11:46 PM
For Green Card Applicants, Waiting Is the Hardest Part
Backlog Has Put Immigrant Workers In the Dark Longer About Their Status

By S. Mitra Kalita
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, July 23, 2005; Page D01

BALA CYNWYD, Pa. Hundreds of thousands of immigrant workers trying to stay in the United States find their journey halted somewhere along a maze of boxes, filing cabinets and cubicles of government contractors.

The backlog of foreign workers seeking green cards, which allow immigrants to live and work in the United States permanently, numbers more than 330,000. In September, the Department of Labor set up a center here and another in Dallas to quicken the first step of processing for employment-based green cards.

But while the federal agency said it has spent time and money to ease a complicated traffic jam, immigrants, their employers and lawyers have been growing impatient.

"It's too long," said Rajesh Poudyal, who emigrated from Nepal 15 years ago on a student visa. His employer, a contractor for NASA in Greenbelt, applied for his green card in November 2001. "You don't know if it's going to be another three-year wait. You keep thinking, 'It's gonna happen. It's gonna happen.' "

And yet it hasn't.

Government officials say the wait has been too long for most of the immigrant workers hoping for their green cards. The oldest case is from August 1998. On March 28, the Labor Department introduced a computerized fast-track processing system to handle new applications, doling them out to two centers. Between the backlog centers and the new sites, labor officials said, they have streamlined a multi-layered process that could have had some waiting as long as six more years. Now, they say, the backlog should be cleared within two years.

In employment-based green card applications, the Labor Department essentially certifies that the employer exists and that the immigrant is being paid the prevailing wage for the job described. In most cases, employers must also prove that they sought to hire U.S. workers for the job but could not. As proof, they provide classified advertisements, competing résumés and summaries of their recruitment methods.

From this stage, known as labor certification, the application travels to the Department of Homeland Security, which conducts its own review and decides whether to allow the immigrant to petition for residency status.

Before the backlog accumulated, immigration attorneys say, labor certification generally took 30 to 90 days.

Under the new fast-track system, labor officials say, the process should routinely take up to 60 days.

But there is no such expectation for the 174,000 people awaiting processing here from about half the states, including Maryland and Virginia, and the District. Besides 10 federal workers, the remaining staff of 100 work for Exceed Corp., the company that successfully bid for the backlog contract.

Starting last year, all 50 states sent boxes upon boxes to one of the two backlog sites. Officials said that they hope to act on the applications on a first-in, first-out basis and that they have entered about 80 percent of the applicants' data into a computerized system over the past year.

"In government terms, that has been quite a short amount of time," said Emily Stover DeRocco, assistant secretary of labor for employment and training.

The backlog stems from the passage of legislation that allowed undocumented immigrants or immigrants who had overstayed their visas to apply for green cards if a family member or employer sponsored them -- but they had to do it by April 2001. The result was a surge of green card applications.


The result has also been some resentment of workers who have not been in the United States legally from workers who have.

"They've given priority to illegal immigrants," said Poudyal, who is on the visa for highly skilled but temporary workers known as an H-1B."That's how we've become stuck."

Most difficult, the immigrants and their advocates say, has been the lack of communication from the Department of Labor about their status. Is their folder in a box that has even been opened? Is it in the data-entry process? Is their employer's address being verified, their pay being analyzed?

"It has gone into a black box," said Poudyal, the father of two who owns a home in Lanham. "You don't know what's inside."

His employer and lawyer have tried to check on the status with no luck. "So you just hope," Poudyal said.

At the center, officials say it is not uncommon for irate immigrants to show up at their doors. They say calls from members of Congress and human resources managers inquiring about specific applications are getting more common. But they remind critics that the system of immigration is driven by employers' needs and not immigrants' wants.

It is not a perfect system, DeRocco said in a recent interview. She said her agency has responded to "tens of thousands" of requests for status reports. Behind every case number, every file, she said, is someone who desperately wants to call the United States home.

"We care very deeply about that," she said. "We not only understand but believe we are doing it for those individuals."

The Labor Department will be involved in discussions about overall immigration reform, she said.

"H visas are not meeting the employers' need," DeRocco said, referring to the temporary work-related visas. "Immigration reform is very high on everyone's agenda."

Companies have started speaking out about U.S. immigration policy, saying it affects their ability to hire the best people. Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates has repeatedly advocated removing caps on H-1B visas.

Immigration lawyer Liz Espin Stern of Baker & McKenzie LLP said, other countries are trying to make immigrating easier. "Canada, the U.K., Australia are passing foreign-employee-friendly policies," she said. "It's a very inviting program. Our program in the U.S. has shifted. It sends a message: Don't come."

Employers say the backlog also has become expensive. After six years, companies with employees who have been on an H-1B visa must apply for extensions -- and pay the associated legal and filing fees -- every year while the green card is being processed.

"There's a bit of an expense associated with it," said Cliff Sink, the chief executive of EastBanc Technologies LLC in the District. He said the cost of sponsoring one immigrant employee ranges from $3,000 to $5,000. "We stopped paying for the green card because the prices had gone up so much."

His reality might seem incongruous with an immigration policy that mandates that these green cards are employer-driven, but many immigrants do end up paying for their passage to permanent residency.

After paying nearly $10,000 for lawyers, Gopal Ratnam, a journalist from India, said he thinks he has made too hefty an investment to turn back. Besides, his daughters are accustomed to U.S. schools and ways.

"One stage of it has taken four years," said Ratnam, a staff writer for Army Times Publishing Co.'s Defense News in Springfield. "I've invested all the money, resources and time. Should I just say, 'All right, I will give it up and go back to where I came from?' "

Even after the backlog on the Labor Department's end is cleared, immigration attorney Michael Maggio warns, the wait might not be over. He worries the Homeland Security Department might not be able to meet the demand for employment-based green cards with current quotas.

"We're looking at a situation that's just ongoing," he said.

Good find. I hope this WP post will stir some debate about EB immigrants

dixie
03-10-2006, 12:16 AM
Remember, this was BEFORE the october 2005 bulletin when retro hit home. I shudder to even imagine what the situation is like now :mad: it might be worth trying to contact this journalist (She's of indian origin) to follow up on the situation.That would rescue legal immigration from all the din about illegal aliens drowning the mainstream media right now.

Berkeleybee
03-10-2006, 03:05 PM
Remember, this was BEFORE the october 2005 bulletin when retro hit home. I shudder to even imagine what the situation is like now :mad: it might be worth trying to contact this journalist (She's of indian origin) to follow up on the situation.That would rescue legal immigration from all the din about illegal aliens drowning the mainstream media right now.

I should let sunjoshi respond to this -- but I believe he has been in touch with her/him?

nlssubbu
03-10-2006, 10:49 PM
The new USCIS cheif says that they are ready to clear the backlog of the existing immigration visas, but the latest Visa bulletines shows the signs in different direction.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/3713182.html

Our immigrant community will be more happy, if he put this into action!

Thanks
nlssubbu

dixie
03-11-2006, 09:10 AM
well,the best USCIS can do is speed up processing .. it cannot do much about quotas and limited visa numbers .. it is the DOS which sets the retro dates for the bulletin. We need BOTH faster processing by USCIS and change in immigration laws.Fixing one without the other worsens the matter .. PERM is an excellent example.

waitingonlc
03-12-2006, 01:42 PM
My wife who is on H4 wrote a letter regarding the retrogression issue to Arlen spector and here is what is the reply we got.

Thank you for contacting my office regarding immigration reform. I appreciate your concern regarding this important matter.

Reforming our current immigration laws has become increasingly necessary in light of the growing number of illegal immigrants entering the country. On a daily basis, there are a number of press reports highlighting the problem that our borders are largely unprotected. However, we also have a great need for labor in this country, both skilled and unskilled, which adds to the complexity of the situation. We also see a certain apathy and resentment toward immigrants; notwithstanding the fact that this country was built by immigrants and that we need immigrants in order to sustain our economic vitality. At present, there are several bills pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee aimed at correcting various aspects of the problem. As Chairman, I circulated a Chairman's Mark to address the complex issues that we will face as we begin to reform immigration laws. My proposal is a discussion draft intend! ed to move the debate forward with the anticipation that the Senate will address the issue early this year.



I sincerely appreciate your taking the time to bring your views on this important matter to my attention. As your United States Senator, it is essential that I be kept fully informed on the issues of concern to my constituents. Be assured that I will keep your thoughts in mind on this issue and related issues during the 109 th Congress. Should you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact my office or visit my website at www.specter.senate.gov .



Sincerely,





Arlen Specter

learning01
03-13-2006, 02:56 PM
Buried in the Senate's giant immigration bill -- hardly noticed amid a fierce debate over a guest-worker program for unskilled laborers -- are provisions that would open the country's doors to highly skilled immigrants for science, math, technology and engineering jobs.

The provisions were sought by Silicon Valley tech companies and enjoy significant bipartisan support amid concern that the United States might lose its lead in technology. They would broaden avenues to legal immigration for foreign tech workers and would put those with advanced degrees on an automatic path to permanent residence should they want it.

The measures include nearly doubling the number of H-1B skilled-worker temporary visas to 115,000 -- with an option of raising the cap 20 percent more each year. H-1B visas were highly controversial in the Bay Area when their numbers reached a peak of 195,000 in 2003.

Congress had increased the visas during the late 1990s dot-com boom, when Silicon Valley complained of tech-worker shortages, although native-born engineers complained that their wages were undermined by cheap labor from India and China.

With the tech crash and the revelation that some of the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackers had entered the country on student visas, the political climate for foreign workers darkened, and Congress quietly allowed the number of H-1B visas to plummet back to 65,000 a year.

The cap was reached in August -- in effect turning off the tap of the visas for 14 months. A special exemption of 20,000 visas for workers with advanced degrees was reached in January.

"We're in a bad crunch right now," said Laura Reiff, head of the Essential Worker Immigration Coalition, a business umbrella group backing more immigration. "We are totally jammed on immigrant visas, the green card category, and totally jammed on H-1B visas. You can't bring in tech workers right now."

Alarm in Washington has shifted from student hijackers to U.S. competitiveness. Indian and Chinese students face brighter prospects in their own booming economies, and the fear now is that they no longer want to come to the United States.

The new skilled immigration measures are part of a controversial 300-page bill by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter, R-Pa., now being rewritten by the committee with the goal of reaching the Senate floor by the end of the month.

Other provisions include a new F-4 visa category for students pursuing advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics. These students would be granted permanent residence if they find a job in their field and pay a $1,000 fee toward scholarships and training of U.S. workers.

Labor certification rules also would be streamlined for foreigners holding the desired advanced degrees from a U.S. university. Immigrants with advanced degrees in the desired fields, as well as those of "extraordinary ability" and "outstanding professors and researchers," would also get an exemption from the cap on employment-based green cards and slots for permanent residence.

"The U.S. is educating these people," said Kara Calvert, director of government relations for the Information Technology Industry Council, a tech industry group. "This allows these students to remain in the U.S. and contribute to the U.S. economy."

The provisions for highly skilled workers enjoy support in both parties in the Senate and in the Bush administration after a raft of high-profile studies have warned that the United States is not producing enough math and science students and is in danger of losing its global edge in innovation to India and China.

Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy echoed many in the tech industry at a conference in Washington on Wednesday when he warned that if skilled immigration is not expanded, "There will be a great sucking sound of innovation out of the U.S.''

Silicon Valley venture capitalist John Doerr suggested at a technology summit last fall that the United States "should staple a green card to every kid, every foreign national that graduates with a degree in engineering and science, so that they stay here. Imagine innovation in America without Andy Grove, without Jerry Yang, without Sergey Brin -- Hungarian, Chinese, Russian. These immigrants have contributed enormously to innovation and our well-being."

But House Republicans are cool toward any increase in legal immigration, including skilled workers, and are at sharp odds with the White House. They passed a bill in December to crack down on border enforcement, calling for construction of a 700-mile fence on the border with Mexico.

House Republicans omitted skilled immigration from their "Innovation and Competitiveness Act," released with much pomp last week, prompting House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, to blast the proposal as doing nothing "to ensure that the best and brightest from around the world are able to contribute to innovation in the United States."

Nor has Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a California Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, shown much enthusiasm for more skilled workers, preferring her own plan for a guest-worker program limited to agriculture. Feinstein questioned the tech proposals in an interview last week.

Her stance has angered California's high-tech business community. Industry officials said CEOs from California and across the country have pleaded with Feinstein to no avail. They complain that she is ignoring the technology industry, which they contend is vital to the state's economy, but is willing to provide amnesty to 900,000 Mexican farmworkers, most of whom work in California.

Opponents of broadening immigration for skilled workers said doing so would defeat efforts to get more Americans interested in science, math, engineering and other technological fields.

"It sends the message to students in those fields now, why bother if you're going to have a hard time getting a job in the U.S. because we're importing workers in those fields who are working for less than it would take to hire an American worker," said Caroline Espinosa, spokeswoman for NumbersUSA, a group opposed to expanding immigration.

NumbersUSA estimated, using Department of Education figures, that 250,000 nonresident aliens are studying math, science, engineering and related fields in the United States.

E-mail Carolyn Lochhead at clochhead@sfchronicle.com.

Page A - 1
URL: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2006/03/10/MNGV9HLVAE1.DTL

eb3_nepa
03-13-2006, 03:05 PM
My wife who is on H4 wrote a letter regarding the retrogression issue to Arlen spector and here is what is the reply we got.

Thank you for contacting my office regarding immigration reform. I appreciate your concern regarding this important matter.

Reforming our current immigration laws has become increasingly necessary in light of the growing number of illegal immigrants entering the country. On a daily basis, there are a number of press reports highlighting the problem that our borders are largely unprotected. However, we also have a great need for labor in this country, both skilled and unskilled, which adds to the complexity of the situation. We also see a certain apathy and resentment toward immigrants; notwithstanding the fact that this country was built by immigrants and that we need immigrants in order to sustain our economic vitality. At present, there are several bills pending before the Senate Judiciary Committee aimed at correcting various aspects of the problem. As Chairman, I circulated a Chairman's Mark to address the complex issues that we will face as we begin to reform immigration laws. My proposal is a discussion draft intend! ed to move the debate forward with the anticipation that the Senate will address the issue early this year.



I sincerely appreciate your taking the time to bring your views on this important matter to my attention. As your United States Senator, it is essential that I be kept fully informed on the issues of concern to my constituents. Be assured that I will keep your thoughts in mind on this issue and related issues during the 109 th Congress. Should you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact my office or visit my website at www.specter.senate.gov .



Sincerely,





Arlen Specter

We got the SAME exact thing both by email and regular mail.

Berkeleybee
03-13-2006, 08:51 PM
Thanks to those who have been posting articles and links.

Please post replies from Senators to another thread. Lets make this a one stop news articles only thread.

Thanks

mjdup
03-14-2006, 11:23 AM
http://ia.rediff.com/money/2006/mar/14visas.htm?q=tp&file=.htm

US Bill seeks to double H-1B visas

March 14, 2006 11:13 IST

A measure to double the number of H-1B skilled-worker temporary visas to 115,000 -- with an option of raising the cap 20 per cent more each year -- has been introduced in the Senate's giant Immigration Bill, now pending before US Congress.

If passed, the Bill would open US' doors to highly skilled immigrants for science, math, technology and engineering jobs from India, China and other nations.

The H1-B visa provisions were sought by Silicon Valley technology companies and enjoy significant bipartisan support amid concern that the United States might lose its lead in technology, according to a report in the San Francisco Chronicle.

The provision for highly skilled workers enjoys support in both parties in the Senate and in President George W Bush's administration after a raft of high-profile studies have warned that the United States is not producing enough math and science students and is in danger of losing its global edge in innovation to India and China.

The new skilled immigration measures are part of a controversial 300-page bill by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter, now being rewritten by the committee with the goal of reaching the Senate floor by the end of the month.

Other provisions in the bill include a new F-4 visa category for students pursuing advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics. These students would be granted permanent residence if they find a job in their field and pay a $1,000 fee toward scholarships and training of US workers.

Other proposals in the bill include streamlining labour certification rules for foreigners holding the desired advanced degrees from a US university.

Immigrants with advanced degrees in the desired fields, as well as those of 'extraordinary ability' and 'outstanding professors and researchers,' would also get an exemption from the cap on employment-based green cards and slots for permanent residence.

H-1B visas were highly controversial in California's Bay Area when their numbers peaked to 195,000 in 2003, when Congress had increased the visas during the late 1990s dot-com boom and Silicon Valley complained of tech-worker shortages.

However Congress quietly allowed the number of H-1B visas to plummet back to 65,000 a year when the dot-com bubble burst and the revelation that some of the September 11, 2001 hijackers had entered the country on student visas.

The cap was reached quickly in August -- in effect turning off the tap of the visas for 14 months. A special exemption of 20,000 visas for workers with advanced degrees was reached in January.
And the Essential Worker Immigration Coalition, a business umbrella group backing more immigration put out a statement to say: "We are totally jammed on immigrant visas, the green card category, and totally jammed on H-1B visas. You can't bring in technology workers right now."

katrina
03-14-2006, 12:39 PM
http://www.aibs.org/washington-watch/washington_watch_2006_03.html

RK1
03-14-2006, 01:14 PM
Interesting Info at Numbersusa
Gives the increase in the no of green cards in Sen. Specters Markup.

http://www.numbersusa.com/PDFs/SensenbrennervsSpecter030106.pdf

jungalee43
03-15-2006, 10:08 AM
In an editorial titled "Immigration's Moment" dated March 15, 2006 New York Times has extended support to provisions in McCain-Kennedy bill. Please follow the link.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/15/opinion/15wed2.html?th&emc=th

mdforgc
03-16-2006, 07:06 AM
Read this article from Immigration Policy where they studied the effect of foreign workers on native worker wages. Very useful to refute NUSA. it is posted on the breaking news page of www.immigration-law.com, cant get a specific link to paste here but can be downloaded as a PDF

MerciesOfInjustices
03-16-2006, 09:14 AM
Read this article from Immigration Policy where they studied the effect of foreign workers on native worker wages. Very useful to refute NUSA. it is posted on the breaking news page of www.immigration-law.com, cant get a specific link to paste here but can be downloaded as a PDF
Here's the article, which is published in the March newsletter of the American Immigration Law Foundation http://www.ailf.org/ipc/infocus/2006_skillswages.pdf.

learning01
03-16-2006, 07:32 PM
Tech Firms Say H-1B Visa Caps Create Shortage Of Skilled Staff
BY LAURA MANDARO

INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY

Posted 3/8/2006

America, a nation of immigrants, has long attracted the best and brightest from around the world.

Legions of U.S. tech companies, from Hotmail to Sun Micro to Intel, got their start when their immigrant founders took skills and education from the old country and applied them to the new.

But for some foreign professionals, visa shortages and delays are making America more of a stopping-off point than a destination.

In 2003, software engineer Prashanth Chandroth was getting anxious. His H-1B visa, the employer-sponsored work permit granted to skilled workers, was set to run out.

After hopping between contract firms during the dot-com boom and bust, Chandroth could start the costly and lengthy process of obtaining a green card — or return to India, where he had sent his family when the tech downturn hit.

His solution? Move to Canada.

Within 18 months of applying, the Kerala, India, native had permanent residency. Six months after moving to Toronto, he got a job at Sprint Canada.

"Now I don't have any hassles," said Chandroth. "I'm a free bird."

Meanwhile, U.S. employers say they're struggling to fill their growing tech work forces. The ranks of visa holders are small. Example: 0.5% of Hewlett Packard's 53,000 U.S. workers have H-1Bs.

Tech companies fear the U.S. will lose its competitive edge if skilled foreign workers stop putting down roots here.

"The way our immigration system is acting, it's almost becoming a disincentive for these best and brightest individuals to come to the U.S.," said Leslie Nicolett, a staff manager in immigration policy at Hewlett-Packard Americas.

The annual cap on H-1B visas has fallen from 195,000 in 2003 to 65,000 now.

Such tight availability might not have mattered much a few years ago, when companies were laying off workers and freezing hiring.

But tech jobs have rebounded. So every H-1B visa available for fiscal 2006 starting in October had run out in August, or two months before the year even started.

Visa Caps Hurt Tech Firms

The visa shortage creates difficulties for tech firms that say they need to hire immigrants to fill specialized jobs, particularly those requiring advanced degrees.

"We weren't able to hire everyone we wanted" last year because of the visa limits, said Microsoft's (MSFT) Marland Buckner, a senior federal affairs manager.

Now they're pushing to lift the cap or get rid of it altogether.

The Senate last week started to debate a broad immigration bill that includes raising the number of H-1B visas to 115,000 and exempting entirely those with advanced degrees in science, tech or engineering. There's already an exemption for 20,000 workers with master's degrees or above.

President Bush supports raising the visa cap, making that point again last week in India, whose software industry has pressed the U.S. to loosen visa quotas.

Even if the Senate passes this recent bill, it could face stiff opposition in the House, which includes strong foes of increased immigration.

Groups like the IEEE-USA, which represents U.S. engineers, oppose raising the cap, saying the visas cost Americans jobs and pay.

"U.S. workers do get displaced by easier access to foreign labor, particularly those willing to work for less," said Vin O'Neill, IEEE-USA's senior legislative representative.

Studies aiming to assess the impact of skilled worker visas on tech pay have been mixed. A 2003 Atlanta Federal Reserve analysis of 2001 data found "little support for claims that the program has a negative impact on wages."

But the Center for Immigration Studies, which favors stiff immigration limits, released a report in December concluding H-1B visa holders are paid less than their U.S. counterparts.

Still, the hard sciences do pay well in the U.S., and raises have tracked the national average.

Median pay for mathematicians and scientists has risen at an average 3.8% a year since 1998 vs. 3.6% for all skilled white collar workers, says the Labor Department.

Raises for electrical engineers, which slowed to under 2% in 2001-02, have averaged 3.6% over the longer span.

U.S. employers admit that if they can't obtain a visa for a candidate they want to hire, often they'll renew the job search.

But that's not all. The last time HP (HPQ) faced low visa caps, the tech giant told project managers to consider having the foreign engineer work remotely or moving the entire project outside the U.S., said Nicolett.

Foreigners Get Doctorates

Employers recruit heavily from U.S. campuses. But more than 50% of all U.S. doctoral degree holders in computer sciences, civil engineering and electrical engineering are to the foreign-born, according to the National Science Foundation.

In sharp contrast to America's ambivalent attitude toward immigrants, other countries such as Canada are actively wooing skilled foreign workers.

Canada's consulate in Los Angeles estimates that 95% of applications to live permanently in Canada that it processes are for non-U.S. citizens. And 75%-80% have H-1B visas, many with advanced degrees.

Despite the hassles, the next generation of scientists and engineers keep coming to the U.S. Many stay, drawn by pay and jobs.

"If I lose my job here, it's difficult to find another," said Chandroth about Toronto. While the market has improved, job opportunities are "much, much less."

Notably, first-time foreign grad students in the U.S. rose 1% in 2005, said the Council of Graduate Schools. They had fallen for several years as visa rules tightened after 9-11.

http://www.investors.com/images/editimg/general030906.gif

learning01
03-17-2006, 06:35 PM
LCCR: Frist Immigration Bill Violates Good Faith Senate Bipartisanship
Civil Rights Coalition Cautions Against Sidestepping Judiciary Committee
Wade Henderson, the executive director of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR), the nation's oldest, largest, and most diverse civil and human rights coalition, released the following statement in response to Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist's introduction of S. 2454, the "Secure America's Borders Act," which takes the same divisive approach as the House took when it passed the controversial H.R. 4437:

"The civil rights community is surprised that Senator Frist would try to bypass the Senate Judiciary Committee which is working in good faith to produce a bipartisan and comprehensive immigration bill.

"Senator Frist's bill would instantly criminalize 11 million hardworking immigrants and those who help them. At the same time it would do little to improve our national security. This is not a bill that reflects positively on a nation built by immigrants. It is neither compassionate, nor does it fairly resolve the underlying problems that deserve to be debated and acted upon by the Senate Judiciary Committee."

http://www.civilrights.org/issues/immigration/details.cfm?id=41397

learning01
03-17-2006, 06:40 PM
House Warns Senate Against Amnesty
By: Ivy J. Sellers, Posted 03/17/06, 03:34 PM

Seventy-three members of the U.S. House of Representatives told the Senate yesterday in a letter to Senate Judiciary Chairman Arlen Specter (R.-Pa.) that they will not stand for amnesty of illegal aliens. Here's an excerpt from today's story in the Washington Times:
..........................
Read it here in full.
http://www.humaneventsonline.com/blog-detail.php?id=13338

learning01
03-17-2006, 06:52 PM
Looks like the heat of discussions and tempo of Frist bill is picking up. Good for us.
...............

Backlogs. Paper work stacked. Short staffed. Applications piled high. Screening lapses. Incorrect decision making. Faulty approvals

Imagine this: US government “found a 30 percent fraud rate among religious worker applications and ‘the assessment also uncovered one case where law enforcement had identified an applicant as a suspected terrorist.’”

Still the US Congress and President debate the guest-worker program. Mr. Bush asks for $247 million to plan the program that won’t be here until 2011—if then.

Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Iowa Republican, said “that senators would ‘be shocked if you learned about the internal fraud and abuse at the Citizenship and Immigration Service. Officials are being bribed. Visas are being given away. Green cards are being sold ’”

........
http://americandaily.com/article/12425

eb_retrogession
03-17-2006, 07:39 PM
Illegal Detour
Thinking reasonably about immigration.
By Ramesh Ponnuru
National Review, March 27, 2006

Illegal immigration is not a big problem in America. Okay, let me amend that before pots and pans and worse things come flying at me. America has some serious immigration problems, but they are not distinctively problems of illegal immigration. If we focus narrowly on illegal immigration, we are likely to come up with counterproductive solutions.

Almost all of the things that cause people to complain about illegal immigration are true of much legal immigration as well. If your worry is that illegal immigrants tend to raise government spending, for example, then you ought to be worried about legal immigrants, too. Half of legal immigrants have not gone past high school. Like illegal immigrants, they cost federal and state governments billions of dollars each year.
. . .
http://www.nationalreview.com/ponnuru/ponnuru200603170753.asp

eb_retrogession
03-17-2006, 07:46 PM
Why Do Illegals Outnumber H1-Bs?
Investors.com, March 13, 2006

Some 100,000 demonstrators marched through Chicago last week to oppose a tightening of immigration laws. We're a nation of immigrants, they noted. But will it be a nation of busboys or physicists?
. . .
http://www.investors.com/editorial/IBDArticles.asp?artsec=20&artnum=3&issue=20060315

MerciesOfInjustices
03-17-2006, 11:49 PM
Here's an article that writes how the same things are being rehashed to a certain extent. http://dailybulletin.com/search/ci_3610139
Heck, even retrogression happened before and was relieved by legislation!

Proposed migrant reforms not new
By Mason Stockstill, Staff Writer

As debate over a contested immigration bill grinds slowly through a Senate committee, observers said it grows more likely that the only provisions remaining when the final vote arrives will be ones already enacted by previous legislation.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has spent weeks considering a border-security bill approved in December by the House. That legislation included stringent enforcement provisions such as stiffer fines for migrant smugglers and making it a crime to assist an illegal immigrant in any way.

The Senate is widely expected to adopt a softer version of the House's hard-edged bill. The committee has largely accepted a proposal that would allow illegal immigrants already in the country to work their way toward legal status.

"This is a very complicated bill," said Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., who is chairman of the committee. "And I think we have to get it done right."

To anyone who follows U.S. immigration policy, parts of the bill as it currently exists look quite familiar. Among other provisions, it calls for beefing up the Border Patrol by 10,000 officers, requiring employers to make sure they don't hire undocumented workers and ending the "catch and release" practice toward illegal immigrants from countries other than Mexico.

All of those plans have already been put in place, either by previous legislation or the executive decision of top bureaucrats. The fact that the same ideas keep coming back doesn't bode well for realistic reform, said Andy Ramirez, an activist and head of the Chino-based Friends of the Border Patrol.

"The reality is this administration doesn't want to reinforce and fix the border problem," Ramirez said. "They don't want to tell Mexico, `Stop sending us your illegals and start creating jobs.' They have no interest in this."

Requiring U.S. companies to verify the eligibility of new workers, and issuing fines to businesses that hire illegal immigrants, is a policy that dates back to 1986 and the Immigration Reform and Control Act.

Yet enforcement of the law has gone from weak to virtually nonexistent. For example, in 1987 and 1988, federal officials issued thousands of fines to companies that were employing undocumented immigrants. By 2000, the number had dwindled to 180; in 2004, it was zero.

Similarly, the committee last week approved a revision to the bill that would authorize the hiring of 10,000 more Border Patrol officers, doubling the agency's strength in the field.

That's the same number of new Border Patrol officers who were supposed to be hired over a five-year span beginning last year, after Congress passed legislation to overhaul the nation's intelligence system. But President Bush's budget proposal only included funding for 200 new officers.

Even if 10,000 agents were hired over five years, once the dropout rate at the training academy is taken into account, that wouldn't be enough, Ramirez said.

"That's a nice number to sell to the public, but it's very disingenuous," he said. "Those numbers will not meet attrition rates."

The bill also calls for border-crossers from countries other than Mexico to be deported immediately after their capture. In recent years, those illegal immigrants were released into the United States and ordered to appear at a deportation hearing, to which most never showed up.

The so-called "catch and release" practice was already officially halted last year, when Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff announced plans to move detained border-crossers through the deportation process more quickly. But some agents say it continues.

With so many proposals that are essentially policy retreads, many senators hope that more outside-the-box ideas will gain enough traction to succeed. One proposal to let illegal immigrants become legal residents and eventually citizens -- an impossibility under existing law -- is building steam in the committee.

The proposal, from Sens. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., and John McCain, R-Ariz., would allow immigrants in the United States illegally to obtain a nonimmigrant visa good for six years. They would have to undergo a background check and pay a $1,000 fine after admitting they entered the country without proper documentation.

After six years, those immigrants could apply for a green card -- which can later make them eligible for citizenship -- if they are learning English and pay back taxes plus another $1,000 fine.

Its supporters say it's a good sign that the Kennedy-McCain proposal was accepted by many committee members. Frank Sharry, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, said focusing on enforcement options alone would be a mistake.

"Creating consensus on an issue more closely associated with conflict is a great achievement for Sen. Specter," Sharry said in a statement. "In the face of pressure from colleagues and the media to short-circuit their deliberations, the committee decisively indicated that they are committed to creating sound policy."

Estimates of the number of illegal immigrants in the United States range from 10 million to 15 million. More than half of them are from Mexico, and about 25 percent live in California, according to the Pew Hispanic Center.

The Senate is on recess next week. Majority Leader Bill Frist has said he wants the bill to reach discussion on the floor by March 27, and if the committee has not finished its markup, he will introduce his own version.


The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Mason Stockstill can be reached by e-mail at mason.stockstil@dailybulletin.com lor by phone at (909) 483-9354

apnair2002
03-19-2006, 01:34 AM
http://www.shusterman.com/pdf/s2454.pdf

Sourc www.shusterman.com

xbohdpukc
03-19-2006, 01:40 AM
http://www.shusterman.com/pdf/s2454.pdf

Sourc www.shusterman.com

make an educated guess how much business all these immigration lawyers are loosing or not getting with Frist's bill over Specter-McCain-McKennedy one.

apnair2002
03-19-2006, 01:43 AM
which bill senate is going to debate on March 27 th?:confused:

for_gc
03-19-2006, 10:33 AM
H1-B suspense will end this month

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1454190.cms

learning01
03-19-2006, 10:44 AM
From today's WaPo online ( and print edition)
........................
In an interview sandwiched between his meetings on Capitol Hill, Gates told me the "high-skills immigration issue is by far the number one thing" on the Washington agenda for Microsoft and for the electronics industry generally. "This is gigantic for us."
..........................
So great is the demand for such skills in the burgeoning high-tech world that in August 2005 the last of the visas available for fiscal 2006 were issued. That means a 14-month shutdown of the program, until October of this year. "It's kind of ironic," Gates told me, "to have somebody graduate from Stanford Computer Science Department and there's not enough H-1B visas, so they have to go back to India. . . . And I have people who have been hired who are just sitting on the border waiting."

The draft bill that Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter has been preparing for floor consideration would expand the annual H-1B limit from 65,000 to 115,000. By excluding dependents (who now are counted against the cap) from the total, it might mean the entry of as many as 300,000 people a year -- one-tenth of 1 percent of the U.S. population.
..............................
By David S Broder

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/photo/2005/03/26/PH2005032604395.gif

Read it here in full:
For Gates, A Visa Charge
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/17/AR2006031701798.html

mrajatish
03-21-2006, 01:04 AM
http://www.opinioneditorials.com/freedomwriters/cbusch_20060320.html

mrajatish
03-21-2006, 01:39 AM
http://blog.vdare.com/archives/2006/03/18/the-lesser-of-two-evils-immigration-reform-by-senator-frist/

People are not really ok with the Green card increase but will probably still accept it - anything viewed as amnesty to 11 million illegal immigrants will not pass,

waitingonlc
03-21-2006, 12:29 PM
“Maintaining America’s Competitiveness: Recruiting and Retaining the Best and Brightest Minds”

March 27, 2006, 8:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

Russell Caucus Room
325 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington D.C.
http://www.ucdc.edu/aboutus/eventdetail.cfm?event_no=442
http://www.ucdc.edu/faculty/Immigration/TechNet%20flyer.pdf

Forum on highly-skilled worker immigration policies and their impact on US higher education and employment. For more detailed information please click here.
Sponsored by TechNet, University of California Washington Center, UC Berkeley, and The California Institute for Federal Policy Research

Program:

8:35-9:05 a.m. Key Note Speaker: John Snow, Secretary of the Treasury (Invited)

9:05-10:20 a.m. Panel I: Education: The Foundation of US Competitiveness at Risk

This panel will examine what is behind the decline in attracting the best, most talented minds in the world to study in the US and its long-term implications for national security, higher education, and international competitiveness.

Moderator: Robert Berdahl
President-elect of the Association of American Universities

Panel I:

Stuart Anderson, Executive Director
National Foundation for American Policy (confirmed)

Victor Johnson, Associate Executive Director
National Association of Foreign Student Advisers:
Association of International Educators (confirmed)

Debra Stewart, President
Council of Graduate Schools (confirmed)

Ray Orbach, Director of the Office of Science, Dept. of Energy and
former Chancellor of UC Riverside (invited)

George Miller (D-CA, 7th Congressional District) (invited)


Talent Gap: Maintaining a Skilled Workforce that Advances Innovation and Economic Security The leaders of our nation’s most innovative companies agree that our current immigration system works against US-based innovation and our broader economic security interests. Issues to be discussed include: highly skilled worker visa and legal immigration policies; the challenges US companies face in recruiting and retaining the world’s best minds; the boom in competitive sources of skilled talent overseas; and proposals for immigration reform that will advance economic development, innovation, and job creation.

Panel II:

Craig R. Barrett, Chairman of the Board
Intel Corporation (invited)

John W. Thompson, Chairman and CEO
Symantec Corporation (Invited)

Spencer Abraham (Former Secretary of Energy and US Senator) (invited)

Robert W. Goodlatte (R-VA, 6th Congressional District) (invited)

Sandra Boyd, Compete America (confirmed)

12:00-1:15 p.m. - Conversation with Policy Makers: The Outlook for Immigration Reform:

Evan Thomas, Assistant Managing Editor of Newsweek Magazine will moderate a discussion among Senators Cornyn (confirmed), Specter (invited), Leahy (invited), Alexander (invited), Bingaman (invited), and Kennedy (invited), on immigration legislation that advances US innovation in higher education, employment and economic security. This session will conclude with a 20 minute Press and Audience Q&A.

RSVP elizabeth.victoreen@ucdc.edu

Andrea Hoffman, Director of Public Policy
TechNet
1717 Rhode Island Avenue, NW, Suite 630
Washington, DC 20036
Phone 202.587.4470
www.technet.org


********
********

Appu
03-21-2006, 02:50 PM
Everyone please send an email to c-span requesting that they cover the above event:

email: events@c-span.org

I don't think live coverage will be possible because there will be too many things going on in the house and the senate on the 27th. But they should be able to do it late evening.

We cannot underestimate the power of c-span - a lot of people watching it are very politically active folks and at least some of them will speak in our favor with their reps.

Appu
03-21-2006, 03:01 PM
From today's WaPo online ( and print edition)
........................
In an interview sandwiched between his meetings on Capitol Hill, Gates told me the "high-skills immigration issue is by far the number one thing" on the Washington agenda for Microsoft and for the electronics industry generally. "This is gigantic for us."
..............................
By David S Broder

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/photo/2005/03/26/PH2005032604395.gif


Methinks Mr Broder hath confused the H1B quota with green card quota! Anyhoo, this is very good for us. In December, he wrote about the up coming PACE legislation and Bush spoke about "competitiveness" in his SOTU address. Lawmakers value Broder's opinions. So this is good. I just wish he had been clearer and mentioned the permanent residency mess.

learning01
03-21-2006, 03:42 PM
... we will see the immigration issues allotted more time, brought forward, discussed threadbare and some solution reached. Though it is not my concern or any individual's, I sometimes get a distinct feeling that this Congress is NOT working hard enough. We can only do more prayers that these fellas do some real and hard legislative work, like the immigration bills.

Here is an excerpt from a recent ABC article:
...............
The average American has worked more than 50 days in 2006, but, so far, the House has worked in Washington just 19 days, a total of 118 hours. The Senate is not far behind with 33 days at the Capitol.
..........................
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Politics/story?id=1749611&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312

eb_retrogession
03-21-2006, 04:56 PM
Frist's Border Control-Only Bill Spurs Broad Immigration Deals; Judiciary panel crafting guest worker legislation with more enforcement
By Brian Mitchell
The Investor's Business Daily, March 20, 2006
http://www.investors.com/editorial/IBDArticles.asp?artsec=16&issue=20060317

Immigration foes' cheers turned to moans when it turned out that the new border-security bill proposed by Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., will not replace a broader immigration reform bill already in the works.

Frist introduced his own border-security bill late Thursday after leaking news of the new bill to The Washington Times the day before.

'Our country needs security at our borders in order to slow the flow of illegal immigration and make America safer from foreign criminals and terrorists,' Frist said in a Thursday statement.

The bill includes many provisions of the border-security bill that the House passed in December.

It includes beefed-up border protections, sterner penalties for criminal aliens, increased workplace enforcement and expedited removal procedures.

It does not include a guest-worker program, a hike in legal immigration or any form of amnesty for illegal aliens.

Frist Backs Off

When Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter, R-Pa., complained Thursday that Frist's bill would cause 'chaos' on the Senate floor, Frist's office promised to pull the bill if Specter's panel finishes work on a broader immigration bill by March 27.

'Unfortunately it looks like we're not going to get a clear shot at the Frist bill because he may withdraw it,' said David Durham, board chairman of the Carrying Capacity Network, which wants a moratorium on immigration.

The fanfare over Frist's threat to upstage Specter left some wondering whether Frist was just grandstanding for Republican voters.

The White House hopeful won a recent presidential straw poll at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Memphis, Tenn. But two out-of-state rivals, Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Virginia Sen. George Allen, drew more applause by standing against illegal immigration.

The contrast may have prompted Frist to move more forcefully on border control.

'Frist is in his last eight months in the Senate,' said Larry Sabato, professor of politics at the University of Virginia. 'He's much more interested in being a presidential candidate than majority leader at this point.'

And GOP primary voters tend to favor a crackdown on illegal immigration.

Deadline Spurs Action

Spurred by the threat of an enforcement-only bill, senators on the judiciary panel reached a compromise on key issues.

'The committee was turbo-charged yesterday compared to how it had been going,' Angela Kelley, deputy director of the National Immigration Forum, which favors more immigration.

That's kept alive the possibility of Senate legislation pieced together from three bills backed by panel members. All three contain some form of guest-worker program proposed by President Bush.

Specter's 300-page bill provides an earned amnesty for illegals already here, a guest-worker program and 1.14 million green cards a year for employment-based, family-based and student immigrants.

It did not include a border fence, an end to the visa lottery, mandatory work eligibility verification for employees, and other provisions of the House bill.

Tough Love For Guest Workers

Tougher enforcement provisions may be added from a bill backed by Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., in exchange for a guest-worker program more like that proposed by Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Ted Kennedy, D-Mass.

Cornyn and Kennedy have agreed on a compromise that would require illegals to return home before re-entering as guest workers. The government would waive that if the illegals' employers say they can't be missed or if they can prove a consistent work history.

'Anything can happen in the Senate,' said Caroline Espinosa of NumbersUSA, which opposes more immigration. 'It's very, very possible they'll do some form of amnesty or some form of guest-worker program. But in the end it really boils down to what happens in conference.'

guy03062
03-22-2006, 12:57 PM
I appologize if anyone already posted this but this organization (NAFSA) released a statement to support exact our cause!

http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=61646
======================================

NAFSA Statement: Immigration Reform and Attracting Foreign Talent

3/1/2006 10:34:00 AM


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To: National Desk, Economics Correspondent, Congressional Correspondent

Contact: Ursula Oaks, 202-737-3699, ext. 253 or ursulao@nafsa.org

WASHINGTON, March 1 /U.S. Newswire/ -- The following statement was released today by NAFSA: Association of International Educators on the national immigration reform debate:

As Congress considers a flurry of immigration proposals and the debate on immigration reform heats up on Capitol Hill, one issue has taken center stage: What must be done to ensure that our immigration system keeps pace with the global economy? A key part of the answer lies in expanding the United States' ability to attract, as President Bush has put it, "the best and brightest" from around the world. International students and scholars are a key part of the pipeline of skilled talent from outside our borders that fuels our economy, boosts our ability to innovate, and ensures our leadership in the global economy.

The reality is that today, prospective students outside our country have myriad opportunities for study, employment, and life in countries across the globe. Many countries are aggressively recruiting them and are adjusting their immigration and work laws to create additional incentives for them. People, like technology and information, are crossing borders with unprecedented freedom and flexibility. To succeed in attracting knowledge, innovation, and skills from around the world, we must, through our immigration laws and visa policy, create and support a climate that encourages the contributions of foreign talent.

Several key aspects of U.S. immigration law stand in the way of doing this:

(1) Current law requires applicants for student and scholar visas to prove that they have no intention of remaining in the United States after graduation. While many foreign students do want to go home after graduation, we know that it is good for our country that some of them want to stay here to use the knowledge they gained at our universities. AT A MINIMUM, WE MUST ACT NOW TO MAKE IT POSSIBLE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS EARNING ADVANCED DEGREES IN KEY FIELDS TO HAVE THE OPTION AT THE TIME THEY APPLY FOR THEIR VISA TO DECLARE AN INTEREST IN WORKING IN THE UNITED STATES AFTER GRADUATION.

In the long run, however, we must rethink the idea that the possibility that a student or scholar might want to stay in the United States should disqualify them for a visa. This concept is inconsistent with today's realities and is not an effective tool of visa policy. It assumes the fiction that all students want to permanently immigrate to the United States; it requires the consular officer to make a virtually impossible judgment call about a person's intentions in the course of a minutes-long interview; and it is a clumsy and unnecessary instrument for visa denial. Most significantly, it prevents the United States from benefiting from the contributions of foreign students who might want to stay here, whether for the long term or for a few years - not only those in the strategic fields we know are important for our economy today, but also talent from across the entire spectrum of academic study. We cannot anticipate the nature of the next crisis, nor the tools we will need to address it. Foreign graduates in all fields of study are important potential contributors to U.S. competitiveness, security, and leadership in the world.

(2) There are artificial annual caps on the numbers of visas for skilled foreign workers, which are reached early each year and leave many employers stranded in their search for qualified talent to fill key jobs. Businesses look to higher education institutions when they recruit employees, and they rely on foreign students, especially in the sciences, technology, engineering and math (the so-called "STEM" fields) to fill in the gaps left by the shortage of qualified American graduates. As we work to encourage more of our own students to pursue study and careers in these fields, foreign students are also a crucial part of the equation. WE MUST REVISE THE CAP SYSTEM SO THAT QUALIFIED, TALENTED FOREIGN STUDENTS WHO WANT TO WORK IN THE UNITED STATES ARE AVAILABLE TO U.S. EMPLOYERS THAT WANT TO HIRE THEM. Otherwise, this talent will go home -- or to another country that is more welcoming.

(3) The U.S. immigration system lacks the capacity to accommodate the international nature of scientific inquiry, academic collaboration, and business, putting us at a competitive disadvantage in the world. The very concept of "immigrating," as it is traditionally defined, is increasingly beside the point for students, scholars, and workers who are globally mobile. They may live in one country for a while, later move to another, and then return to their home country -- or follow some entirely different combination of these options. Temporary immigration status has evolved into a channel to permanent immigration and, indeed, the right path for many visitors to our country may lie somewhere in between. WE MUST REFORM THE U.S. IMMIGRATION SYSTEM -- GROUNDED IN CONCEPTS ESTABLISHED FIFTY-PLUS YEARS AGO -- TO TAKE THESE REALITIES INTO ACCOUNT. OUR IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES ARE SIMPLY TOO RIGID TO PROVIDE STREAMLINED, EFFECTIVE MEANS OF MOVING ACROSS BORDERS. If we make it too difficult for people to come and study, work, or live in the United States, we will lose out in the global competition for scarce talent.

In the current debate in Congress, NAFSA is particularly concerned about the potentially harmful impact of proposals that focus on enforcement-only changes to immigration law and present an unduly harsh face to the world. At the same time, a number of promising legislative packages include reforms that would bolster international educational exchange. They include the "Protecting America's Competitive Edge (PACE) Act," which creates a new visa category for doctoral students in the STEM disciplines, allowing them to intend to remain in the United States to work or to return home after graduation. The bill also exempts certain highly-skilled foreign nationals from the annual numerical limits on obtaining green cards. Similar provisions are part of a proposal by Senator Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), which the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to begin considering tomorrow.

NAFSA will continue to work with members of Congress and the administration to advance our conviction that welcoming international students and scholars is central to our ability to lead in today's world. International educational exchanges build connections of friendship and collaboration for the United States and attract the best in talent from around the world to support our economic vitality and competitiveness in the 21st century.

---

NAFSA: Association of International Educators is the world's largest professional association dedicated to international education.

learning01
03-22-2006, 03:47 PM
Senate to Address Immigration Next Week, Ready-or-Not

Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter (R-PA) has embraced the concept of immigration forgiveness (amnesty) articulated by Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Edward Kennedy (D-MA): when illegal immigrants meet specific criteria (such as returning home first) and pay fines and back taxes, they should have the opportunity to obtain a green card and pursue the road to citizenship. Specter has only one more legislative day to fashion consensus: Majority Leader Sen. Bill Frist (R-TN) plans to move debate to the floor the week of 27 March.

Frist is proposing (http://immigration.about.com/b/a/253995.htm) to raise the employment-based visa quota and deal with enforcment, not amnesty. High-tech firms (http://www.nriinternet.com/NRIimmigration/USA/2006/601_H1B_VISA_MAYduble.htm)
are pushing for H1B quota increases. Last week, Bill Gates told David Broder (http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20060321/1071291.asp)
that "high-skills immigration issue is by far the No. 1 thing" for the computer/electronics sector:
Since autumn 2003, Congress has limited the number of people admitted annually on H1B visas to 65,000. To qualify, a person must have at least a bachelor's degree and specialized knowledge and a job offer from an American employer. The visa is generally good for six years, with the possibility of applying for extensions.

So great is the demand for such skills in the high-tech world that in August 2005, the last of the visas available for fiscal 2006 were issued. That means a 14-month shutdown of the program, until October of this year.
The draft bill that Specter is shepherding through his committee would expand the annual H1B limit from 65,000 to 115,000, a move supported by President Bush. The House appears reluctant to address expansion when many Americans are calling for better border patrol, seeing no difference between illegals crossing the border and foreign high-tech workers coveted by the high-tech industry.

Another sign the current system is broken: a backlog of 3 million visa applications.

Read it here: (http://uspolitics.about.com/b/a/207656.htm)

learning01
03-22-2006, 04:22 PM
Since the news is picking up, I am trying to post excerpts or headlines with links.

1.
"It's hard to describe what's going to come of this," (http://www.landscapemanagement.net/landscape/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=314611)
said Craig Regelbrugge, senior director of government relations for the American Nursery and Landscape Association (ANLA). "What's happening is a lot of political wrangling."

While many consider the guest worker program (including H-2A and H-2B temporary visa programs) as a separate business issue that might come to a vote as part of another piece of legislation or independently (see related story), comprehensive immigration reform is making national headlines.
2.
Civil Rights Coalition Decries Frist's Divisive Bill (http://www.civilrights.org/issues/immigration/details.cfm?id=41535)

eb_retrogession
03-22-2006, 04:53 PM
Snow Doubtful About High-Tech Visas
The Washington Post, March 16, 2006
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/15/AR2006031502304.html

[first item]
U.S. Treasury Secretary John W. Snow, right, believes there is little chance Congress will increase the number of visas to let skilled engineers work in the country, National Semiconductor chief executive Brian L. Halla said.

According to Halla, Snow said it is unrealistic in an election year to expect Congress to raise the current annual limit of 65,000 H-1B visas. That's 'unacceptable because the pipeline isn't full of our own math and science whiz kids right now,' Halla said. The chief executive said Snow made the comment to executives during a visit on March 2 to the company's headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif.

learning01
03-22-2006, 07:25 PM
The Irish Echo Online reports that (http://www.irishecho.com/newspaper/story.cfm?id=17842)Specter buys time, keeping hope alive.
.................(from issue of March 22 - 28, 2006)
Hopes for a comprehensive immigration reform bill that will provide relief to thousands of undocumented Irish remained alive this week after the Senate Judiciary Committee sought, and secured, more time to consider proposals in advance of an expected March 27 Senate vote.
.....................
When the Senate convenes Monday, Frist's bill will be assigned priority given the seniority of its author.

Observers are hopeful that an agreed Judiciary bill, with McCain/Kennedy's earned legalization provision on board, can then be attached in its entirety as an amendment to the Frist bill or, alternatively, the critical earned legalization provision would be attached along with other portions of the Judiciary proposal.

Reform backers would then hope for a House/Senate reconciliation of each chamber's respective bill - again with earned legalization on board - before the Senate adjourns for Easter.
....................

learning01
03-22-2006, 09:31 PM
Lobbying efforts increasing to shape immigration reform legislation

Gary Martin
Express-News Washington Bureau


WASHINGTON - Immigrant rights groups, unions and restrictionists stepped up their lobbying efforts this week to shape immigration reform legislation that the Senate will take up next week when lawmakers return from recess.

Leaders with the AFL-CIO and pro-immigrant groups held a Capitol Hill rally Wednesday urging the Senate to adopt a bill that provides a path to permanent residency for "hard working immigrant families already here."

Linda Chavez-Thompson, AFL-CIO executive vice president, led a list of speakers who said immigration proposals in the House and Senate would criminalize immigrants and create a permanent underclass.
................
Read it here in full at MySanAntonio.com (http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/metro/stories/MYSA032206.immigration.en.4f37f3b5.html)

learning01
03-22-2006, 10:35 PM
Let the fireworks begin.

.................
Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he would "use every procedural means at my disposal" to prevent Frist from bypassing the Judiciary Committee. Frist, R-Tenn., has made clear the Senate will take up his proposal next week if the 18-member committee fails to complete a broader bill.
"If Leader Frist brings a bill to the floor that does not have the approval of the Judiciary Committee, it will not get out of the Senate," Reid told reporters at the San Ysidro border crossing, a few steps from Tijuana, Mexico.
Bob Stevenson, a spokesman for Frist, did not immediately respond to a call Wednesday evening.
....................

Read it in full in San Jose Mercury News (http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/14162755.htm)
From WaPo (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/22/AR2006032202317.html)
and 125 other news articles with same title.

apnair2002
03-23-2006, 08:04 AM
http://bibdaily.com/%2Fpdfs%2Fchasm_separates_.pdf

bkarnik
03-23-2006, 11:11 AM
The following is an excerpt from the transcript of yesterday's show. Just my 2 cents for general information. Unfortunately, nothing about legal immigration...

BLITZER: Turning now to the battle over the border, the Senate faces a fight over the fate of illegal immigrants. And the Democratic Senator from New York Hillary Clinton is now raising some eyebrows by bringing religion into the fray.

Let's go live to CNN's Mary Snow. She's in New York -- Mary.

MARY SNOW, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Wolf, it was a rare reference to the Bible in public debate, as the Senate gears up to tackle immigration reform next week.

Senator Clinton, speaking at a press conference today, is trying to block measures that were passed in a Republican-backed House bill, that, among other things, called to criminalize giving aid to illegal immigrants.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

SNOW (voice-over): Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton is using a dose of religion to blast what she calls mean-spirited legislation.

SEN. HILLARY CLINTON (D), NEW YORK: It is certainly not in keeping with my understanding of the scriptures, because this bill would literally criminalize the good Samaritan, and probably even Jesus himself.

SNOW: What's striking about the choice of words, say political observers, is that it is unusual for any Democrat, let alone Senator Clinton, to use religion in political debate.

LARRY SABATO, DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA CENTER FOR POLITICS: It is good for a Democrat to mention Jesus, because, in fact, in a lot of the states, Christians are a big voting bloc, and they do determine the results of the statewide election for president.

SNOW: Clinton and other Democrats say they are seeking a compromise bill to offset calls by those politicians who want to deport illegal immigrants.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist said, even if no compromise is reached on what to do about illegal immigrants already in the U.S., he will move forward next week on pushing for stricter border enforcement.

SEN. BILL FRIST (R-TN), MAJORITY LEADER: Our country needs security at our borders, in order to stop the flow of illegal immigration and make America safer from foreign criminals and terrorists.

SNOW: But Senator Clinton, for the moment, is focusing on the controversial House immigration bill and says, if the Senate follows that path, Republicans will pay a price.

CLINTON: We want the outcome to be that they are on the wrong side of politics, as well as on the wrong side of history and American values.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

SNOW: And, Wolf, political observers take particular note when Senator Clinton mentions religion, viewing it as a way for her to move more toward a moderate position and shed an image of her as being a liberal, a move they say not only necessary to win votes in the Senate to pass a compromise bill, but a move needed, should she decide to run for the White House in 2008 -- Wolf.

BLITZER: Mary, thank you very much.

The Senate minority leader, the Nevada Democrat Harry Reid, has been getting a firsthand look at the front lines of this immigration fight. He's spending the day along the U.S.-Mexican border at San Ysidro, California. He is joining us now live.

Mr. Leader, thanks very much for joining us.

Are you prepared to use every parliamentary maneuver you have in the Senate to block this Republican-backed legislation that passed the House?

SEN. HARRY REID (D-NV), MINORITY LEADER: Well, first of all, Blitz, the first parliamentary maneuver I'm going to use is to wish you a happy birthday.

And, so, happy birthday.

BLITZER: Thank you very much.

REID: But let me just say this.

If the president -- if the majority leader brings to the Senate floor a bill that has not been -- had a thorough hearing with the Judiciary Committee, and he's going to bring his own bill to the floor, dealing with only one of the problems we have with immigration, then, I will use every procedural means at my disposal to stop that.

America needs comprehensive immigration reform. I have spent the day down here with the people who are in the trenches, so to speak. They acknowledge that immigration is not one problem. It's not a guess-worker program only. It's not enforcement only. It's not only dealing with the 11 million people here who are undocumented. It's all of them. Now, we have to make sure that we deal with all of these.

BLITZER: You want these 10 or 12 million illegal immigrants here in the United States now to get on a fast track to gaining citizenship?

REID: I don't want them to get on a fast track to gain citizenship.

What I want is on a fair track, so that these 11 million people are not part of an underground, that we don't know where they are and who they are. I believe what should happen is that they should know English. They should pay their taxes. They should have a job. And they should earn it. And it won't happen quickly. But we need legislation in place to give these people hope.

Blitz, let's be realistic. We have to have good, strong border security. That's what real security is all about.

BLITZER: Do you think there should be...

REID: But we also need to make sure...

BLITZER: Senator, let me -- excuse me for interrupting.

Should they build a fence or a wall to prevent these kind of people from coming into the United States illegally? REID: Of course.

And when we finish comprehensive legislation dealing with immigration reform, that's what we would have, a better border enforcement program, a better -- a good guest-worker program, and a program of legalization for these 11 million people, who we have to take care of.

Realistically, we are not going to deport 11 million people. We need to give them a stake in our great country. And that stake is to have earned citizenship. So, it doesn't come easy. It comes hard, but they will get citizenship.

mrajatish
03-23-2006, 12:32 PM
http://ia.rediff.com/money/2006/mar/23bpo.htm?q=tp&file=.htm

One of the most important areas: attracting more students into science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. Between 1985 and 2000, bachelor's degrees in engineering, math, and computer and hard sciences fell 18%, according to John Douglass, senior research fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, Center for Studies in Higher Education. America must at a minimum double the number of STEM graduates, from approximately 430,000 to 860,000 over the next 10 years, or risk losing ground to global competitors.

Seems Specter and Frist are doing exactly this, but only for Masters. Now, we need to tell them that a bachelors from IIT is almost equivalent to a bachelors from MIT, so why this discrimination?

Why is some one given Employment based greencard - because the employer deems that no American can do his/her job and that the employee is important for the employer long-term. There is no concept of "oh, this guy is from zombieland, so he/she will be better for me" I can understand Diersity lottery, family immigration etc having quotas as the principle behind these immigration is fairness for all. The same token does not apply for EB green cards. If it did, why not have a diverse H1B work force?

Country based quota is an anathema for Legal Employment based immigration and a person born in an oversubscribed country is not better/worse than anyone else born in some other country in terms of skillsets and the value they add to the economy and to their company.

It seems there should be some legal avenues to challenge this dictum in US Supreme court.

learning01
03-23-2006, 01:04 PM
..............
As Congress prepares for a showdown over immigration policy, President Bush urged lawmakers Thursday to have a "civil debate" that respects people of all backgrounds.

"Ours is a nation of law and ours is a nation of immigrants, and we believe that we can have rational, important immigration policy that's based upon law and reflects our deep desire to be a compassionate and decent nation," Bush said.

He urged a serious debate on the issues at a time when advocates on both sides have been playing to voters' gut emotions.
...............

Read it here in full: (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2006/03/23/national/w083005S34.DTL)
and 55 other news articles with the same title.

learning01
03-23-2006, 01:48 PM
The immigration divide

President Bush meets this morning with leaders involved in the illegal immigration debate, less than one week before the Senate tackles this thorny political issue that has divided the Republican Party.

The Senate debate on illegal immigration comes as the Minuteman Project announced plans to blanket the Southwest next month with 7,000 volunteers to help report illegal border crossings to law enforcement officials.

"We have shown, with a little political will, that our border can be secured and our nation can be safer," said Jim Gilchrist, the group's founder who lost a special election in December to replace Rep. Chris Cox (R-California). "It is time Congress heard the message."

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tennessee), who is considering a run for president in 2008, apparently has heard the message. He intends to bring his own measure to the floor next week if the Senate Judiciary Committee is unable to produce its own immigration bill. The Frist legislation includes many of the components already agreed to by members of the Judiciary panel. But similar to a House bill approved late last year, it does not have the guest worker program championed by Bush.

Frist's decision to bring his own bill to the floor drew a harsh rebuke from Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nevada), who told CNN yesterday he will do all he can to block it.

"If the Majority Leader brings to the Senate floor a bill that has not ... had a thorough hearing with the Judiciary Committee, and he's going to bring his own bill to the floor dealing with only one of the problems we have with immigration, then, I will use every procedural means at my disposal to stop that," Reid said in an interview from U.S.-Mexico border crossing at San Ysidro, California.

Meanwhile, at a news conference in her home state, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-New York) referenced the Bible in condemning the immigration bill approved by the House last year.

"It is certainly not in keeping with my understanding of the Scriptures, because this bill would literally criminalize the Good Samaritan and probably even Jesus himself," said Clinton, who is also weighing a bid for president.

In addition to the Minuteman Project, another group supportive of strict immigration laws is urging supporters to flood the Senate with telephone calls demanding action. Team America, led by GOP activist Bay Buchanan and Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-Colorado), does not support Bush's guest worker proposal or lawmakers it concludes will not uphold tough illegal immigration laws. But Bush does have a key ally in Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona), another potential 2008 presidential candidate, who supports the president's plan.

Bush's meeting with the immigration leaders begins at 10 a.m. ET. At 10:45 a.m. ET, the president signs into law a bill that authorizes the "Extension of Nondiscriminatory Treatment to the Products of the Ukraine." Tonight, he hosts an 8 p.m. ET dinner to honor Benjamin Franklin's 300th birthday followed by entertainment that begins at 9:25 p.m. ET.

Morning Grind from CNN:Thursday, March 23 (http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/03/23/sr.thurs/)

javaconsultant
03-23-2006, 01:57 PM
Guys,

Last night I was watching Immigration & Employment on CSPAN and came across very interesting discussion.The program was basically to discuss study of Center of Immigration Studies , a think-tank.
I was really surprised when one of the panelist mentioned that HALF OF THE GREEN-CARDS GOES TO PEOPLE HAVING EDUCATION OF HIGH-SCHOOL....

I was really disappointed with such incorrect facts.. Guys we need to make people aware that people getting Green Cards in Employment section are well-educated and contribute to the economy and to this great country !

Just my thoughts ..........

Berkeleybee
03-23-2006, 02:02 PM
Java,

If you look at our home page you'll see that only 16% of the green cards in 2004 went to the highly skilled. A pity maybe but true.

best,
Berkeley

Bharam
03-23-2006, 05:34 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060323/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush

As Congress prepares for a showdown over immigration policy, President Bush urged lawmakers Thursday to have a "civil debate" that respects people of all backgrounds.

"Ours is a nation of law and ours is a nation of immigrants, and we believe that we can have rational, important immigration policy that's based upon law and reflects our deep desire to be a compassionate and decent nation," Bush said.

He urged a serious debate on the issues at a time when advocates on both sides have been playing to voters' gut emotions.

"When we discuss this debate, it must be done in a civil way," Bush said during a meeting with groups pushing for changes to immigration laws. "It must be done in a way that brings dignity to the process. It must be done in a way that doesn't pit people against another."

Bush wants Congress to create a worker program under which participants could gain legal status for a specific time and then be required to return home. It would not provide an automatic path to citizenship.

"Our government must enforce our borders," Bush said. "We've got plans in place to do so. But part of enforcing our borders is to have a guest worker program that encourages people to register their presence so that we know who they are and says to them, `If you are doing a job that Americans won't do, you're welcome here for a period of time to do that job.' "

The Senate Judiciary Committee is considering a bill with a guest worker program. If that measure does not move forward, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist planned to push debate on his bill. Frist's bill sidesteps the question of temporary work permits and would tighten borders, punish employers who hire illegal immigrants and provide more visas.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. has threatened to do everything in his power, including filibuster, to thwart the legislation.

learning01
03-23-2006, 05:47 PM
.......................
During a meeting with groups pushing for changes to immigration laws, including two from Colorado, he urged a serious debate on the issues at a time when advocates on both sides have been playing to voters' gut emotions.

"When we discuss this debate, it must be done in a civil way," Bush said. "It must be done in a way that brings dignity to the process. It must be done in a way that doesn't pit people against another." The Colorado representatives were Charles Chaput, Roman Catholic archbishop of Denver, and Cindy Clark, director of human resources for The Broadmoor, a resort and hotel in Colorado Springs. Both support a temporary worker program for foreigners.
...................................
After the meeting, Clark said she was pleased to hear Bush's views meshed with those of the hotel industry.
"I was very impressed that President Bush ... understood the needs we have at the Broadmoor to have a guest worker program," she said.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is considering a bill with a guest worker program. If that measure does not move forward, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist planned to push debate on his own bill.

Frist's bill sidesteps the question of temporary work permits and would tighten borders, punish employers who hire illegal immigrants and provide more visas.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said Wednesday he would do everything in his power, including filibuster, to thwart any legislation not cleared by the Judiciary Committee.
..................
Read it from my state's Denver Post (http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_3632433)

learning01
03-23-2006, 06:03 PM
SENATOR KENNEDY RESPONDS TO PRESIDENT BUSH ON IMMIGRATION
1. .................
“I am glad that President Bush is focusing on immigration as the Senate Judiciary Committee nears completion on its work on comprehensive reform. I agree with him in the need for reform that include a rational and compassionate program for immigrant workers. President Bush should back up his rhetoric by saying no to the immigration restrictionists in his party who want to close our borders and yes to the many Americans, business and labor community members, Democrats and Republicans, and religious leaders who want tough border security and an orderly immigration system that is consistent with our values.
...................
Read it in detail here: (http://www.losangeleschronicle.com/articles/viewArticle.asp?articleID=7170)
White House Briefing, March 23
2. ............
Q: Does he support the Frist bill that is coming..... (from White House briefing, March 23rd)
Well, the President is committed to comprehensive immigration reform. We've spelled out very clearly what our views are: We need to continue to take steps to secure our borders, we need to continue to improve interior enforcement, and we need to move forward on a temporary worker program. That's how you address this broken system and fix it in a comprehensive way.

Now, there's a lot of different ideas being expressed. We've been in close contact with leaders both in the House and the Senate, Democrats and Republicans, talking about how we can move forward. The House has moved forward on a bill. It didn't include the temporary worker program. The Senate is now discussing the issue. There are a lot of different ideas. There are a number of people that want to see a guest worker program put in there. And we'll continue to work with them going forward. But they know what our views are and our strong belief in comprehensive reform.
.....................
Read it here in full on Whitehouse.gov
(http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2006&m=March&x=20060323154336eaifas0.9560358&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html)

abd
03-23-2006, 07:01 PM
The Situatuin Room CNN 4-6 pm est

Why immigration reform could become the next port security
controversy and the next issue to divide Republicans. Tune in at 4 p.m.

learning01
03-23-2006, 07:23 PM
Keep your ears to the ground and hear carefully. If an opportunity presents, leagal immigration covered, not covered, adequately covered etc, be ready to send an email from your private email.
In this thread about (http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showthread.php?t=372) Suggestions for Organizations to Contact , I am posting media contact emails. I had also posted a generic word template, in which you have plug in anchor name, your name, program name, your full name and phone number(if you can). The same is attached here:

Here is their contact email:
Situation Room Wolf Blitzer wolf@cnn.com
The Situatuin Room CNN 4-6 pm est

Why immigration reform could become the next port security
controversy and the next issue to divide Republicans. Tune in at 4 p.m.

learning01
03-23-2006, 07:34 PM
Physicians for Human Rights (http://www.phrusa.org/campaigns/asylum_network/action_2006-03-24.html) have issued urgent action alert to oppose Frist's bill in total and certain provisions of Specter's markup.
.................
In response to pressure from Senator Frist, Judiciary Committee members are pushing to produce a deal on immigration reform and border security by March 27. In fact, on March 16th Senator Frist introduced his own immigration reform bill, S. 2454, which he described as "based on the consensus enforcement, visa reform, and immigration litigation reform" provisions from the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act. Senator Frist's bill contains some of the same provisions that put asylum seekers at risk.
..............
Read it in full at the link above.

learning01
03-23-2006, 10:28 PM
Bush restates desire for guest worker plan in immigration reform
BY DENA BUNIS
The Orange County Register
WASHINGTON - President Bush on Thursday reiterated his support for an immigration overhaul that includes a guest worker program and called on congressional lawmakers to conduct the upcoming debate in a civil and dignified manner.
"I urge people who like to comment on this issue to make sure the rhetoric is in accord with our traditions," Bush said from the White House Roosevelt Room after meeting for an hour with 15 advocates for sweeping change.
.........
Bush was joined at the meeting by Vice President Dick Cheney, Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove and Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, participants said. The participants included representatives from the U.S. and Hispanic chambers of commerce, lobbyists from the agriculture, hospitality and restaurant industries, and clergy members.
Read it here in full... (http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/news/politics/14171636.htm)

Summary Box: Taking Sides on Immigration
IMMIGRATION BATTLE: President Bush sided with business leaders who want legislation to allow some immigrants stay in the country and work for a set period of time.

OTHER SIDE: Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist said the primary consideration with immigration should be national security.

DEMOCRATS: Democrats like Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York say Republican plans like Frist's are unsympathetic to immigrants.
Link (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2006/03/23/national/w175728S50.DTL)

learning01
03-23-2006, 11:29 PM
Immigration Debate Is Shaped by '08 Election
By Jonathan Weisman and Jim VandeHei
Washington Post Staff Writers
Friday, March 24, 2006; Page A01
President Bush's effort to secure lawful employment opportunities for illegal immigrants is evolving into an early battle of the 2008 presidential campaign, as his would-be White House successors jockey for position ahead of next week's immigration showdown in the Senate.
................
Read in here in respectable (worldwide) WaPo:
(http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/23/AR2006032301785.html)

learning01
03-23-2006, 11:50 PM
Well, well, well. So we can hope, from the tempo of the discussion in the news media and from the politicians, that after all we will have some 'closure' in the immigration debate.

Here is a lead story from NYT online:

................
By ELISABETH BUMILLER
Published: March 24, 2006

....... He has lost control of his own party on the issue, as many Republicans object to his call for a temporary guest-worker program, insisting instead that the focus be on shutting down the flow of illegal immigrants from Mexico. It is not clear how much help he will get from Democrats in an election year.

The issue will come to the floor of the Senate next week, and the debate is shaping up as a free-for-all that will touch on economics, race and national identity.

..................
Follow it here in full (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/24/politics/24bush.html)

for_gc
03-24-2006, 12:16 AM
Thousands of demonstrators marched in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Thursday to oppose tough anti-immigration legislation sponsored by their Republican congressman Jim Sensenbrenner.

prabirmehta
03-24-2006, 11:30 AM
From the latest issue of Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2006/0410/094.html. Part of the article talks about illegal immigration and the other part talks about the difficulties Intel and other tech companies are facing in hiring legal immigrants. Discusses the Specter bill. Compares US immigration policies for skilled workers vs. UK/Australia.

mrajatish
03-24-2006, 12:48 PM
How come I cannot access the article?

learning01
03-24-2006, 12:58 PM
How come I cannot access the article?
I will try to post the gist here in a few minutes.
Oh boy, this is the most comprehensive writeup on the problems of legal immigrants. I am still reading to see if it touches GCs and retrogression. But swaths of paras are written, starting with employing illegal immigrants, then it moves to employment visas, red tap and delays and cost to the industry. Will keep updating.
........................
America's immigration policy is a shambles. "The current situation can only be described as untenable," says Craig Barrett, chairman of Intel Corp. (nasdaq: INTC - news - people ), which has a voracious appetite for chip designers. The U.S. does a brilliant job educating foreigners in our engineering schools, and then, during the recruiting season, chases this human capital away. Australia and the U.K. have a much better system: They come pretty close to stapling a visa to an engineer's diploma. "If we had purposefully set out to design a system that would cripple our ability to be competitive, we could hardly do better than what we have today," says Barrett.
.............
The resulting crackdown did nothing to stop the unskilled workers walking across the border, but it did choke off the engineers from India and China. Since 2001 Congress has whacked the number of H-1B visas from 195,000 to 65,000 a year. Separately, green cards--permanent resident visas that allow for work, among other things, and granted to noncitizens--are handed out at the rate of 140,000 a year. Rationing of these precious documents is done not by setting employment priorities but by trying applicants' patience and forcing them to spend money on lawyers. For employment visas the waiting period for an initial interview with the U.S. consulate in the home country can be up to 149 days. Homeland Security says it does 35 million security checks a year before issuing visas to workers, tourists, visiting lecturers and the like.
.................
Chipmaker Texas Instruments (nyse: TXN - news - people ) was trying to secure 65 visas last summer when the federal limit ran out and was told it would have to wait for many of them until April, when applications for 2007 are accepted, to begin the process all over again. That means advertising the jobs for 30 days to find "minimally qualified" U.S. workers, sifting through résumés, submitting paperwork to the Labor Department and trying again to lure talented recruits from abroad, a process that can cost up to $30,000 for each employee--and increases the risk that a company will lose foreign candidates it has its eye on, as Texas Instruments did.
....................................
The article closing is pessimistic. Her it is:
Business has warmed to his proposals. "We have talented people we want to hire, whom we've offered a job to--and we can't bring them into the country," says Pamela Passman, vice president of global corporate affairs for Microsoft (nasdaq: MSFT - news - people ). "We think Specter's bill does address the [H-1B] crisis."

So what are its chances? It's a complex, omnibus package with many wiggling parts. Nothing will be enacted quickly. The 1986 reform took four years, and that was before Sept. 11. Xenophobia and protectionism combined to defeat an honest airing about whether an Arab ally should operate U.S. ports. Immigration probably won't fare any better.

learning01
03-24-2006, 01:01 PM
.............
The president's plan would let millions of illegal immigrants continue working in the United States but that is not sitting well with some Republicans.
...............
The New York Times says the fierce Senate debate next week may touch on economics, race and national identity.
Pollsters expect Bush to try to rally public opinion as he promotes his plan, says the report.
.............
Read it in full here: (http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20060324-100524-1415r.htm)

learning01
03-24-2006, 01:27 PM
Quote
"We've scheduled two weeks of debate. We need all two weeks."
Amy Call, spokeswoman for Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist
............
The president is working hand-in-hand with employers who want cheap labor to clean hotel rooms, pick crops and do other tasks that they say keep their businesses competitive. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., says he understands those economic issues, but his focus is on the main concern voiced by the social conservatives — national security.
.............
Immigration Battle Looms In Congress (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/03/24/politics/main1435440.shtml)

learning01
03-24-2006, 03:55 PM
Students Walk Out In Protest Of Immigration Bill (http://cbs13.com/topstories/local_story_083142651.html)
(CBS) HUNTINGTON PARK, Calif. Students from Huntington Park staged a walkout Friday to protest an immigration bill before Congress that would strengthen enforcement of immigration laws, California authorities said.

Friday’s march comes a day before a larger rally planned in L.A. tomorrow, when immigrant-rights groups will gather to protest the legislation of HR 4427.

Ellen Morgan of the Los Angeles Unified School District said roughly 500 students walked out of school and split into two groups.

Some 300 students walked toward two other high schools in the area, she said.
.................

learning01
03-24-2006, 05:57 PM
(It is better to know how each of the bills/proposals are shaping up. Seems Sensenbrenner's bill is taking most heat in protests)

Immigrants march in Phoenix protest, L.A. planned (http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=domesticNews&storyID=2006-03-24T213707Z_01_N24276125_RTRUKOC_0_US-RIGHTS-IMMIGRATION-MARCH.xml&archived=False)
Fri Mar 24, 2006 4:37 PM ET
PHOENIX (Reuters) - As many as 12,000 immigrants and supporters marched through the streets of Phoenix on Friday in the latest of a series of protests in major U.S. cities that seek to stop legislation seen as punitive to undocumented workers.

One organizer in Los Angeles predicted "hundreds of thousands" would march through downtown on Saturday, and Chicago police on March 10 estimated that 75,000 to 100,000 rallied to protest proposed changes in immigration law.

In Phoenix, some 10,000 to 12,000 marchers took to the streets in a peaceful but boisterous action, said city police spokesman Sgt. Andy Hill.

Many of the protesters have focused on a bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives in December. That bill, sponsored by Republican Wisconsin Rep. James Sensenbrenner, calls for tough border security and enforcement measures and would make it a federal crime, instead of a civil offense, for undocumented workers to live in the country.

From CNN:Immigration legislation sends protesters to city streets (http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/03/24/immigration.protest.ap/index.html)
......................

nivasch
03-24-2006, 06:24 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060324/ap_on_re_us/immigration_rallies

pasupuleti
03-24-2006, 08:27 PM
http://www.immigration-law.com/

03/24/2006: Bush Meets Fox in Mexico March 30 and 31, 2006

* President Bush of the USA and President Fox of Mexico are scheduling to have a two-day Summit in Mexico and the pending immigration reform is expected to be the focus of the meeting between the two leaders. Currently the wind is blowing the other way against the comprehensive immigration reform legislation in this country and it appears to be the concensus of the media and public opinions that there is a slim chance that the comprehensive immigration reform legislation will be passed before the end of the year. Probably Bush intends to turn the wind around by scheduling a meeting with the Mexican President who can strongly influence the November election in this country and the Summit meeting can send a signal to those who must run in the coming election that the strong Hispanic community will remember all those opponents to the temporary guest worker program and earned adjustment of status program. We will see how this will play out in the Senate next week! For the news, read on.
* Employment-based immigrant community should probably send a flower (?) to Rep. Lamar Smith of Texas for the job well done to play a trick that S. 1932 should be handled as part of the comprehensive immigration reform to kill S. 1932 with the full knowledge that the S.1932 would become a hostage of the politically vulnerable other issues. It is deplorable that there were notable opinion leaders and websites in and outside of the country who were easily deceived and misled by this hidden agenda. Somebody should pay the price for that.

for_gc
03-25-2006, 11:50 AM
although bush is favoring illegals heavily,but at the end of his weekly radio address he acknowledged that by garnting amnesty would be unfair to who are waiting legally in line.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060325/pl_nm/bush_immigration_dc

learning01
03-25-2006, 12:57 PM
USA Today : Bush uses radio to push guest worker plan (http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-03-25-bush-radio-address_x.htm)
As for_gc has written, this is being now covered widely. I will do some self drum roll. I am continuing to write to article writers, pointing out their omission of coverage of issues affecting legal immigrants.
Since this is an bolier plate AP story, also reported at CBS-Dallas-Fort Worth (http://cbs11tv.com/topstories/topstories_story_084103919.html) and 200 other news sites.

sertasheep
03-25-2006, 01:46 PM
Learning01,

Writing to journalists would greatly help bring about awareness I think. I will be glad to help you in this effort.

you can PM me, if you wish.

Regards

sertasheep



USA Today : Bush uses radio to push guest worker plan (http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-03-25-bush-radio-address_x.htm)
As for_gc has written, this is being now covered widely. I will do some self drum roll. I am continuing to write to article writers, pointing out their omission of coverage of issues affecting legal immigrants.
Since this is an bolier plate AP story, also reported at CBS-Dallas-Fort Worth (http://cbs11tv.com/topstories/topstories_story_084103919.html) and 200 other news sites.

mrajatish
03-25-2006, 03:34 PM
Dear Correspondent,
The US Congress is currently proposing stricter standards for asylum applicants and additional funding for border enforcement as well as efforts to attract the best and the brightest from around the world.

This is inspiring me to write a letter on behalf of Legal highly skilled immigrants who are currently waiting for many years (6-7 years) to receive their greencards. A lot of these individuals incidentally happen to be from India and China. These individuals typically have Masters or PhD degrees from US Universities and are working for leading American corporations or universities. Skilled workers are a small minority of U.S. legal immigrants. Of the 940,000 legal immigrants in 2004, only 16% were skilled employment-based immigrants. About 40% of these skilled immigrants (about 60,000) had advanced degrees, or 5 or more years of experience after a baccalaureate degree. The impact of these workers’ contributions to American competitiveness belies their small number. They add to the process of scientific discovery, technology development, and innovation, which in turn leads to greater productivity growth. Greater productivity growth improves the standard of living for the U.S. population as a whole. Skilled immigrants not only contribute to the innovation process themselves, they also help train our own future innovators, thus ensuring the competitiveness of future generations.

In addition, all of these immigrants have come to US by dint of merit, and hard work and have gone through the rigorous process of getting labor certification (a certification to prove no American is available to perform their job duties). They are highly paid and contribute heavily to the American economy without the possibility of ever getting their contributions back (e.g., Social Security benefits which will not be available to them if do not receive Permanent Residency).

What is frustrating though is that all discussions of immigration reform currently revolve around illegal immigrants who break the law to enter the country and are a huge burden to the country's resources. I understand that it is probably inhuman to deport these individuals and US Congress needs to address this issue in a humane way. However, isn't it ironic that a group of less than 1/2 million legal Employment based immigrants who are fundamental to the country's future are largely ignored by US Congress?

We need some one to champion our cause and bring our plight to the forefront. Would you or one of your team members be willing to spend a few minutes talking to me about this issue - I can be reached at cell # or at mrajatish@gmail.com.

Thanks for taking the time to read my letter.
Raj
Washington, USA

learning01
03-25-2006, 04:06 PM
Thanks for a good write up. Two comments.
1. Try to personalize a little.
..like: I read your article/opinion titled _______________ at _________ (web site) on ---- (date).
2. I end like this:
On that note, I request you to research our issues and help us get some attention in the media that will help inform & educate the public about our issues. A good starting point is of the issues we face is here (http://immigrationvoice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=56&Itemid=25). The issues in power point presentation is here (http://immigrationvoice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=36). A good article about some of these issues is here in Forbes.com (http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2006/0410/094.html) (Alien nation dated Mar 24 th) is here.

Anyone can improve on these, but keep writing.

Dear Correspondent,
The US Congress is currently proposing stricter standards for asylum applicants and additional funding for border enforcement as well as efforts to attract the best and the brightest from around the world.
...........

mrajatish
03-25-2006, 04:17 PM
Learning01,
Can you edit my whole letter and post again - it will be helpful for others to copy and paste the letter and send it to media. Also, I am sending you a Personal message - we can talk a bit on how we can make the initial impact when we send letter to media.
Thanks,
Raj

learning01
03-25-2006, 04:18 PM
Immigration reform package on US Senate floor next week
Moumita Bakshi Chatterjee

Bill to open doors to highly skilled (http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/2006/03/26/stories/2006032603300100.htm)
-----------------------------------------------------------------

The cap fits
If the cap has not been exhausted during the fiscal year, it would remain constant.
For employment based (EB) immigrant visas, the Bill provides for an increase in the EB immigrant cap from 140,000 to 290,000

-----------------------------------------------------------------
New Delhi , March 25

The coming week promises to be an action-packed one for the Indian IT industry, with the US Senate Judiciary Committee scheduled to resume consideration of the comprehensive immigration reform bill that includes provision for a market-based H-1B cap with a visa floor of 1,15,000 against the current annual cap of 65,000.

While the Senate Judiciary Committee is reconvening to continue the consideration of the immigration reform bill, the Senate Majority Leader, Mr Bill Frist, has stated that he wants the full Senate to consider comprehensive immigration reform next week. To that end, he introduced his own immigration Bill, S. 2454 Securing America's Borders Act, that includes the H-1B and employment based green card relief as well as security and enforcement provisions (including employment verification).

These provisions are identical or nearly identical to those in Chairman Specter's Bill in Senate Judiciary Committee. "This will be the bill considered by the Senate if the Committee fails to pass a measure. However, if the Senate Judiciary Committee finishes its work, Senator Frist has said that he will allow the Committee's Bill to be substituted for his when the Senate floor debate begins," Mr Jeff Lande, senior Vice-President of Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), told Business Line from the US.

The Bill - which proposes to open the country's doors to highly skilled immigrants for science, math, technology and engineering jobs - includes a provision for increasing the visa floor by 20 per cent of the base, in case the cap has been exhausted in the preceding fiscal year.

If the cap has not been exhausted during the fiscal year, it would remain constant. For employment based (EB) immigrant visas, the Bill provides for an increase in the EB immigrant cap from 140,000 to 290,000 along with unused visas from the previous fiscal year, unused visas from fiscal years 2001 through fiscal years 2005 and any unused visas after fiscal year 2005. It also proposes to limit the EB-3 preference category to skilled and professional workers under the bill, and higher annual allotment at 1,01,500 of the worldwide cap up from 30,000.

It may be recalled that given the high demand for skilled temporary workers in the US, the existing 65,000 H-1B visa cap was reached even before the start of the Federal Government's fiscal year 2006 (which began on October 1, 2005), prompting organisations such as ITAA to demand a significant increase in the number of visas for the current and future years.

learning01
03-25-2006, 08:13 PM
By ESTHER PAN
Published: March 24, 2006
From the Council on Foreign Relations, March 24, 2006
Esther Pan is a staff writer for the Council on Foreign Relations website, cfr.org.
........................
What type of legislation is most likely to be considered by the Senate?

A committee bill with aspects of the three proposals above is expected to make it to the Senate floor the last week in March, although Senator Bill Frist (R-TN) has threatened to begin debate March 27 on his own version of the bill. Still, some analysts are positive about the developments. "I'm more optimistic than I was during the House debate because the Senate committee is working hard to seek consensus and is taking a responsible approach to the issue," says Deborah Meyers, senior policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute. Other experts agree. The Specter compromise is "a package that combines the better elements of the many bills," says Tamar Jacoby, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. .......................
What are the chances that substantive immigration reform will be passed by this Congress?

"It's very, very hard to say," Jacoby says. "[Senate Majority Leader Bill] Frist [R-TN] may not cooperate--he may see this as the first round of a presidential campaign" and seek to oppose McCain, a likely presidential rival. In addition, the legislation would have to pass through committee and debate on the Senate floor, before facing an even bigger challenge: the House version of the bill. "My guess is that the House bill and the Senate bill won't be able to be reconciled," Chamie says. "The political concerns have undermined any rational program." However, Meyers says, the Senate committee has "thoughtful members who have worked on this issue for a long time and have a lot to offer on it." All told, the chances for reform are "certainly possible, but you wouldn't want to be naïvely confident," Jacoby says.
Read it in full at NYT (no registration required for this): (http://www.nytimes.com/cfr/international/slot1_032406.html)

pasupuleti
03-27-2006, 12:53 AM
Here:

snippet from article
"And, perhaps most important, every year immigrants, especially the considerable proportion of highly educated and skilled immigrants, contribute an estimated $50 billion in free human capital to the United States. That means that our economy is boosted by the work of people we never had to pay to educate -- a group that includes Ghanaian physicians and Indian computer programmers (not to mention Dominican baseball players)."

http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/editorial/14191461.htm

apnair2002
03-27-2006, 01:41 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060327/ap_on_go_co/immigration

learning01
03-27-2006, 09:40 AM
..................
The Senate Judiciary Committee's 18 members -- including Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. -- are expected to meet into the night to finish work on a 300-page bill calling for beefed-up border security, a guest-worker program for foreign workers and a plan to put many illegal immigrants on a long, winding path to U.S. citizenship.
If the panel doesn't OK the bill today, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., says he'll start a Senate floor debate Tuesday on his own bill, which has no guest-worker program and mirrors a get-tough enforcement-only immigration package passed by the House last year.
.......................
Read it here in full: (http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/nation/14197262.htm)

abhishek101
03-27-2006, 02:07 PM
While it mainly talks about H1B it still talks about legal immigration.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114341277438308548.html?mod=rss_opinion_main

The Other Immigrants
March 27, 2006; Page A16

Lost in the heated debate about the future of millions of illegal laborers in the U.S. is that our system for admitting foreign-born professionals is also in tatters.

While globalization has increased the competition for international talent, U.S. businesses are frustrated by processing delays, long backlogs and especially the failure of Congress to increase the annual limits on visas for skilled immigrants. The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to resume its mark-up of Arlen Specter's immigration bill today. And the good news is that it contains long-overdue provisions for hiring more of the foreign professionals who help keep our economy competitive.

Under Mr. Specter's proposal, the annual cap on H-1B guest worker visas for immigrants in specialty fields like science and engineering would rise to 115,000 from 65,000. Moreover, the new cap would not be fixed but would fluctuate automatically in response to demand for these visas. We don't think any cap is necessary. But if a Republican Congress feels it must impose one, the least it can do is let market forces have some say in the matter.

Another important reform addresses foreign students who want to work here after graduating from U.S. colleges and universities. It doesn't make a lot of sense in today's global marketplace to educate the best and brightest and then send them away to England or India or China to start businesses and develop new technologies for U.S. competitors. But that's exactly what current U.S. policy encourages by limiting the employment prospects of foreign students who would rather stay here.

Mr. Specter would let more foreign students become permanent residents by obtaining an advanced degree in math, engineering, technology or the physical sciences and then finding work in their field. It's unfortunate that the U.S. isn't producing more home-grown talent in these areas, and the fault there lies with our K-12 educators and their political backers who tolerate poor performance. The reality today is that the U.S. ranks sixth world-wide in the number of people graduating with bachelor's degrees in engineering. Jobs will leave the U.S. and our economy will suffer if bad policy limits industry's access to intellectual capital.

Anti-immigration groups and protectionists want to dismiss these market forces, arguing that U.S. employers seek foreign nationals only because they'll work for less money. But it's illegal to pay these high-skill immigrants less than the prevailing wage. And employers are required to document their adherence to the law.

According to a new study by the National Foundation for American Policy, our broken system for admitting foreign professionals also contributes to outsourcing. Since 1996 the 65,000 annual cap on H-1B visas has been reached in most years, sometimes only weeks into the new year. This leaves employers with the choice of waiting until the next fiscal year to hire workers in the U.S. or hiring people outside the country.

"Many companies concede," says the report, "that the uncertainty created by Congress' inability to provide a reliable mechanism to hire skilled professionals has encouraged placing more human resources outside the United States to avoid being subject to legislative winds." Last week computer maker Dell Inc. announced that it hopes to double its workforce in India to 20,000 within three years. There's another such announcement by some company nearly every day.

This weekend's big-city immigration demonstrations focused on the debate over the estimated 11 million illegals already in the country. But the U.S. labor market has also long been a magnet for highly skilled and educated foreigners, many of whom attend school in America at some time in their lives. In a world where these brains have more options than ever in Asia and Europe, we drive them away at our economic peril.

May be we can talk to them??

prolegalimmi
03-27-2006, 05:13 PM
Here:

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0327/p01s03-uspo.html

techno
03-27-2006, 11:09 PM
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114347570002909088.html?mod=home_whats_news_us

WASHINGTON -- Against a backdrop of massive demonstrations by immigration advocates and pressure from the White House, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved legislation to create two guest-worker programs and a plan for legalizing the status of millions of immigrants now in the country illegally.

The measure is the most generous of several immigration proposals before the panel, and passed with the support of committee Democrats and some of the Senate's most conservative Republicans.

In accepting the measure, which among other things offers guest workers the chance to eventually become U.S. citizens, senators rejected another bill sponsored by two border-state Republicans that would have required guest workers and illegal immigrants to eventually return home.

Should employers face criminal charges for knowingly hiring illegal immigrants? Cast your vote in the Question of the Day.
FRAMING THE ISSUE
A closer look at the immigration issue as the Senate prepares for two weeks of debate on the proposed legislation.The bill passed only hours after President Bush made his strongest appeal yet for a law that would provide employers with enough immigrant workers to keep the economy humming. Appearing at a naturalization ceremony for new citizens, Mr. Bush attempted to head off arguments within his party that a border-security law must come before any effort to help immigrants or their employers.

He called a temporary-worker program "vital to securing our border" by providing a legal channel for workers and freeing up border agents to patrol for criminals and terrorists.

Even with the president's backing, though, immigration overhaul faces an uphill fight this week when it reaches the Senate floor, where Majority Leader Bill Frist may bring up a tough workplace-enforcement and border-security measure. Democrats said they might try to block the Frist bill on a procedural vote today unless it is broadened.

Any measure that passes the Senate must then be reconciled with a House bill -- pushed through by the Republican leadership -- that requires the government to build a fence across the U.S.-Mexican border and makes felons of illegal immigrants now in the country. House leaders have said they won't accept a compromise bill that includes a guest-worker program or deals with current illegal immigrants.

President Bush speaks on immigration reform, saying "No one should claim that immigrants are a burden on our economy because the work and enterprise of immigrants helps sustain our economy."The Senate-passed measure is largely based on language offered by John McCain, an Arizona Republican, and Edward Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat. Their temporary-worker plan, passed on an 11-6 vote, would grant visas to 400,000 immigrants a year initially. They would be able to bargain for wages, change jobs, unionize and would be allowed to travel home and return.

Separately, the committee passed a pilot guest-worker plan for agriculture workers that would be capped at 1.5 million workers and cut off after five years. That measure was passed at the insistence of California Democrat Dianne Feinstein, who said she feared that workers admitted under a general guest-worker program would spurn farm jobs for easier work in service or construction industries.

The committee also deferred to the McCain-Kennedy bill in its plan for dealing with an estimated 11 million illegal immigrants now in the country. Those people would have to pay a $1,000 penalty, pass a background check and get a work permit in order to stay in the U.S.

Those who worked for six years could apply for a five-year extension and after that, permanent residency and eventual citizenship, by paying another penalty and proving they have paid their taxes, held a job, are learning English and haven't committed any deportable crimes.

Republicans have been sensitive to charges that any measure that offers legal status to those who entered the country illegally is an amnesty -- an argument that's certain to roil floor debate. But South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham, among others, insisted "it is not a blanket pardon. You have to work for it....That's what America is about."

The committee left the key issue of worker verification to be hammered out on the Senate floor. That measure, requiring employers to check the identity of new workers against Social Security and Department of Homeland Security databases, ran into a jurisdiction squabble with the Finance Committee.

learning01
03-27-2006, 11:49 PM
introduce his own bill. Remember, this could be just gossip, so trust but verify. For my part, I could not verify this and provide a link.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114347570002909088.html?mod=home_whats_news_us

WASHINGTON -- Against a backdrop of massive demonstrations by immigration advocates and pressure from the White House, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved legislation to create two guest-worker programs and a plan for legalizing the status of millions of immigrants now in the country illegally.

.

baburob2
03-28-2006, 02:34 AM
good summary of today's proceedings from www.shusterman.com

learning01
03-28-2006, 08:55 AM
By SUZANNE GAMBOA
The Associated Press
Tuesday, March 28, 2006; 7:33 AM

WASHINGTON -- Immigrant supporters claimed their first major victory since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks after a bipartisan group of senators approved legislation that would give millions of illegal immigrants a chance at citizenship.

"It's a big day for us. We may not have a lot of big days, but this is a big day," Frank Sharry, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, a pro-immigrant group, said after the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a package of immigration and border security measures Monday.

© 2006 The Associated Press
......
Read it in full here at WaPo(free registration may be required): (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/28/AR2006032800371.html)
Or Here on AbcNews.com: (http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory?id=1775704)

learning01
03-28-2006, 09:17 AM
right now... the SJC bill will be discussed in the senate floor starting today. He is the co-sponser of this bill.

prabirmehta
03-28-2006, 10:05 AM
This article talks about cheap labor running out in the next 10-20 years... not exactly our area but interesting nevertheless. http://www.forbes.com/work/2006/03/27/arabian-diary-dubai-workers-cx_daa_0327dubai.html

learning01
03-28-2006, 02:12 PM
Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern may jet into Washington next week in a last-ditch lobbying bid on US immigration reform.
...
The Kennedy/McCain Bill, which would allow Irish illegals to eventually remain in the US, passed through the Senate’s Judiciary Committee yesterday and is due to be debated on the floor of the House this week.

Mr Ahern said tonight: “It’s doing better than we expected. Last night’s agreement represents a very significant and positive development in the debate on the complex and sensitive nature of immigration reform.
........
The Kennedy/McCain legislation would allow the estimated 50,000 Irish illegals to stay in the US and work while applying for a green card and eventual citizenship.

Read it here in full at Ireland online (http://breakingnews.iol.ie/news/story.asp?j=177519464&p=y775zxy7x):

learning01
03-28-2006, 03:31 PM
A Border War
Tom Tancredo is pulling the immigration debate to the right—and away from Bush.
Read it online here: (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12017855/site/newsweek/)

learning01
03-28-2006, 03:38 PM
I used to like CS Monitor a lot, as 'The Hindu' - the well know Indian news paper from Chennai (Madras), frequently used to quote CSM. This write up / commentary says the split in GOP could stall legislation. Take time to read it.

A GOP faceoff over illegal immigration

Immigration reform splits the party so deeply it could stall legislation this year.

By Gail Russell Chaddock | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

WASHINGTON – Senate majority leader Bill Frist and GOP Sen. Sam Brownback stood together on trade, war, judges, guns, energy, abortion, and war, but they are bookends in this week's debate on "earned" amnesty for illegal aliens - the toughest issue before the Senate this year.
They illustrate the rift that runs through both parties, but especially the GOP, which controls both the House and Senate. That rift yawns so large that it could keep Congress from passing any immigration legislation this year.

Read it in full at CS Monitor (http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0329/p01s04-uspo.html):

eb_retrogession
03-28-2006, 04:56 PM
South Asians join march for immigrant rights
The New Kerala, March 27, 2006
http://www.newkerala.com/news2.php?action=fullnews&id=32248

learning01
03-29-2006, 09:16 AM
Immigration bill gains support
by Dave Montgomery Washington Bureau
A comprehensive immigration bill that answers President Bush's call for a guest-worker program appears to have enough bipartisan support to pass the Senate, guaranteeing a legislative collision with an enforcement-oriented House bill, several advocates on both sides of the issue predicted Tuesday.

"We're in some trouble in the Senate," said Paul Egan, government-relations director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, which supports the House bill and opposes the guest-worker concept as a form of amnesty for illegal immigration.

Read it here in full: (http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/news/nation/14211033.htm)

learning01
03-29-2006, 10:27 AM
The New York Times
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006
....
Attackers of a smart, tough Senate bill have smeared it with the most mealy-mouthed word in the immigration glossary - amnesty - in hopes of rendering it politically toxic. They claim that the bill would bestow an official federal blessing of forgiveness on an estimated 12 million people who are living in the United States illegally, rewarding their brazen crimes and encouraging more of the same.

That isn't true. The bill, approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee in a 12-6 vote on Monday, is one America should be proud of. Four Republicans, including the committee's chairman, Arlen Specter, joined eight Democrats in endorsing a balanced approach to immigration reform. The bill does not ignore security and border enforcement. It would nearly double the number of Border Patrol agents, add resources for detaining illegal immigrants and deporting them more quickly, and expand state and local enforcement of immigration laws.
..................
Read it here at International Herald Tribune / NYT: (http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/03/29/opinion/edimmig.php)

485_spouse
03-29-2006, 12:18 PM
http://www.qando.net/details.aspx?Entry=3637
But the problem isn't "immigrants". Legal immigration and illegal immigration are two different things.

And illegal immigration has costs that legal immigration does not. Here in California the cost of providing Health Care, Education...and Incarceration to illegal immigrants is $10.5 billion. This cost is magnified by the fact that illegal immigrants do not undergo any medical screening prior to entering the US, which means that border states have much higher rates of diseases like tuberculosis and...wait for it...leprosy. Moreover, illegal immigrants utilize emergency rooms for primary care at a rate of 29%, which is nearly three times the rate of the population in general (11%). Of course, Illegal immigrants have to utilize the emergency room, since illegal immigrants make up 15% of the total number of uninsured people in the country.

485_spouse
03-29-2006, 12:23 PM
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/14210044.htm

egal immigrants in the United States view undocumented immigrants favorably and support legislation that would give them a path to citizenship, according to a national, multilingual poll released Tuesday.

These findings, pollster Sergio Bendixen said, contradict an oft-quoted belief that legal immigrants "harbor animosity toward undocumented immigrants for cutting in" on a long, backlogged line toward legalization.

This is an attmept to blur the distinction between legal and illiegal immigants.

learning01
03-29-2006, 03:44 PM
Republican split bars way to immigration reform
By Edward Alden in Washington
Updated: 2:12 p.m. ET March 29, 2006

The Senate launched a debate on Wednesday on the most sweeping proposals to reform US immigration laws in two decades, but divisions within the majority Republican party pose a huge obstacle to approval of the legislation in an election year.

Immigration reform, which President George W. Bush has been seeking for more than two years, has exposed disagreements among conservatives over whether low-wage immigrants should be seen as a boon to the economy or a threat to American workers and a drain on government coffers.
In an unusual procedural move, the Senate will debate two different bills that reflect both sides of that debate. Bill Frist, the Senate Republican leader who is trying to position himself for a presidential run in 2008, has offered legislation that would tighten border security and increase penalties on US employers who hire illegal immigrants but would not increase the annual quota of legal migrants.

That approach is popular in the US, and among Republicans. Recent polls have found that as many as 70 per cent of voters say they favour candidates who pledge to get tougher on illegal immigration.

But Mr Frist has tried at the same time not to alienate Hispanic voters, who are an increasingly important Republican constituency, telling a group of Hispanic educators this week that "this nation was made great by men and women who longed for a better life and came to America to find it".

As a result, he has pledged to allow a vote that could replace his bill with radically different legislation that is favoured by many Democrats and by Senator John McCain, who is likely to be one of Mr Frist's chief rivals in the 2008 Republican presidential primary.
.................

Copyright The Financial Times Ltd

jkays94
03-29-2006, 05:38 PM
http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/us/2006/03/28/intv.dobbs.salinas.affl

CNN's Lou Dobbs debates Univision's Maria Elena Salinas on illegal immigration. (March 28)

eb_retrogession
03-29-2006, 09:39 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/03/29/immigration/index.html

GCwaitforever
03-30-2006, 08:59 AM
Newspapers still do see the difference between people who are working here legally and undocumented workers.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12063843/

WASHINGTON - The Senate on Wednesday started a divisive debate on border security and an immigration bill that would create a temporary worker program pushed by President Bush, and could spell political danger for the Republican majority.

The outcome is far from clear, and senators are weighing the issue against the backdrop of huge protests across the country by largely Hispanic crowds opposed to a tough border security and enforcement bill approved by the House.

The Senate is expected to tackle a bill approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee that would create a new guest worker program and give millions of illegal aliens an opportunity to become citizens.

But in an unusual move by Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, lawmakers started with the Tennessee Republican’s own border security and workplace enforcement legislation that does not include a guest worker program. The plan is to later replace Frist’s bill with the Judiciary Committee’s broad immigration overhaul.

The move underscores the divisions within the Republican majority between those who want to tackle only border security and enforcement issues, and those who believe only comprehensive immigration reform that brings illegal aliens out of the shadows will work.

Hispanic activists and analysts say the Republican split on immigration could sabotage the party’s long-range effort to court the country’s fastest-growing ethnic group.

“I think it would be a mistake for the Senate not to pass a comprehensive bill,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, one of four Republican who joined Democrats to pass the immigration bill out of the Senate Judiciary Committee Monday. “I think politically it would be a mistake and policy-wise it would be a mistake.”

Some Senate Republicans support a comprehensive approach but do not like provisions that offer foreign temporary workers and illegal immigrants a chance for citizenship. They argue it would reward illegal behavior and put those people ahead of others who have been waiting for years to enter the country legally.

“It is not necessary to provide that path to citizenship,” said Sen. Jon Kyl, an Arizona Republican. “Many people believe it is amnesty. I’m going to call it a different name. I’m going to call it unfair.”

:mad: Feedback sent on this article:

The article lumps foreign temp workers and illegal immigrants together which is factually incorrect.

As a journalist, you are expected to be unbiased in reporting, and watch what you are writing for its intended message.

Foreign temp workers did not break any laws. They are here legally. And they can immigrate based on employment-based immigration quotas, which are legal.

By mentioning foreing temp workers on the same line with illegal immigrants, you are writing on behalf of anti-immigrant groups.

I will start a boycotting campaign for all products of MSNBC (MSN.com, MSNBC, Hotmail ...), if I do not hear from you.

"Some Senate Republicans support a comprehensive approach but do not like provisions that offer foreign temporary workers and illegal immigrants a chance for citizenship. They argue it would reward illegal behavior and put those people ahead of others who have been waiting for years to enter the country legally."

Alien
03-30-2006, 10:01 AM
GCwaitforever,
I dont see anything harmful in that article.It aint the view of msnbc.Its just a news report. Wouldnt it be best to let the IV media team handle these issues(if its one)?

jkays94
03-30-2006, 08:45 PM
http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/bestoftv/2006/03/29/dobbs.ramos.debate.cnn

CNN's Lou Dobbs and Univision's Jorge Ramos debate on immigration. (March 29)

brb2
03-30-2006, 11:46 PM
I will start a boycotting campaign for all products of MSNBC (MSN.com, MSNBC, Hotmail ...), if I do not hear from you.....[/B]

GCwaitforever most people speak out to exhibit their state of mind. No doubt you must have felt upset and blurted out. But do you think after receiving that type of letter the journalist will be your ally? I doubt it, if only anything you will have gained some one who very likely will go the other way. Moreover in this country nothing is gained by getting angry, threatening or posturing or raising one's voice.
My 2c worth:)

jungalee43
03-31-2006, 01:51 PM
Following article in Wall Street Journal throws some light on balance of votes in Senate on the Immigration Bill (as of yesterday evening.)

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114376287631112886.html?mod=home_whats_news_us

brb2
03-31-2006, 01:53 PM
It asks for a password. Can you please paste the article?
thanks

Following article in Wall Street Journal throws some light on balance of votes in Senate on the Immigration Bill (as of yesterday evening.)

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114376287631112886.html?mod=home_whats_news_us

jungalee43
03-31-2006, 01:59 PM
WASHINGTON -- The Senate plunged into debate on landmark immigration legislation even as supporters worked to consolidate the 60 votes needed to cut off any filibuster and win passage next week.

The opening day showed more passion than progress with major amendments postponed until Monday. House conservatives lashed out at the proceedings, saying the White House was jeopardizing Republican lawmakers by moving forward on such a sensitive issue this election year. But after a meeting with Mexican President Vicente Fox, President Bush said he was "optimistic we can get a bill done."


"We have a prodigious path ahead of us," warned Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter (R., Pa.).

Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) said the debate was a "defining moment" in American history.

"Are we going to continue a rich tradition of welcoming new blood and new vitality, or are we going to adopt an isolationist, protectionist attitude and policies that are a betrayal of the very fundamentals of this great nation?" Mr. McCain said. "By God, we have to continue those traditions of freedom and democracy and hope."

As reported by the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday, the measure would create new guest-worker programs and legalize the status of an estimated 11 million undocumented workers who are already in the U.S.


In deference to Majority Leader Bill Frist (R., Tenn.), debate had been confined to a much-narrower border-security bill favored by conservatives and the House. But at noon yesterday, Mr. Specter was allowed to bring out the broader Judiciary measure that will be the focus going forward.

Democrats believe they can deliver 42 votes for the bill, and Mr. McCain's office appeared confident that 18 Republicans can be found to bridge the difference and invoke cloture to cut off a filibuster. But Mr. Frist said last night that "cloture doesn't have the votes to pass now even if they had all 45 Democrats."

The White House's worst fear regarding the legislation is that it will collapse in the Senate, denying Mr. Bush the chance of getting the House to consider a more comprehensive approach to immigration.

Senators are finding it hard to find middle ground on the question of whether undocumented workers, already in the U.S., should be allowed to both legalize their status and eventually apply for citizenship.

"I won't accept a repetition of the mistake of 1986," said Sen. John Cornyn (R., Texas), speaking of an amnesty offered then by the Reagan administration and Congress in similar circumstances.

Mr. Specter angrily dismissed the "smear of amnesty," and said any illegal who comes forward now would be subject to fines, back taxes and an 11-year waiting period before becoming a citizen.

"I, right now, would not support the bill if it stays exactly the way it is," Mr. Frist said. He warned against pushing too fast for a vote on cloture before Republicans had had a chance to express themselves.

"Everybody struggles with it. I struggle with it," he said, and in addressing the millions of workers in the U.S., he urged proponents to look for a compromise short of an outright path to citizenship.

"You could design a separate class, not a track which is what they have now, which allows people to continue to work," he said. "There's no way you can take 11 million people and send them back either right now or three to four years from now. But you could design a system that doesn't give you a leg up at all to citizenship."

"Immigrants don't come to America to change America," said Sen. Mel Martinez (R., Fla.), who fled Cuba as a child. "Immigrants come to be changed by America."

Write to David Rogers at david.rogers@wsj.com

virtual55
03-31-2006, 02:44 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/30/AR2006033001968.html

virtual55
03-31-2006, 02:58 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2006/03/30/DI2006033001345.html

jungalee43
03-31-2006, 05:28 PM
Time has come out with a poll with this great result. You have a link from CNN.com to this article. I am just going to paste the URL as it is. But if that does not work, then access the article from cnn.com

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1179117,00.html?cnn=yes

To Admin:- I believe this is a very very major development and it is going to rock. If you think it right, then you can make this a new thread. I am just posting under News Article thread as per convention.

jkays94
03-31-2006, 06:40 PM
On Sunday: ABC's This Week

Senator Obama will be on ABC's This Week with George
Stephanopoulos this Sunday, April 2nd, to discuss immigration.
In Chicago, you can catch it on WLS channel 7 at 9:30 A.M.
(Don't forget to set your clock forward that morning for
Daylight Savings.)

Check here for local listings:
http://ga3.org/ct/v7SjpfS1hztA/

gc_bucs
03-31-2006, 07:15 PM
Just saw this at www.immigration-law.com. There is a link to the ammendment which is a Zillion pages long...Enjoy reading

03/31/2006: Full Text of Specter Amendments to Frist Bill

Senator Specter introduced his amendments to the Sen. Frist's bill yesterday. The amendments propose to strike and delete the entire text of the Frist bill including the title of the bill and keep the bill number S. 2454. Specter amendments represent the Senate Judiciary Committee bill.

ragz4u
04-02-2006, 06:15 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060402/ap_on_go_co/immigration

http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/02/immigration.debate/

eb3retro
04-02-2006, 06:33 PM
Can we write to this Assoc. Press reporter Mr.Hope Yen. He seems to cover lots of immigration issues. His email id is business@idsnews.com. Is there any covering letter or letter mainly regarding hard country quota problems etc so that we can request him to publish it in websites like yahoo immigration news. This could give us a nice exposure. my 2 cents..

gc_bucs
04-02-2006, 07:53 PM
Just saw this article: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12017855/site/newsweek/?GT1=7938

It doesn't talk about legal immigration

popoye
04-02-2006, 09:20 PM
His article named "road to dubai" dated March 31 2006 says

About the economics: the crucial divide isn't between legal and illegal immigration; it's between high-skilled and low-skilled immigrants. High-skilled immigrants — say, software engineers from South Asia — are, by any criterion I can think of, good for America. But the effects of low-skilled immigration are mixed at best.


I have the full article. Since it is a premium content. I am unable to distribute.

xu1
04-02-2006, 09:33 PM
And you'll find at least two blog sites posting the whole editorial by Krugman, legality aside ;)

admin
04-02-2006, 09:36 PM
Here is the link to Paul Krugman's article. It is absolutely legal to link to other sites I think :)

http://www.pekingduck.org/archives/003578.php

admin
04-03-2006, 11:53 AM
More news about the ongoing legislation.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060403/ap_on_go_co/immigration

GCStrat
04-03-2006, 12:01 PM
Guys and Gals

There is an Editorial page article by Ed Gillesspie of our famed QGA associates.

The article is about a Quarter page but I could find no mention of LEGAL IMMIGRATION issues such as RETROGRESSION, backlog, etc. :mad:

Not even one sentence! :(

IV folks - did you read that article?

Regards
GCstrat :confused:

thebullspeaks
04-03-2006, 12:13 PM
Legal immigration poised to surge - Bills could double number allowed

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060403/NEWS07/604030348/1009

April 3, 2006

BY MICHELLE MITTELSTADT and SUDEEP REDDY

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

Protesters pray during a walk for solidarity with immigrants Saturday in New York. The Senate is considering legalizing the nation's 11 million-plus illegal immigrants and creating a guest worker program. (FRANK FRANKLIN II/Associated Press)


Immigrants in the United States

The Pew Hispanic Center, a research organization in Washington, estimates that 11 million to 12 million illegal immigrants, including children, are in the United States. An estimated 850,000 illegal immigrants have arrived each year since 2000.

About 6.2 million of them, or 56%, are from Mexico, according to Pew. About 2.5 million are from Latin America, 1.5 million from Asia, 600,000 from Europe and Canada and about 400,000 from Africa and other countries.

There are about 13.1 million legal immigrants, not including naturalized citizens.


CITIZENSHIP: Immigrants can apply for citizenship five years after becoming legal permanent residents. They must pay a naturalization fee, pass English, history and U.S. government tests and be of good moral character.

GUEST WORKERS: They have employer-sponsored visas to work in the country for a limited time, usually two to seven years. Some can apply for permanent residency.

The House has passed a bill that would make all illegal immigrants felons. It would also make offering them nonemergency aid or assistance a federal crime.

The Senate is looking at two proposals. The main differences:

One would let them stay in the country for up to five years if they apply within six months and pay fines that start in the second year at $2,000 and rise by that much each year. But they would have to leave the country at the end of five years. They could then apply to return to the country as permanent residents or guest workers. As guest workers, they could work in 2-year intervals for up to six years, but must leave for a year between each 2-year period.

The other would let them stay up to six years after clearing a background check and paying a $1,000 fine. If they pay all their taxes and don't get into trouble, they could apply for permanent residency without having to leave. Critics call this approach amnesty, saying it's unfair to immigrants who get in line to come to the United States legally.

President George W. Bush supports giving temporary legal guest worker status to illegal immigrants who have jobs and providing them with a path to becoming permanent residents and naturalized citizens. They couldn't get in front of legal residents already in that process.

WASHINGTON -- From the corridors of Capitol Hill to cities across the nation, people are passionately debating immigration -- at least the illegal part. Almost entirely unnoticed is that the Senate may be poised to hike legal immigration in dramatic fashion.

Some estimate that bills pending in the Senate could double the nearly 1 million green cards handed out yearly, granting legal permanent residence.

The United States, which already welcomes more legal immigrants than any other country, would see major increases in green cards under both immigration proposals being debated in the Senate. The bills also would add tens of thousands of temporary visas for workers, from the high-tech industry to medically underserved areas.

Advocates say it's time Congress expanded a green card quota so miserly that it keeps some would-be residents trapped overseas as long as 22 years before they're reunited with their relatives in the United States.

But others question the drive to increase legal immigration, particularly as the Senate is considering legalizing the nation's 11 million-plus illegal immigrants and creating a guest worker program to bring in 400,000 more foreigners every year.

"There has never been a public opinion poll that indicates Americans want more immigration," said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Washington-based Center for Immigration Studies, which opposes higher immigration. "Obviously, if the public were asked ... they'd say no to doubling legal immigration."

Just 17% of Americans favor increasing legal immigration, while 40% say it should be decreased, according to a Pew Hispanic Center poll released Thursday. Thirty-seven percent said they believe the current level is appropriate, pollsters found.

But tackling illegal immigration without increasing legal immigration would be a recipe for trouble, said Doris Meissner, a senior fellow at the Washington-based Migration Policy Institute who headed the Immigration and Naturalization Service under former President Bill Clinton.

"You really have to expand legal immigration, otherwise you're just creating a whole other bottleneck in the system in the future," she said. That's in part because newly legal immigrants in many cases would try to bring relatives from abroad, and if legal pathways don't exist, illegal immigration would begin anew.

Krikorian and others critical of increased immigration quotas accuse congressional leaders of flying below the radar when it comes to their efforts to boost legal immigration.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, the Tennessee Republican who has crafted one of the two immigration bills on the Senate floor, has stressed the border-control and enforcement aspects of his bill -- not his proposed increase in legal immigration.

Likewise, there's been little focus on the virtually identical legal immigration changes in a competing bill that the Senate Judiciary Committee approved last week.

The way the bills are worded, it's impossible to figure how much they would increase legal immigration. Judiciary Committee Republican aides say the legislation would add 500,000 to 550,000 green cards each year.

That estimate is far too low, said Rosemary Jenks, director of government relations for Arlington, Va.-based Numbers USA, which is lobbying against what she said would "by far" represent the biggest increase in legal immigration in U.S. history.

"It's huge, huge, huge," she said. "I'm estimating it would double legal immigration."

In 2004, the most recent year for which U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has provided figures, 946,142 green cards were issued -- two-thirds for family reunification.

The Senate bills would greatly increase family-sponsored green cards, now capped at 480,000 annually, by exempting the spouses, children and parents of U.S. citizens from the total. That is expected to add about 260,000 green cards annually.

The bills also would boost employment-based green cards from 140,000 annually to 290,000, and would exempt applicants' spouses and children from the cap. Foreign students would be placed on a faster track for green cards.

And the Judiciary Committee bill would, for seven years, permit an unlimited number of green cards for nurses, physical therapists and others in jobs where the Labor Department says workers are in short supply.

Jeanne Butterfield, executive director of the American Immigration Lawyers Association in Washington, welcomed the Senate legal immigration proposals, pegging their rises at 550,000 to 650,000 green cards annually.

While acknowledging that the numbers "seem like a big gulp to people," she noted that legal immigration, as a percentage of the total population, would remain below the historic highs of the 1890s and 1910s. And many of the green cards would go to people already in the country, she said.

"It represents, I think, an understanding on the part of these congressional leaders that our economic system and our social fabric need to be adjusted to take account of 21st-Century realities," Butterfield said.

GCisLottery
04-03-2006, 12:59 PM
TIME, like most media, probably is not aware of legal immigrants plights.
I sent an e-mail to them when the issue titled "America's secret work force" came out.
Once again I sent an e-mail to them today.

Time has come out with a poll with this great result. You have a link from CNN.com to this article. I am just going to paste the URL as it is. But if that does not work, then access the article from cnn.com

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1179117,00.html?cnn=yes

To Admin:- I believe this is a very very major development and it is going to rock. If you think it right, then you can make this a new thread. I am just posting under News Article thread as per convention.

learning01
04-03-2006, 01:55 PM
April 3 (Bloomberg) -- Last week, the U.S. Senate began considering major reforms of immigration and border-security legislation, elevating a simmering issue into an explosive national debate. Of all the proposals out there, only one has its economics right.

Right now in the Senate, the two major plans being debated are from Majority Leader Bill Frist and Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter. Frist's bill focuses primarily on border protection, and has been characterized as an ``enforcement only'' proposal. Specter's proposal borrows from a bill that Senators John McCain and Ted Kennedy introduced last year. It includes provisions for temporary guest worker visas and for legalizing the status of currently undocumented individuals.
....................

Read it here in full at Bloomberg.com (http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000039&refer=columnist_hassett&sid=aRqmOcE7fSKw)

jkays94
04-03-2006, 08:33 PM
International competition and domestic policies will alter the availability of skilled workers from abroad. (http://www.shrm.org/hrmagazine/articles/0406/0406futurefocus.asp)

learning01
04-04-2006, 12:36 AM
GOP senators seek immigration compromise
Republican senators uncertain of support for a proposal to allow illegal immigrants with jobs to remain in this country reached for a compromise late Monday to bolster votes for the measure.

Meeting into the evening in the office of Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., the lawmakers considered allowing illegal immigrants who have been in the country more than five years or have other connections to the United States to remain legally and eventually seek citizenship.
.....................

Read it here online: (http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/14255368.htm)

jnayar2006
04-04-2006, 12:58 AM
Did any one catch GA congressman Tom price on Lou Dobbs tonight? Wondering whether he mentioned legal immigration and what his opinions were, considering he was one of the first congressmen to be contacted personally and made aware of our issues during the S1932 days.

cmathew
04-04-2006, 06:58 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/03/AR2006040301621.html


Fareed Zakaria on washingtonpost. He seems so proud of indian software engineers in U.S, but I dont think if he is aware what 500000 of the software engineers in U.S are going through to get GC. Everybody should email him with our plight.

gc_bucs
04-04-2006, 12:15 PM
Just saw this at AILA.org...
http://www.aila.org/content/default.aspx?docid=18990

That doc doesn't have sec 508 (the one with advanced degree provisions in it). Anybody know what's the status of Sec 508.

Thanks

learning01
04-04-2006, 02:12 PM
Guest worker supporters say they don't have votes in Senate

WASHINGTON -- Supporters of a guest worker program that would let illegal immigrants stay in the United States said Tuesday they don't have enough Senate votes to overcome objections from conservatives who oppose the measure on grounds it amounts to amnesty.
As negotiators worked on a compromise to let those who have been here longest remain, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said a majority in the 100-member Senate support his and Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's proposal to provide green cards to illegal immigrants after they've worked in the U.S. for six years.
But it takes 60 senators to overcome opponents' parliamentary tactics, and McCain said he doesn't have that many.......
About 30 Republican senators huddled for more than an hour Tuesday, but no consensus emerged. President Bush has championed a program that would give illegal immigrants a legal status to work in the U.S. but has not specified whether they should have to leave the country at some point.
...........
Read it here in full: (http://www.kristv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4724263)

Update UPI Story: Senators work on immigration compromise
WASHINGTON, April 4 (UPI) -- Members of the U.S. Senate are working on compromise legislation that would allow long-term illegal immigrants a chance at staying in the country.

Sens. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., and Mel Martinez, R-Fla., have been trying to adjust a Senate Judiciary Committee measure to make it more palatable to Republicans, The Washington Post said.

The measure, which had won widespread support from Democrats, would set up a guest-worker program for some 400,000 people a year while increasing border security and penalties for those who hire or help illegal immigrants.

Many more conservative Republicans oppose so-called amnesty, but the Hagel-Martinez compromise could temper dissension since it would allow illegal immigrants to qualify for a work visa if they prove they have been working in the United States more than five years, the Post said. Others would be forced to return to their home countries.

There are an estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in the United States, about 60 percent of whom have been in the country more than five years.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., has said he wants a vote on an immigrations bill this week.
Link: (http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060404-121422-7557r)

learning01
04-04-2006, 02:28 PM
US faces serious shortage of qualified scientists
The US once had a working formula for innovation. Inventors imagined products, factories efficiently transformed ideas into reality, and businesses adapted, creating millions of jobs along the way.

Yet an anxious America, with its intense security concerns about terrorist infiltration and technology leaks, along with fears about losing jobs to immigrants, discourages many potential innovators. Unless current restrictions are eased or a concerted effort is made to encourage science and technology education among American students, the US will face economic crisis.

Notwithstanding Microsoft, Apple or Google, several indicators point to the decline. First, US students have little interest in science or engineering as a career. Second, patents filed by US inventors have started to decline, whereas patents from Asia are steadily increasing. Third, US manufacturing employment peaked in 1979, and shop-floor innovation vanishes as companies make more consumer products overseas. Finally, companies scramble to secure more overseas talent, and a survey soon to be released by the Kauffman Foundation reports that 40 per cent of 200 multinational corporations plan relocating some R&D within the next three years, with more preferring expansion in India and China.

The US once countered such trends by attracting scientists from other nations. Snatching foreign help is easier than nurturing home-grown scientists - and other countries have caught on. So the old methods for recruiting foreign talent may no longer work.

For now, students from Asia, Russia and Eastern Europe keep US college math and science programmes afloat. About half of all science students are non-US citizens, reports the US Council of Graduate Schools, but applications from Chinese and Indian students declined by 15 and 5 per cent, respectively, in 2005 from the previous year. Australia, the UK, Singapore, even China, lure students who would have once studied in the US, and after graduation, stayed on to work. Alarmed about fewer students pursuing science and postdoctoral research, universities protest the visa restrictions and background checks.

But security measures remain bureaucratic, so universities also head to the countries with eager students. State universities of Florida, Texas and Michigan are among the dozens that have started operations in China and India. So students who would have once started careers in the US stay overseas.

US employers struggle to hire foreign scientists, too, because of fears of exacerbating unemployment. The US Immigration Act of 1990 formalised the visa program to attract professionals to speciality occupations, especially in science and math. Universities like Harvard and Yale, firms like General Electric and Bristol-Myers Squibb, and public research powerhouses like Nasa and Los Alamos recruit hundreds of scientists who hold the visa known as H-1B. India, China and Canada are the leading contributors of such employees, and many workers eventually apply for citizenship.

Yet politicians, buffeted by demand from special-interest groups, debate the value of the H-1B. So the annual cap has jumped up and down over the years: when the investment climate was hot, industry persuaded politicians to raise the number; in hard times, labour interests demand reductions. The cap was originally set at 65,000 in 1990. Amid fear of massive computer outages associated with Y2K, Congress swelled the cap to 195,000 for three years starting in 2000. Then the cap returned to 65,000, with special deals for Chile, Singapore and Australia, disguised with different letters and numbers. Education and non-profit research institutions have always been exempt from the limit. In fiscal years 2005 and 2006, visa caps were reached on the first available day.

Initially the biggest obstacles for foreign scientists willing to work in the US were the visa caps and fees of thousands of dollars, often not covered by companies. Since 9/11, visa applicants undergo a two-prong background check. First, the US Department of Labour certifies that no willing or qualified Americans are available for the position, and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the US Immigration and Citizen Services run the same screening performed for those applying for citizenship or permanent residency. For FY 2003, DHS approved 94 per cent of the applications.

The visa programme has its critics. Some complain that the programme encouraged a brain drain by removing talent from developing countries. Others complain that the arrival of foreign scientists depress US salaries.

More parents urge students to think twice before pursuing a science career. US unemployment statistics are hardly encouraging: According to the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, unemployment for engineers has risen from 1.4 per cent in 2000 to 4.3 per cent in 2003; for computer scientists, from 2 per cent in 2000 to 5.5 per cent in 2004.

The net effect of shutting the door to foreign scientists, the homeward journey by others, could mean less international recognition for the US. Half of US Nobel physics and chemistry laureates in this century were born in foreign countries or of foreign parents, and a recent World Bank report suggests that every 10 per cent increase in foreign graduate students leads to a 6 per cent increase in patents.

Of course, most patents do not have the value of electricity or broadband, inventions that revolutionise everyday life. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development notes that US creation of high-value patents has been stagnant since 1996.

High-value innovations do not emerge in a vacuum. Creating an environment that recognises creativity - and high-value invention - requires nurturing and respect. Closing the door to scientific talent out of fear and suspicion, discouraging scientists through neglect and low wages, is not how the US should alter the disturbing trends - falling numbers of students, scientists and patents - that will eventually erode prosperity.

Susan Froetschel is assistant editor of YaleGlobal Online.

Susan Froetschel YaleGlobal NEW YORK (http://nationmultimedia.com/2006/04/05/opinion/opinion_30001007.php)

GCisLottery
04-04-2006, 03:20 PM
http://uscis.gov/graphics/publicaffairs/uscistoday.htm

Apr '06

While Congress debates these bills, USCIS has been busy preparing for the potential operational realities of a temporary worker program and expanded employment verification system responsibilities. Stay tuned for further developments on this historic legislative debate.

Potential seed for another Blackhole

masala dosa
04-04-2006, 10:01 PM
yeh bring it on
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

jkays94
04-04-2006, 10:24 PM
Just saw this at AILA.org...
http://www.aila.org/content/default.aspx?docid=18990

That doc doesn't have sec 508 (the one with advanced degree provisions in it). Anybody know what's the status of Sec 508.

Thanks

http://www.immigration-law.com/Canada.html

AILA has released the Section-By-Section summary of the Judiciary committee bill where the summary of numerical limit exempt provisions for NIW and certain Advanced Degree holders were omitted. Our office has received a number of e-mails on this issue, and this reporter confirms that Section 508 is still part of the comprehensive reform packet.

PD073102VA
04-05-2006, 01:12 AM
Just saw this at AILA.org...
http://www.aila.org/content/default.aspx?docid=18990

That doc doesn't have sec 508 (the one with advanced degree provisions in it). Anybody know what's the status of Sec 508.

Thanks

It's on page 36.

learning01
04-05-2006, 09:41 AM
By SUZANNE GAMBOA, Associated Press Writer
12:27 AM PDT, April 5, 2006
................
"Are the Republicans going to stand up for comprehensive immigration reform or not?" Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., asked Tuesday.

Republicans had floated a proposal Monday night and early Tuesday to divide illegal immigrants between those who have been in the country more than five years and those who have not.

Several rank-and-file Republicans objected, and Majority Leader Bill Frist and fellow Republicans spent much of the day trying to find an alternative.
.....
Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the Democratic leader, blocked numerous attempts by Republicans to hold votes Tuesday on selected amendments. "We do not need a compromise. It's in our bill," he said and later set the stage for a test vote on Thursday.
Read it here in full at LATimes.com: (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/ats-ap_top11apr05,1,4987989.story?coll=la-ap-topnews-headlines)

From WaPo:
Immigration Splits GOP, Brings Senate to Virtual Standstill
A Split on the Lines of Illegal Immigration
Arizona's McCain and Kyl Exemplify Division Among Republicans Nationwide

By Charles Babington Washington Post Staff Writer Wednesday, April 5, 2006; Page A05

Disagreements over how to deal with illegal immigration are splitting the Republican Party as few issues have lately, dividing state congressional delegations down the middle and bringing the Senate to a virtual standstill yesterday.
Read it in full at washingtonpost.com: (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/04/AR2006040401625.html)

eb_retrogession
04-05-2006, 10:38 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/03/AR2006040301621.html


Fareed Zakaria on washingtonpost. He seems so proud of indian software engineers in U.S, but I dont think if he is aware what 500000 of the software engineers in U.S are going through to get GC. Everybody should email him with our plight.

I've sent him an email....thanks

apnair2002
04-05-2006, 11:36 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060405/ap_on_go_pr_wh/immigration

for_gc
04-05-2006, 12:41 PM
here is a video clip about "amnesty"
the link is at cnn.com's homepage under the section POLITICS

What is 'amnesty' in the immigration debate?

CNN's Lisa Sylvester looks at how politicians are using the word 'amnesty' in immigration debates.

jkays94
04-05-2006, 01:46 PM
Legal Immigrants: A Voice of Reason in the Immigration Debate (http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_custom.html?custom_page_id=289)

learning01
04-05-2006, 02:34 PM
By SUZANNE GAMBOA - Associated Press
April 5, 2006 posted 1:05 pm EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) - Conservative Republicans tweaked their alternative to a bipartisan guest worker proposal for illegal immigrants Wednesday as Democrats pressed for a vote that would put most of those in the U.S. illegally on a path to citizenship. President Bush urged swift action.

The latest counterproposal to a bill by Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., would base the chance of citizenship for the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the U.S. largely on whether or not they were here before a cutoff date. That date has not yet been determined.

Read it here: (http://www.nysun.com/article/30471)

learning01
04-05-2006, 11:47 PM
Apr 5, 2006 — By Donna Smith

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Republicans on Wednesday reached agreement on a compromise immigration plan to try to break an impasse over a bill that would give millions of illegal immigrants a chance to become citizens.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee offered the measure as an alternative to legislation approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee and now being debated by the Senate. At the same time Frist filed a motion to force a vote on the measure.

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada said Democrats would look at the proposal and he "hoped it is something that we all could support."

Republicans were deeply divided over the Senate Judiciary Committee bill which would provide a path to citizenship for some of the 11 million people living in the country illegally. They would have to pay a fine, pay their taxes, show good character and learn English, and it would take about 11 years to gain citizenship.

The Republican alternative would separate the population into three groups depending on how long they lived in the United States as of January 2004. Those in the country longer than five years would be eligible for citizenship along the lines contained in the Judiciary Committee bill, aides said.

Those who have lived two to five years in the United States would have six months to register and three years to apply for a temporary work visa or some other visa, aides said. They could live in the country legally during that time but would have to return to a U.S. port of entry to get the visa.

Illegal immigrants in the country less than two years would not be eligible for special treatment and would have to leave, aides said.

Republicans struck the agreement after President George W. Bush urged them to pass a comprehensive bill that includes his proposed guest worker program.

"This is a vital debate," Bush said after a White House meeting with Republican congressional leaders. "I strongly urge them to come to a conclusion as quickly as possible and pass a comprehensive bill."
Read it here in full here at abcnews.com (http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=1811260)

MerciesOfInjustices
04-06-2006, 12:02 AM
Democratic strategy seems to be just political posturing, per this article
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1180626,00.html?cnn=yes

These proceedings are turning to be very Machiavellian. Dems are going for the Hispanic vote no holds barred, but they are selling the ideas of National Security, and legal immigrants' rights!

Used to support the Dems - but these guys are neither here nor there! Come November, I don't think they will have the Congress, as they are thinking!

brb2
04-06-2006, 12:14 AM
NYT has published today's new development. Republicans are going to come back with their own version of the bill and it seems to me to be the end of the line.

I agree Democrats are only posturing. I for one, will be a life long republican once I get my citizenship. At least they are up front about it. Democrats will never support more skilled immigration to protect their union members.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Immigration.html




Democratic strategy seems to be just political posturing, per this article
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1180626,00.html?cnn=yes

These proceedings are turning to be very Machiavellian. Dems are going for the Hispanic vote no holds barred, but they are selling the ideas of National Security, and legal immigrants' rights!

Used to support the Dems - but these guys are neither here nor there! Come November, I don't think they will have the Congress, as they are thinking!

brb2
04-06-2006, 12:49 AM
New republican strategy for 4/6 - may work

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/05/AR2006040502038.html

Berkeleybee
04-06-2006, 01:46 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/05/immigration/index.html

jkays94
04-06-2006, 10:34 AM
http://www.washingtontimes.com/national/20060406-124606-5360r.htm

Senate Republicans will filibuster their own immigration bill today in the face of steadfast refusal by Democrats to allow amendments to the bill that many conservatives view as granting amnesty to illegal aliens.

learning01
04-06-2006, 06:05 PM
Immigration compromise unacceptable to conservatives (http://www.townhall.com/blogs/capitolreport/TimChapman/story/2006/04/06/192766.html)
Conservatives on Capitol Hill are not satisfied with the "compromise" immigration reform legislation that is now being considered on the Senate floor. With the likes of Harry Reid, Barack Obama and other liberals touting its usefulness, how could they be.

After the compromise was announced a group of conservatives including Senators John Cornyn, Jon Kyl, Saxby Chambliss, Jeff Sessions and Johnny Isakson held a press conference announcing their opposition to the proposed compromise legislation.

However, Hugh Hewitt, who earlier in the day expressed his disfavor with the legislation, now is hopeful. Hugh is told by Hill sources that there is a provision in the compromise for a fence.

Hewitt: (http://hughhewitt.com/archives/2006/04/02-week/index.php#a001838)
I am told by Hill sources the Senate compromise does indeed include the fence, which will make it a huge win for the Majority Leader. Seriousness on security and the immigration problem looking forward threads the needle and gives Bill Frist a big win to match Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney's...if the fence is real and makes it through conference.

I suspect Hugh's sources are staffers whose bosses have signed on to the compromise who may not be telling the whole story.

My sources contradict Hugh's. Rather than containing a comprehensive fence along the southern border, the compromise bill contains the same provisions inserted in the Judiciary committee bill for "limited Arizona fencing."

Token fencing designed to placate is insufficient to secure the support of conservative critics. I suspect Hugh would agree.

Others in the blogosphere are expressing their disappointment.

Q and O: (http://www.qando.net/details.aspx?entry=3677)
Since they've been here illegally for longer than others, they're rewarded with a path to citizenship. So the requirement is break the law longer than your cohorts and reap your reward.

Powerline: (http://powerlineblog.com/archives/013673.php)
A group of Senate Republicans, led by Majority Leader Frist, has reached agreement on a compromise immigration reform proposal. The proposal seems to conform to my concept of a bad immigration bill -- it provides the certainty of benefits for illegal aliens with only the promise of future enforcement.

John O'Sullivan at the Corner: (http://corner.nationalreview.com/06_04_02_corner-archive.asp#094352)
If this is a compromise, what on earth would a surrender look like? Details of the latest bi-partisan version of the Senate immigration bill are still coming out, but early reports suggest that any illegal immigrant who has been in the U.S. for five or more years would be on an immediate path to citizenship if the bill finally becomes law with that provision. How can anyone possibly argue that is not an amnesty?

John Hawkins: (http://www.rightwingnews.com/archives/week_2006_04_02.PHP#005499)
these Senators will find out that their illegal immigration deal cost the GOP seats. It could even cost them the whole Senate
I am told by Hill sources that there is a very good chance that this compromise legislation will pass. The votes appear to be there at this point. The vote could happen as early as tonight if conservatives who oppose cannot string it out longer. It is more likely that the final vote happens tomorrow.

nlssubbu
04-06-2006, 09:37 PM
I do not know whether this can be posted in this thread or not. This news is about an Immigration Official himself complaining about fraud and corruption in USCIS. :mad:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=1813823&page=1

Thanks

arindamb
04-06-2006, 11:39 PM
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/14281975.htm

learning01
04-07-2006, 12:25 AM
Senate apparent meltdown on immigration: Durbin's 14-hours of negotiations.

``We hoped that after all of the jubilation over a bi-partisan agreement, that we could move towards a process that led to passage of the bill.’’

---Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) after a 14-hour marathon day of negotiating on the immigration bill, near 10 p.m. eastern time, briefing reporters in the Senate Press Gallery.

In the morning, Durbin and a bi-partisan coalition announced a deal. In the evening, problems: a meltdown over process.



Two issues:
1. Democrats want to limit the number of amendments that can be debated on the deal. GOP opponents to the bipartisan deal have a slew of amendments they want to offer.

Durbin said an anticipated large number of amendments would be the equivalent of a filibuster.

Republicans, including Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who helped broker the bi-partisan immigration provisions, said this is an unfair demand from Democrats.

2. Democrats want Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Az.) to agree in advance who he will pick to be on an immigration bill House-Senate conference committee.

If the Senate passes an immigration bill, it will be vastly different from the measure the House passed on Dec. 16. The two versions would have to be reconciled if a bill is to get to the president to sign. A bill can be virtually rewritten at this stage.

``We are concerned whether or not this Congress will have the strength to go up against Jim Sensenbrenner,’’ said Durbin.

The reference is to House Judiciary Chairman Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wisc.) whose namesake bill the House passed on Dec. 16.

Sensenbrenner would be on the conference committee and he is against most of what the Democrats want in the immigration bill.

Congress leaves for a two-week Spring Break on Friday.
Read it here: (http://blogs.suntimes.com/sweet/2006/04/senate_apparent_meltdown_on_im.html#more)

Berkeleybee
04-07-2006, 01:11 AM
I do not know whether this can be posted in this thread or not. This news is about an Immigration Official himself complaining about fraud and corruption in USCIS. :mad:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=1813823&page=1

Thanks


Hmm. NumbersUSA has been hinting at this for weeks and months. Coincidence that this story appears right before the Senate makes up its mind about a bill? I think not! It is a totally planted story.

So Sessions will have a new topic tomorrow, and ask for CIS to cease operations till security issues are straightened out. Hmph.

Berkeleybee
04-07-2006, 02:27 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Immigration.html

12:48 AM EST Apr 7

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Putting aside party differences, Senate Republicans and Democrats coalesced Thursday around compromise legislation that holds out the hope of citizenship to many of the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the United States unlawfully.

''We can no longer afford to delay reform,'' said Republican Sen. John McCain and Democratic Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in a statement that capped weeks of struggle to find common ground.

But delay soon set in as party leaders became embroiled in a procedural dispute that threatened prospects for passage by week's end, if not longer. Democrats blocked votes on Republican amendments, and Republicans responded by accusing Democrats of trying to scuttle a bill they had embraced earlier in the day.

''I believe there are some people who would rather have no bill,'' said Sen. Mel Martinez, R-Fla., a Cuban-born first-term senator. He declined to identify any Democrats by name.

The seesaw nature of events was in keeping with the unpredictable course of the election-year legislation, designed to enhance border security and regulate the flow of future temporary workers as well as affect the lives of illegal immigrants.

President Bush said he was pleased with the announced compromise, and urged the Senate to pass legislation by week's end.

But the emerging compromise drew fire from both ends of the political spectrum. Conservative Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, likened it to an amnesty bill that cleared Congress in 1986, while AFL-CIO President John Sweeney said it threatened to ''drive millions of hardworking immigrants further into the shadows of American society, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation.''

Still, after days of partisan, election-year rancor, an overnight breakthrough on the future of illegal immigrants propelled the Senate closer to passage of the most sweeping immigration legislation in two decades. Both sides indicated the Senate might complete a bill when Congress returns from a two-week recess.

In an indication of the complicated political forces at work, officials of both parties disagreed about which side had blinked. But they agreed that a decision to reduce the number of future temporary workers allowed into the country had broken a deadlock that threatened as late as Wednesday night to scuttle efforts to pass a bill. The change will limit temporary work permits to 325,000 a year, down from 400,000 in earlier versions of the bill.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., characterized the developments as a ''huge breakthrough.'' Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada said he was optimistic about final passage, but cautioned, ''We can't declare victory.''

Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said: ''While it admittedly is not perfect, the choice we have to make is whether it is better than no bill, and the choice is decisive.''

Officials described a complex series of provisions:

-- Illegal immigrants who have been in the country for at least five years could receive legal status after meeting several conditions, including payment of a $2,000 fines and any back taxes, clearing a background check and learning English. After six more years, they could apply for permanent residency without leaving the United States. They could seek citizenship five years later.

-- Illegal immigrants in the country for between two and five years could obtain a temporary work visa after reporting to a border point of entry. Aides referred to this as ''touch base and return,'' since people covered would know in advance they would be readmitted to the United States.

-- Officials said it could take as long as 13 to 14 years for some illegal immigrants to gain citizenship. It part, that stems from an annual limit of 450,000 on green cards, which confer legal permanent residency and are a precursor to citizenship status.

-- Illegal immigrants in the United States for less than two years would be required to leave the country and apply for re-entry alongside anyone else seeking to emigrate.

Separately, the legislation provides a new program for 1.5 million temporary agriculture industry workers over five years.

It also includes provisions for employers to verify the legal status of workers they hire, but it was not clear what sanctions, if any, would apply to violators.

Berkeleybee
04-07-2006, 02:55 AM
We already know about studies that show that high skilled immigrants don't have an adverse impact on wages (see National Interest Fact Sheet in Resources section) now...


Wall Street Journal Immigration and Wages
Low pay does not justify a high wall.
Thursday, April 6, 2006; Page A28

THE COSTS of draconian immigration policies are obvious. Building a wall along a third of the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexican border, as proposed in the recently passed House bill, would swallow more than $2 billion, and it would not remove the need for squadrons of border guards to prevent people from coming across via tunnels and ladders. Forcing employers to get tougher in checking workers' documents, and clamping down on those who fail to do so, would impose a regulatory burden on businesses without necessarily doing much to stem the tide of illegal workers. It might be worth persevering with these policies if the benefits of lower immigration were truly significant. But at least one commonly cited benefit -- better wage prospects for low-skilled Americans -- is not as powerful as is often claimed.

It's true that immigration presents a greater challenge to low-skilled workers than in the past. The 1970 Census found that 63 percent of immigrants had been born in Canada or Europe and were generally well educated. The 2000 Census, by contrast, found that 48 percent of immigrants had been born in Mexico, Central America or the Caribbean, and that more than a third had less than a high school education. By 2000 immigrants made up over half of the workforce with less than eight years of schooling.


It sounds obvious that this influx must be depressing wages at the bottom: Double the supply of a certain type of labor and you push its price down. But attempts to measure this effect suggest that it's either modest or nonexistent. The most credible pessimist is George Borjas of Harvard University, who has calculated that wages for native-born high school dropouts are 7.4 percent lower than they would have been without immigration. But David Card of the University of California at Berkeley has compared wage patterns across cities and concluded that high school dropouts in cities with lots of immigration are no worse off. In low-immigration cities, it seems, employers don't necessarily respond to a paucity of low-skilled workers by bidding up wages to attract more of them. Instead, they may respond by investing in machinery that allows three low-skilled workers to do what six might do in a high-immigration city. Construction workers get extra trucks and power tools; gardeners get electric trimmers instead of manual shears.
Even a small impact on low-wage workers is alarming, given the rise of inequality over the past 25 years. But the question is whether to address that inequality by trying to stop immigration or to go at it via progressive taxation, larger public investments designed to prevent poor kids from dropping out of high school, or some other policy tool. Given the expense and doubtful effectiveness of border walls and employer crackdowns, progressive tax and social policies seem preferable. After all, to the extent that immigrants drive down wages at the bottom, they are driving up the inflation-adjusted wages of other Americans who get cheaper goods and services. Taxing the "immigration windfall" that flows to better-off Americans and passing it on to the less fortunate may be the best way to go.

Berkeleybee
04-07-2006, 03:38 AM
OK so I'm catching up on the papers. I'm no fan of David Brooks, rarely if ever agree with him, but this one was terrific and it made me laugh -- read the bolded bits and you'll see what I mean.

http://select.nytimes.com/2006/04/06/opinion/07brooks.html?n=Top%2fOpinion%2fEditorials%20and%2 0Op%2dEd%2fOp%2dEd%2fColumnists%2fDavid%20Brooks

Apr 6, New York Times, Op/Ed page
David Brooks

I had a horrifying experience in the House of Representatives last week. The House Immigration Caucus held a press conference so members could compete to see who was the biggest blithering idiot in the group.

"Anybody who votes for an amnesty bill deserves to be branded with a scarlet letter, 'A for Amnesty!' " one aspiring idiot thundered. There's "a foul odor that's coming out of the U.S. Senate!" bellowed Representative Dana Rohrabacher of California, who then went on to win the prize by suggesting that instead of using illegal aliens to harvest crops, we force felons to do it. "I say, Let the prisoners pick the fruits!"

Here was a seemingly mentally competent adult recommending that we force a largely minority population to go out in the fields and pick lettuce and cotton. You wanted to hit him over the head and scream: Is this ringing any bells, Representative Rohrabacher? Are we repealing the Emancipation Proclamation, too?

But this week the action moved over to the Senate, where pomposity generally has a restraining influence on stupidity. And indeed the major bill in the Senate, first conceived by John McCain and Ted Kennedy and refined by Arlen Specter, was immediately more sensible than anything that had emerged from the House.

The Specter bill acknowledged a few realities. First, a highly skilled nation like ours needs to import unskilled workers to do miserable jobs. Second, government is simply not powerful enough to hold off the global economy. You cannot build a wall around the United States that will successfully keep out the workers the U.S. economy demands.

The Specter bill balanced border enforcement with worker programs. It would build sluice gates regulating the flow of immigrants, not a wall.

But the Specter bill didn't have enough Republican support to pass. So an amazing thing happened. Senators tried to find a viable center.

Mel Martinez and Chuck Hagel forged a compromise proposal. McCain and Kennedy latched on. So did Bill Frist (who decided he'd swung too far over toward the anti-immigrant crowd) and the White House.

This proposal also recognized some realities, namely that the longer an immigrant is here, the more valuable to America he or she becomes. New immigrants are going through the shocks of assimilation. But veteran immigrants, even illegals, usually have excellent work records. They've put down roots. Their children are golden. These U.S.-born children go on to earn as much as children of natives, and pay taxes that compensate for the welfare costs of the first generation.

The Martinez-Hagel compromise would allow illegals who have been in the country five years to work toward citizenship, while imposing a higher hurdle for those who haven't. The measure was sufficiently tough to win support from 15 or so Republicans who couldn't support the Specter bill.

The Republicans were delighted with their progress, but then ran into trouble with the Democrats. At first they blamed the Democrats' lack of response on Harry Reid's desire to deny Republicans a victory. But then it became evident that the unions and other Democrats had leapt up to oppose the compromise because it might give legal status to illegal workers already here. The unions have a semilegitimate concern that large numbers of these workers lower wages for U.S. workers. This is probably true, but the effect is so modest that after thousands of studies, reputable economists have not been able to agree upon how much wages are reduced or even if they are at all.

Senate Democrats were also afraid that a half-baked Senate measure would be ripped apart in conference by Jim Sensenbrenner, the House negotiator who in past conferences has eaten senators for breakfast and cleaned his teeth with their bones.

What happened next is comprehensible only to devotees of the Senate. A trifling few differences about substance erupted into a furious disagreement about who would control the schedule on the floor.

As darkness settled last night, aides were boiling with frustration and ladling precriminations to me over the phone. Nobody could quite put their finger on exactly what was holding up a deal. And yet the Democrats might end up defeating a liberal immigration bill over a trifle.

"This is the sweet-spot deal," said the immigration expert Tamar Jacoby. "It makes moral sense. It makes practical sense. It's a little convoluted, but it's workable. If it fails, what a shame."

The House may be vulgar, but at least that body gets things done.

apnair2002
04-07-2006, 08:32 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/06/immigration.ap/index.html

BAD NEWS

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/12200612/

learning01
04-07-2006, 09:24 AM
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Immigration.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)
Published: April 7, 2006

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A Senate breakthrough on an immigration bill praised by leaders in both parties appeared endangered by partisan bickering over amendments from opponents.

Both sides acknowledged that if the Senate is going to pass a bill, it might not occur until Congress returns from a two-week Easter recess.

Republicans appeared united in blocking a final vote on a compromise proposal worked out among immigration leaders in the two parties until Democrats allow votes on amendments by opponents.

A test vote was scheduled Friday on the compromise, as well as a bill by Majority Leader Bill Frist.

learning01
04-07-2006, 12:06 PM
From Guardian.co.uk: (http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,,-5740554,00.html)Friday April 7, 2006 3:46 PM
AP Photo WCAP107 By SUZANNE GAMBOA Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate sidetracked sweeping immigration legislation Friday, leaving in doubt prospects for passing a bill offering the hope of citizenship to millions of men, women and children living in the United States illegally.

A carefully crafted compromise that supporters had claimed could win an overwhelming majority received only 38 of the 60 votes necessary to protect it from weakening amendments by opponents.

Republicans were united in the 38-60 parliamentary vote but Democrats, who have insisted on no amendments, lost six votes from their members.

Earlier Friday, President Bush prodded lawmakers to keeping trying to reach an agreement, but both sides said the odds were increasing that a breakthrough would not occur until Congress returns from a two-week recess.

``An immigration system that forces people into the shadows of our society, or leaves them prey to criminals is a system that needs to be changed,'' Bush said at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast. ``I'm confident that we can change our immigration system in ways that secures our border, respects the rule of law, and, as importantly, upholds the decency of our country.''

Democrats and Republicans blamed each other for the stalemate.

``It's not gone forward because there's a political advantage for Democrats not to have an immigration bill,'' said Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter, R-Pa.

He said Democrats perceive a benefit in having only a GOP-written House bill that criminalizes being an illegal immigrant. That bill has prompted massive protests across the country, including a march by 500,000 people in Los Angeles last month.

Democrats blamed Republicans for insisting on amendments that would weaken a compromise that Senate leaders in both parties had celebrated Thursday.

``This opportunity is slipping through our hands like grains of sand,'' said assistant Senate Democratic leader Dick Durbin of Illinois.

The election-year legislation is designed to enhance border security and regulate the flow of future temporary workers as well as affect the lives of illegal immigrants.

It separates illegal immigrants now in the U.S. into three categories.

Illegal immigrants here more than five years could work for six years and apply for legal permanent residency without having to leave the country. Those here two years to five years would have to go to border entry points sometime in next three years, but could immediately return as temporary workers. Those here less than two years would have to leave and wait in line for visas to return.

The bill also provides a new program for 1.5 million temporary agriculture industry workers over five years. It includes provisions requiring employers to verify they've hired legal workers and calls for a ``virtual'' fence of surveillance cameras, sensors and other technology to monitor the nearly 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexican border.

Demonstrations in support of the compromise were planned for Monday across the nation, including one in Washington that organizers claimed would draw 100,000 people.

The acrimony in the Senate at Thursday night's end was a sharp contrast to the accolades 14 members of both parties traded just hours earlier when they announced their compromise.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist called it tragic ``that we in all likelihood are not going to be able to address a problem that directly affects the American people.''

The House has passed legislation limited to border security, but Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., and other leaders have signaled their willingness in recent days to broaden the bill in compromise talks with the Senate.

But Rep. Tom Tancredo, R-Colo., said anything with what he called amnesty would not get agreement from a majority in the House.

The immigration debate has given the American public a glimpse of what may lay ahead in 2008 GOP presidential politics.

Frist, R-Tenn., a potential presidential candidate in 2008, sought to establish more conservative credentials when he initially backed a bill limited to border security. At the same time, he has repeatedly called for a comprehensive bill - adopting Bush's rhetoric - and involved himself in the fitful negotiations over the past several days.
---

On the Net:

Senate: http://senate.gov

learning01
04-07-2006, 12:16 PM
Businesses trying to keep educated immigrants
By June Kronholz Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

Last year, Stanford University awarded 88 Ph.D.s in electrical engineering, 49 of which went to foreign-born students. U.S. business would like to hang on to these kinds of prized graduates and not lose them to the world—which is one reason why it has a big stake in the immigration bill that is consuming the Senate.
The fate of millions of illegal immigrants, most of them low-skilled workers, dominates that debate. But the future of thousands of high-skilled foreign workers seeking admission to the country—scientists, mathematicians, health-care workers—may be equally important to the U.S. economy. Because of the key role many of those workers play in cutting-edge businesses, industry lobbyists are pushing measures that would more than double the number of visas available to skilled workers.
But if the years-long effort to overhaul the U.S. immigration system collapses, the issue of those visas could be buried in the rubble. "Our biggest fear is that the other issue—the undocumented workers—bogs down and threatens the entire bill," says Ralph Hellman of the Information Technology Industry Council, a Washington-based trade group.
Trying to break the Senate impasse, President Bush weighed into the fray yesterday, calling for a guest-worker plan that "provides for automatic citizenship" and urging senators to "come to a conclusion as quickly as possible" so talks can begin with the House.
Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a Tennessee Republican, invited Democrats for the first time into what had been Republican-only meetings to find some compromise that can command the 60 votes needed to close down debate.
A first attempt to invoke cloture, filed by Democrats, will likely fail today given the continued partisan tensions over the bill. But Mr. Frist appears more willing to break with the most conservative critics of the immigration bill in his party if a new middle ground can be defined.
Increasing visa limits for workers at all skill levels is certain to be part of that compromise. While business is eager for more low-skilled immigration to keep the service and construction industries humming, it's also lobbying hard for workers for cutting-edge high-tech and science-based industries.
Currently, only 65,000 three-year visas are available to skilled workers each year, and demand for those slots was so strong in the fiscal year that started in October 2005 that employers, who must sponsor those workers, snapped up all of them by last August.
The government also gives out 140,000 employment-based visas yearly—so-called green cards that put immigrants on the track to citizenship. But those visas are shared equally among all sending countries. That means that an employer hoping to hire a Chinese- or Indian-born worker now has at least a five-year wait before the immigration service even reads the application.
Employers from hospitals to high schools increasingly are reliant on foreign workers who enter the U.S. through the employment-visa line. But high-tech employers are particularly dependent, and they say that the paucity of visas threatens their competitiveness.
Dallas-based Texas Instruments Inc. says about 500 of its 19,000 domestic employees are waiting for U.S. green cards, and that most of them are electrical engineers. Those workers are in the U.S. on temporary work permits, but while their green-card applications are pending, they can't change work assignments or cities to meet their companies' needs.
Employers are particularly irked by the visa system's treatment of foreign-born scientists who must leave the country after finishing their studies if a U.S. company can't secure a visa to hire them. As it is, U.S.-born students account for only about half the science, math, technology and engineering advanced-degree holders turned out by American universities yearly.
When companies run out of U.S.-born workers, and then can't hire immigrants, "projects get dropped or delayed, so development is slowed down," says Patrick Duffy, a human-resources lawyer for Intel Corp.
"It's not as if the work won't get done, it's where will the work get done," adds Sandra Boyd, who heads a National Association of Manufacturers competitiveness initiative.
In 1999, at the height of the dot-com bubble, high-tech industries convinced Congress to triple the number of temporary visas available every year. That largely met the economy's needs, says the Information Technology council. But the measure expired in 2003, and with the high-tech industry then ailing, employers didn't push for an extension.
Two years ago, under renewed pressure from employers, Congress made a modest adjustment. It exempted 20,000 advanced-degree holders who already were studying at U.S. universities from the cap on temporary visas, allowing them to take jobs with U.S. employers. But again, demand was so strong that those slots were filled on Jan. 9 for the fiscal year beginning in October.
"It doesn't make sense to educate this talent and then send them to our global competition to compete against us," says Intel's Mr. Duffy.
Lobbyists for the technology industry say they get a sympathetic hearing on Capitol Hill with that argument. The immigration bill passed by the Senate Judiciary Committee last week increases the number of green cards to 290,000 and the number of temporary visas to 115,000.
It also exempts U.S.-educated advanced-degree holders in science, technology, engineering and math from both of those caps, and puts them on an immediate path to citizenship, if they choose to stay in the U.S. after finishing their degrees.
An immigration bill passed by the House in December focuses on enforcing immigration laws on the border and in workplaces.
But the Information Technology council's Mr. Hellman says he expects that House members who are appointed to the conference committee that reconciles the House and Senate versions of any immigration bills will support measures aimed at high-skilled workers.
If that compromise bill does more than just enhance enforcement, he says, "our \[issue\] is first in line in terms of support."
But Congress might not get that far. Republicans remain split over how many of the current 11 million illegal immigrants should be granted permanent residency. Moreover, the Senate is scheduled to start a two-week recess tomorrow, which means that immigration overhaul could die for lack of action.
If that happens, industry lobbyists say they would try to attach their visa measures to a spending bill later in the year. That risks further delay and uncertainty, though, even while competitors, including Britain, are streamlining their immigration systems to attract high-skilled workers. "We'll find ourselves playing catch-up," warns the National Association of Manufacturers' Ms. Boyd.
David Rogers contributed to this article.

Date of Publication: April 06, 2006 on Page

learning01
04-07-2006, 03:37 PM
Tough this article deals with H1B visa caps, it is an example of the how (http://itmanagement.earthweb.com//article.php/3597521)the 'other side' propagates their biased story with this 'safe sounding' title.

For my part, I wrote to the author to research and write about the issues affecting these temporary workers, whose contribution to this country and its economy is immense.

Berkeleybee
04-07-2006, 04:01 PM
Tough this article deals with H1B visa caps, it is an example of the how (http://itmanagement.earthweb.com//article.php/3597521)the 'other side' propagates their biased story with this 'safe sounding' title.

For my part, I wrote to the author to research and write about the issues affecting these temporary workers, whose contribution to this country and its economy is immense.

Note also that IEEE (see last paragraph) is not opposed to permanent residency for high skilled workers -- it is the temporariness that they object to.

virtual55
04-07-2006, 05:41 PM
Hagel-Martinez "Compromise" Held Back for Now
CLICK HERE TO SEE ALL SENATE ACTION. (April 7) Thanks in part to the outstanding efforts of NumbersUSA members, the Senate today voted to temporarily defeat the "compromise" plan brokered by Senators Chuck Hagel (R-NE) and Mel Martinez (R-FL). Democratic leadership refused to allow even three amendments to improve the bill by Senators opposed to the Hagel-Martinez amnesty. A cloture motion on the Hagel-Martinez amendment failed by a 38-60 vote so it cannot move forward for now. Also, a cloture motion on Sen. Bill Frist’s (R-TN) underlying bill, S. 2454, was defeated 36-62. That means the Senate has stepped back from its attempt to pass the bill this week. While the Hagel-Martinez amnesty may be defeated temporarily today, work must continue over the Easter recess to defeat it or any other form of amnesty. The Hagel-Martinez "compromise," in the words of Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) last night, gives us 95 percent of the bad elements of the Senate Judiciary Committee-passed bill that had been defeated earlier on Thursday. Please check out the NumbersUSA Vote Day Action Page for continuous updates throughout the day.

jkays94
04-07-2006, 08:05 PM
http://www.immigration-law.com/Canada.html


04/07/2006: Aftermath of Senate Defeat

Reports indicate that when the Congress return from the Easter break for two weeks, the House and the Senate Republicans intend to form a Senate-House joint committee to work out the immigration legislation. However, considering the fact that both Houses are dominated by the Republicans and the House maintains much hostile attitude against the illegal aliens, it is generally predicted that the relief for illegal aliens under the Senate bill may have a slim chance to survive.

The Senate's failure to pass "comprehensive immigration reform" legislation focusing on illegal immigration may bring about some unexpected gains for some segments in the immigrant community whose interests were represented in separate independent bills until they were brought into the packet bill named comprehensive immigration reform bill. The following list just reflects a fraction of such legislative bills:

DREAM Act (A bi-partisan members of the House have already introduced in the House, which is known to be identical to the Senate DREAM Act bill.)

H-1B Cap Adjustment (House has already been debating this legislation)

PACE Act (It is a part of Education bill rather than immigration bill and this bill is likely to continue the process)

Some other legal immigration legislation similar to the S.1932.

Today's defeat in the Senate will not stop the clock for the supporters of the illegal aliens and during the next two weeks, they may regroup and mobilize massive campaigns to keep the current momentum alive. For the news, please
click here (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-040706immig_lat%2C0%2C685577.story?coll=la-home-headlines)

jkays94
04-07-2006, 08:25 PM
Fact check on legal immigration in the United States. (http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/education/2006/03/29/factcheck.legal.immigration.cnn)

jkays94
04-07-2006, 08:32 PM
http://www.ilw.com/articles/2006,0410-barry.shtm

While FAIR constantly makes the case that illegal immigrants undermine U.S. standards, its bottom-line position is that immigrants—legal and illegal—are undermining the cultural integrity and definition of the United States . FAIR's media director Ira Mehlman paints an alarmist picture of a disintegrating society resulting from immigrant infiltration. “If the social bonds that hold the nation together are shattered,” he warns, “we will become slaves to destiny instead of masters of it.” Immigration restrictionism, he argues, is fundamental to how “we choose to define ourselves as a nation [which] must be something more than an amalgamation of workers, consumers, or even taxpayers, who happen to occupy a defined geographic area.”

kannan
04-07-2006, 10:34 PM
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1181547,00.html?cnn=yes

posmd
04-07-2006, 11:37 PM
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1181547,00.html?cnn=yes


This is very insightful and revealing article. I reccomend it highly.

Time for the big B to step up to the plate.

We need a bill, any bill, so frustrating when it is likely ANY bill will likely have favourable provisions for us.

Lets pray for the events of the next 2 weeks will blow the winds in our directions.

learning01
04-08-2006, 09:52 AM
How immigrants might actually boost wages
Influx of foreign workers leads to increased investment, study finds
By Martin Wolk (MARTINWOLK@FEEDBACK.MSNBC.COM) Chief economics correspondent MSNBC Updated: 5:42 p.m. ET April 7, 2006

In the debate raging on Capitol Hill over how to reform the nation’s immigration laws, one assumption never far from the surface is that foreign-born workers are taking jobs from native-born Americans and driving down wages.

Many economists agree that undocumented aliens reduce wages for the least skilled native-born workers, but most also say immigration benefits the economy overall by lowering prices for consumers in a sort of Wal-Mart effect. One intriguing study even suggests that the huge influx of immigrants since 1980 has boosted the average wage of U.S.-born workers by about 2 percent, partly by spurring additional capital investment.

Read it here in full at msnbc.com: (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12208037/)

virtual55
04-08-2006, 11:31 AM
http://www.andhraherald.com/index/news/comments/immigration_immigrationvoice_which_fights_for_nris _for_their_gcs/

jkays94
04-08-2006, 01:32 PM
Matthew Oh

Number One Enemy After Shockwave: Anti-Immigrationist vs. Pessimism (http://www.immigration-law.com/Canada.html)

The immigrant community and ,for that matter, the nation are still struggling to wake up from yesterday's shockwave. The immigrants and the nation are in a state of impotancy and stupor. Such vaccuum in the mental state is creeped by pessimism and depression. At this juncture, it is not the anti-immigrationists and the conversavatives but the pessimistic mental process that the immigrants and the nation are going through. Thus such shockwave as the one the nation experienced and witnessed yesterday requires added struggle and fight to overcome the huddles of anti-immigrationists and conservatives. We are all infected by the mild state of depression. It is difficult but not impossible to fight against this disease.

The comprehensive immigration reform is reportedly not completely over. There will be another cycle of political process from now until May 4 when the Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Specter will come up with the revised bill. During the period, there will also be an activity to work out a Senate-House Joint Committee. Bill Frist will play a key role as he has yet to agree that the new Specter bill (May 4) will be put on the Senate floor.

Without doubt, there is nothing to be juvilent about at this point, and the immigrants and the nation should not keep their chins down. Everyone agrees that the thing which happened yesterday was "terribly" wrong. This appears to be the general opinion of the nation. When there is a wrong, the wrong must be corrected. We cannot afford an evil to swallow the nation. Keep your chins up!

jkays94
04-08-2006, 04:49 PM
CNN's Lou Dobbs is all bully and bluster (http://www.statesmanjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060408/OPINION/60407011&SearchID=73240946563288)

Tim Rutten

April 8, 2006

It has been a while since a major American news organization treated an important national issue as irresponsibly as CNN now does immigration.

Ever since Fox News took over the top spot in the cable news ratings, CNN has thrashed from one failed strategy to another. At the moment, the network’s reporters and anchors bleed all over every story they touch.

Does anybody really care how they feel about doing their jobs? Apparently not, if the ratings are to be believed. The most recent numbers show that even the hapless MSNBC’s Keith Olbermann has eclipsed CNN in his time slot among the most desired viewer demographic

<more> (http://www.statesmanjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060408/OPINION/60407011&SearchID=73240946563288)

jkays94
04-08-2006, 05:07 PM
White House Issues Fact Sheet on Immigration Reform (http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2006&m=April&x=20060408123234attocnich0.3928644&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html)

Policy is to secure border, enforce laws, provide guest worker program

President Bush cited three key elements of his administration's policy toward comprehensive immigration reform in a fact sheet released by the White House on April 8. They are secure borders, stronger law enforcement, and a temporary guest worker program that rejects amnesty while allowing foreign workers to fill jobs no American is willing to do.

<more> (http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2006&m=April&x=20060408123234attocnich0.3928644&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html)

-- America's Immigrant Heritage Continues To Shape Our Society. Our Nation is bound together by liberty and a conviction that all people are created with equal dignity and value. Through the generations, Americans have upheld that vision by welcoming new citizens from across the globe. Immigrants have helped shape our identity and sustain our economy.

-- The President Strongly Believes America Is Stronger And More Dynamic When New Citizens Are Welcomed. The President has called on Congress to increase the number of green cards that can lead to citizenship. He supports increasing the number of visas available for foreign-born workers in highly skilled fields.

-- The President signed legislation creating a new Office of Citizenship at the Department of Homeland Security to promote knowledge of citizenship rights and procedures; the Office of Citizenship created a new official guide for immigrants, and the Administration is working with faith-based and community groups to offer civics and English-language courses. In July 2002, the President signed an Executive Order making foreign-born members of our military immediately eligible for citizenship. Over the past four years, more than 20,000 men and women in uniform have become citizens.

-- Every New Citizen Makes A Lifelong Pledge To Support The Values And Laws Of America. New citizens have an obligation to learn the customs and values that define our Nation - including liberty and civic responsibility, equality under God, tolerance for others, and the English language.

<more> (http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2006&m=April&x=20060408123234attocnich0.3928644&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html)

nk2006
04-08-2006, 07:10 PM
NPR is one independed news orgnaization that many respect. In the following the author doubts if anything is possible this year. An interesting reading and also reminds us how hard we have to fight to get anything done soon. Friends...get ready for a really hard fight.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5331729

Appu
04-08-2006, 07:21 PM
Ah! I love politics like I love cancer.

http://blogs.suntimes.com/sweet/2006/04/reid_pushes_back_bush_blames_d.html

Reid pushes back: Bush blames Democrats ``to distract from his own troubles.''

This pushback statement from the Reid camp was sent out after President Bush personally blamed Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nv.) for the failure of the Senate to pass a comprehensive immigration bill.

Washington, DC—With President Bush seeking to blame Democrats for his own failures in Congress, Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid today released the following statement on comprehensive immigration reform, which was blocked twice last week by Senate Republicans.

“In a week when President Bush was unable to convince House Republicans to pass his budget, was unable to convince Senate Republicans to pass immigration reform, and was caught misleading the American people about national security matters yet again, it's no surprise that he would take a page from the Karl Rove playbook and blame Democrats to distract from his own troubles. The fact is, President Bush and Senator Frist are flat out wrong about what happened to the immigration bill. Democrats are committed to comprehensive, bipartisan immigration reform. That's why we voted twice last week in favor of it. It was President Bush and Republicans in Congress who lacked the backbone to stand up to the extreme right-wing of their party, filibustered reform twice in two days, and put partisan politics ahead of border security and immigration reform.”

RLNY122004
04-08-2006, 11:38 PM
America's problem isn't immigration - it's education


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2006/04/09/do0902.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2006/04/09/ixopinion.html

thebullspeaks
04-09-2006, 01:27 PM
http://www.kotv.com/main/home/storiesNL.asp?whichpage=2&id=102086


WASHINGTON (AP) _ Despite the collapse of a bipartisan deal on immigration legislation, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee expressed optimism on Sunday that senators can pass a bill when they return from vacation.

``I think tempers will cool over a two-week period. And also, there are going to be some expressions by many people very unhappy with the Senate not passing a bill and very unhappy with the House bill'' that would make being an illegal immigrant a felony, said Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa.

``And there's a real risk of significant political fallout here, and members of the Senate think about that, believe it or not,'' he said.

Specter pledged to have legislation ready for debate soon after lawmakers return from their two-week recess.

A bill hailed as a bipartisan breakthrough in an election year fell victim late last week to internal disputes in both parties as well as political maneuvering.

On the key vote, only 38 senators, all Democrats, lined up in support. That was 22 short of the 60 needed, and left the legislation in limbo.

President Bush, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee and other Republican leaders blamed Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the Democratic leader, of ``putting a stranglehold'' on the Senate by refusing to permit votes on more than three Republican amendments.

The bill would have provided for stronger border security, regulated the future entry of foreign workers and created a complex set of regulations for the estimated 11 million immigrants illegally in the United States.

``I think when we come back from recess, we'll get a bill,'' Specter told ``Fox News Sunday.''

Frist has stopped short of a commitment to bring another immigration bill to the floor by year's end, noting that it would depend on the schedule, already crowded with other legislation.

But Specter said Sunday, ``Everyone agrees there's an enormous problem. There's general agreement that we have to craft a compromise.''


Created: 4/9/2006
Updated: 4/9/2006 10:57:47 AM

learning01
04-09-2006, 01:39 PM
By WILL LESTER, Associated Press Writer (http://www.fortmilltimes.com/24hour/nation/story/3254968p-12029379c.html)(Published April 9, 2006)

WASHINGTON (AP) - People are now about as likely to mention immigration as the economy when they are asked to name the most important problem facing the United States, though both rank behind war in Iraq and elsewhere, an AP-Ipsos poll found.
Immigration's rise in the latest survey about the nation's top problems suggests the public is keeping close watch on the immigration debate in Congress and reaction around the country.
........

Efforts in the Senate to pass sweeping immigration legislation faltered Friday, leaving in doubt the prospects for passage of a measure that offered the hope of citizenship to millions of men, women and children living in the United States illegally.

The rise in public concern about immigration over the last three months has been substantial.
When people were asked this past week to name the top national problem that came to mind, 13 percent said immigration - four times the number who said that in January. Roughly the same number, 14 percent of those polled, named the economy, according to the poll of 500 adults conducted April 3-5. The survey has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.

Read it at the link provided above.

posmd
04-09-2006, 02:32 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/08/Bush.radio.ap/index.html


Encouraging to see that. I am not sure if this is politics to deflect blame or keeping it in the limelight until after the recess. Anyway the fact that he is speaking of it, that polls continue to come out and that street protests continue to be covered will hopefully keep the heat up! I hope we get some bill now, since general consensus here is that any bill will get our provisions through.

jkays94
04-09-2006, 05:14 PM
BREAKING NEWS: 250,000 Protest Immigration Reform In Dallas (http://www.nbc5i.com/news/8575955/detail.html)

DALLAS -- Hundreds of thousands of people are crowding the streets of downtown Dallas to protest immigration reform at City Hall.

Organizers expect more than 50,000 people to march through the city to ask for immigration laws that include legalizing millions of undocumented workers.

However, officials Sunday afternoon said at least 250,000 people are in attendance.

learning01
04-09-2006, 08:42 PM
However, Dallas police said from 350,000 to as many as a half-million people took part in the event.
BREAKING NEWS: 250,000 Protest Immigration Reform In Dallas (http://www.nbc5i.com/news/8575955/detail.html)

DALLAS -- Hundreds of thousands of people are crowding the streets of downtown Dallas to protest immigration reform at City Hall.

Organizers expect more than 50,000 people to march through the city to ask for immigration laws that include legalizing millions of undocumented workers.

However, officials Sunday afternoon said at least 250,000 people are in attendance.

vgayalu
04-09-2006, 09:18 PM
Guys,
IV volunteers are doing great job. Too many news in forums are confusing. Is there any chance to summarise by any expert please? If so please publish on home page of IV.

Vgayalu.

learning01
04-09-2006, 09:45 PM
Specter 'optimistic' as protests highlight political ramifications (http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/09/immigration/)

Sunday, April 9, 2006; Posted: 8:12 p.m. EDT (00:12 GMT)
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Lawmakers traded blame Sunday over the impasse that left immigration legislation stalled last week in the Senate, expressing hope that the push for an election-year overhaul was not dead.
"I hope it's savable," said Sen. John Kerry, a Massachusetts Democrat. "I hope politics doesn't get in the way."

Sen. Arlen Specter, the Republican chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he is "optimistic," but quickly added "I'm always optimistic."

"There's a real risk of significant political fallout here," he told "Fox News Sunday."

apnair2002
04-10-2006, 02:15 AM
Specter 'optimistic' as protests highlight political ramifications (http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/09/immigration/)

Sunday, April 9, 2006; Posted: 8:12 p.m. EDT (00:12 GMT)
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Lawmakers traded blame Sunday over the impasse that left immigration legislation stalled last week in the Senate, expressing hope that the push for an election-year overhaul was not dead.
"I hope it's savable," said Sen. John Kerry, a Massachusetts Democrat. "I hope politics doesn't get in the way."

Sen. Arlen Specter, the Republican chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he is "optimistic," but quickly added "I'm always optimistic."

"There's a real risk of significant political fallout here," he told "Fox News Sunday."

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060410/ap_on_re_us/immigration_protests

bkam
04-10-2006, 11:59 AM
Dear All,

Obviously "someone" organizes the "illegals" quite well and Latin America is trying to conquer the North America... But it seems to me that the bullying tactics of the illegals annoys the average Americans and may give negative results. Therefore I think we have to clearly distinguish ourselves from the illegals, as well as our means for achieving our goals (no bullying, no rough pushing).

It is time now for the IV to start contacting all kind of media (whereever it works, of course) and to explain who the legals are and what is their contribution to the society.

luckylavs
04-10-2006, 12:25 PM
Time to fight for the legals who are struggling for GC.

My suggesstion is too mention what progress is being done for the legals who are waiting to hear updates on latest updates for GC/ retrogation.

My Guess is majority of members in this thread are legals ... lets not get confussed when there is demonstrations / protests by illegals.

jkandra
04-10-2006, 12:30 PM
A good op/ed article about legal immigrants.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/10/opinion/10Clemons.html

Pineapple
04-10-2006, 01:52 PM
A good op/ed article about legal immigrants.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/10/opinion/10Clemons.html

Excellent article!

Pineapple
04-10-2006, 01:56 PM
Here is the full article:

Op-Ed Contributors
How to Lose the Brain Race
Sign In to E-Mail This Print Save By STEVEN CLEMONS and MICHAEL LIND
Published: April 10, 2006
Washington

IS the United States importing too many immigrant physicists and not enough immigrant farm workers? You might think so, to judge from two provisions that Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, added to the comprehensive immigration reform package that just fell apart in the Senate. Senator Feinstein insisted that the bill call for some fees for foreign students applying to study at American colleges and universities to be doubled, and also demanded that agribusiness get the right to 1.5 million low-wage foreign guest workers over five years. Combined, the two proposals sent a message to the rest of the world: send us your brawn, not your brains.

Whether Senator Feinstein's amendments will resurface in any reconstituted legislation on immigration reform remains unclear. But her priorities reflect in many ways those of Congress as a whole. Congress seems to believe that while the United States must be protected from an invasion of educated, bright and ambitious foreign college students, scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs, we can never have too many low-wage fruit-pickers and dishwashers.

In making immigration laws, Congress caters to cheap-labor industries like agribusiness and sweatshop manufacturing while shortchanging the high-tech, high-wage industries on which the future of the American economy depends. Witness the Senate bill's provision to admit 400,000 temporary workers a year, or roughly four million a decade, in addition to the 12 million mostly low-wage illegal immigrants already here, many of whose status would be legalized. Few if any of those guest workers would go to universities, corporate campuses or innovation clusters like Silicon Valley. They would head straight to restaurants, hotels and plantation-like farms.

While the United States perversely tries to corner the market in uneducated hotel maids and tomato harvesters, other industrial democracies are reshaping their immigration policies to invite the skilled immigrants that we turn away. Britain is following Australia and Canada in adopting a points system that gives higher scores to skilled immigrants with advanced education and proficiency in English. British, Canadian, German and even French universities are overflowing in undergraduate and graduate enrollment as they absorb the foreign talent that America is repelling.

Whereas Senator Feinstein fears that foreigners are snatching places at American universities from deserving American students, the fact is that our universities are weakened when fewer talented international students enter their programs.

In recent years, skilled immigration to the United States has been accommodated chiefly by the H-1B visa program. But like all guest-worker programs, the H-1B program pits American workers against foreign workers lacking full legal and political rights. Because H-1B workers depend on employer sponsorship to remain in this country, unscrupulous employers can blackmail them into working longer hours for lower pay than American workers. Skilled workers admitted under a points system, by contrast, would be able to quit their employers in the United States and find new ones at will without risk of deportation.

Will admitting more immigrants drive down the wages of American workers? That may be true in unskilled jobs, since there is a fixed number of bedpans to be emptied and restaurant meals to be cooked in the United States.

But it isn't necessarily true for skilled workers, at least not in the long run. That's because more talent means more innovation and opportunities for all, immigrant and native alike. The growth economist Paul Romer has spoken of the prospector theory of human capital. The more prospectors there are, the more likely it is that some will find gold. As the history of Silicon Valley and other tech centers proves, brain work migrates to where the brain workers are. It's a kind of Field of Dreams in reverse: You will build it, if they come.

Even if a skill-based immigration system did reduce incomes for the elite, that would not be the end of the world. For a generation, college-educated Americans have enjoyed a seller's market in professional services and a buyer's market in the labor of landscapers and nannies. If skilled immigration were increased while unskilled immigration were reduced, the wages of janitors would go up while the salaries and fees of professionals would fall, creating a broader middle class and a more equal society.

The United States can always use another Albert Einstein or Alexander Graham Bell. But with the vast pool of poorly paid, ill-educated laborers already within our borders, we do not need a third of a million new ones a year.

What the space race was to the cold war, the "brain race" is to today's peaceful global economic competition. The comprehensive immigration reform America needs is one that slashes unskilled immigration and creates a skill-rewarding points system modeled on those of Australia, Britain and Canada. In encouraging skilled labor, Congress for a change might perform some of its own.

Steven Clemons is the director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation. Michael Lind is a senior fellow there.

jkays94
04-10-2006, 02:01 PM
Time to fight for the legals who are struggling for GC.

My suggesstion is too mention what progress is being done for the legals who are waiting to hear updates on latest updates for GC/ retrogation.

My Guess is majority of members in this thread are legals ... lets not get confussed when there is demonstrations / protests by illegals.

Correct to some extent, I'll just point out that there were very significant numbers of bonafide US citizens and legal immigrants involved in the protests something that was evident in the marches in Dallas yesterday when the organizers asked those in the crowd by a show of flags to indicate how many were registered or soon to be registered voters. I believe these news items are relevant, majority of the US public doesn't distinguish between legal and illegal immigration and it is futile for legal immigrants to bash illegal or undocumented immigrants. Just last Friday Lou Dobbs launched an attack against H1-Bs as people (aka temporary workers) who come to the US to take American jobs, visit a number of blogs and you will see the same repeated claims propagated all over. The reality is that legal immigrants will indeed be affected by the same policies that stand to be imposed on the undocumented. The fact that there is no separate bill for "legals only" underscores this, not only that anyone who watched the senate debate knows only 1 or 2 senators spoke about EB issues on the floor.

On the statement that it is "someone" its not just anyone, but a broad based coalition of businesses, religious groups, civil rights and community organizations (click here to see who funds just one of these orgs (http://www.communitychange.org/press/funders/)) that already support some of the bills which legal immigrants stand to benefit from, such as the Talent, Pace and Dream acts, bills through which ammendments favoring legal immigrants could benefit from. For this reason, "them vs us" is not going to get us anywhere. Its not a battle one can hope to win. The best one can do is attempt to highlight the plight of legal immigrants and in this case it is not easy, as is evident from the recent article that mentioned IV, H1-Bs were called temporary workers for example.

This new article below only shows the muddied waters that we find ourselves in. Even as the writer tries to make some distinctions, again there is a very weak case made for EB immigrants and some inaccuracies as to the GC process. But he does state correctly that employment based immigration in the US is a low priority.

Immigration misunderstood (http://washingtontimes.com/commentary/20060408-104000-9049r.htm)

I have often written about immigration and never failed to be misunderstood. Even the simplest statements of fact invite angry blogs and e-mails from people who claim to believe the only thing that matters is physically stopping those who arrive by crossing one of our borders on foot. Actually, most illegal immigrants arrive legally by car or plane, sometimes as tourists or students, or as alien crewmen who jump ship, or as travelers ostensibly in transit. [...]

nlssubbu
04-10-2006, 04:40 PM
Hi,

The following article has a well balanced view of immigration

http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=1820812&page=1

Thanks

jkays94
04-10-2006, 05:44 PM
http://voanews.com/english/2006-04-10-voa27.cfm

President Bush has welcomed Monday's protests over immigration reforms. He says it is a sign that people feel strongly about the issue.

Mr. Bush told an audience of students in Washington that protests are a key way for people in a free society to express themselves.

He also called for compassion in the debate over proposed immigration reforms. He said people need to understand the United States is a nation of immigrants.

bkarnik
04-10-2006, 06:45 PM
UPDATE: Immigration Rallies Making Impact On Workplace
967 words
10 April 2006
06:36 pm GMT
Dow Jones News Service
English
(c) 2006 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.


(Updates with comment from builder and chain restaurants beginning in sixth paragraph.)

By Richard Gibson
Of DOW JONES NEWSWIRES


DES MOINES, Iowa (Dow Jones)--Amid calls for a nationwide work stoppage and economic boycott, throngs of immigration-reform advocates rallied across the U.S. again Monday.

Several meatpacking plants either temporarily shut down or operated on a reduced schedule because of a lack of production-line workers, many of whom are immigrants.

Industry giant Tyson Foods Inc. (TSN) said some of its facilities, including a plant in Madison, Neb., will be closed, partly because of the planned rallies and partly because of poor livestock market conditions.

Futures traders and other meat-industry sources reported that at least two Swift & Co. beef plants were operating at reduced speeds Monday, apparently because of employee shortages. Also, a large Smithfield Foods Inc. (SFD) pork plant in North Carolina wasn't operating, industry sources said. Company officials said they don't comment on daily plant operations unless developments are material.

Other industries that depend heavily on immigrant labor and thus potentially hard-hit by an organized work stoppage include restaurants, construction, hotels, and building cleaning and maintenance. Additional areas such residential maid service, gardening and miscellaneous day-labor situations also could be affected.

Brian Jo, a siding and drywall contractor in Charlotte, said he was baffled when half his crew of 12 Hispanic workers didn't show up for work Monday. It was unclear if their absence was related to a local rally. "They didn't say anything, but they don't answer the phone," he said.

One restaurant industry analyst, Bryan Elliott at Raymond James & Associates, told his clients Monday that "widespread job actions could put severe strain on operations at many restaurants, leading to weak sales, speed-of-service issues and much higher costs on overtime and other replacement labor cost pressures. Customer goodwill could also be materially impacted," he said.

But spokesmen for Darden Restaurants Inc. (DRI) and Wendy's International Inc. (WEN) said they had experienced no operational disruptions, partly because of planning.

"Our managers approached restaurant teams in advance of rallies to remind them what's proper procedure to take a day off," said Jim DiSimone of Darden, which operates the Olive Garden, Red Lobster, Smokey Bones and Bahama Breeze chains.

He said that in some cases, work schedules were adjusted so employees could attend rallies. "We've communicated that it's unacceptable just not to show up to work, so we haven't had incidents of being understaffed," DiSimone said.

Wendy's spokesman Bob Bertini said that "through proper communications, planning and scheduling, we have been able to accommodate restaurant employees who have asked for time away from work. We respect our Hispanic employees and understand their desire to support an effort that's important to them," he said.

Throngs of demonstrators, many wearing white T-shirts and waving American flags, marched Monday through an immigrant neighborhood in Atlanta as part of what was billed as a "National Day of Action for Immigrant Justice." Similar outpourings were expected in dozens of cities across the country.

On Sunday, what was called the "Not a Penny" boycott of businesses in Dallas caused many establishments to close for the day. The city's symphony orchestra canceled its afternoon performance as hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in the arts district, snarling traffic through the area.

The full brunt of immigrants' economic power could be felt May 1. That's when some advocate groups are calling for a national "Day Without an Immigrant" that could involve millions of workers taking the day off to show solidarity behind the reform movement.

Employers hit by worker absenteeism may have little legal recourse.

"When employees get together for mutual aid and comfort, they are protected from discriminatory action by employers, regardless of whether they are unionized or not," said Sherrie Travis, an attorney specialist in employment and labor law at the Chicago law firm of Wildman Harrold Allen & Dixon.

Because the protests relate to the workplace, she believes demonstrators would come under such shields as the National Labor Relations Act. Similarly, discrimination on the basis of national origin and citizenship status also is protected, Travis said.

"We are advising our clients to be extremely conservative and think carefully before doing anything," Travis said. "Employers with large immigrant work forces are benefitting from the facts of the situation as it is, so I don't know if they want to take a hard-line approach," she said.

Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson said the company supports "comprehensive immigration reform and support our team members' right to express themselves on this important matter.

"We're telling them if they plan to take part in a rally Monday and their plant is scheduled to operate, we hope they will not take any unauthorized time off but will instead get pre-approval from their supervisor or participate during non-work hours," he said. "We're also encouraging them to consider expressing their views by writing or calling their U.S. senators or representative."

A schedule of dozens of demonstrations across the country Monday showed that many would be held in the late afternoon or early evening, apparently so as not to disrupt workplaces. One such example: Washington, D.C.

But organizers in other cities, among them Atlanta and Charlotte, scheduled their demonstrations throughout the day or during morning hours.

The latest wave of demonstration comes as Congress is on an Easter break after politics in the Senate derailed a compromise proposal. Legislation that immigration reform advocates consider harsher has been passed by the House but is awaiting Senate action.

-By Richard Gibson, Dow Jones Newswires; 515-282-6830; dick.gibson@dowjones.com [ 04-10-06 1436ET ]

FinalGC
04-10-2006, 07:32 PM
Guys:

For your information!!!!

I just called a reporter at Detroit Free Press and have requested him to write an article on LEGAL IMMIGRATION and support the 2 new bills. I have pointed him to our website for more information. He may possibly talk to some of you. His name is Niraj Warikoo. If so, please do give him as much information as possible.

If many of you could contact your local newspapers and ask them to publish an article on our CASE, then it will automatically reach the Senators of that State.

My 2cents.

Regards,

learning01
04-10-2006, 07:42 PM
Opinion (http://desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060410/OPINION01/604100310/1035/OPINION)
LORI CHESSER SPECIAL TO THE REGISTER April 10, 2006

Immigration reform should do three things: Further the fundamental goals of the United States, recognize the laws of economics and respect human rights.

First, enabling more people to immigrate is in our national interest because new Americans mean a better, stronger America. Immigrants' qualities of courage, energy, creativity, ambition, religious faith and family cohesiveness built America. Increasing the number of immigrant and temporary visas is not something to fear.

Moreover, our most successful diplomacy is letting people see America first-hand. We should continue to welcome refugees and encourage foreign students and exchange visitors.

Second, to have control over immigration, our laws must be consistent with economic reality. To find out why workers are coming here without permission, we must look both across the border and in the mirror. Immigrants and their employers break immigration laws in most cases because they have to comply with an even more inflexible law: supply and demand.

We are now at statistical full employment, and the baby boomers are retiring. If we want to keep jobs here, we must substantially increase legal employment-based immigration both for those who do and those who create jobs. We also must have temporary work visas at all skills levels for quick response to market needs. Finally, we must examine the incentives created both here and abroad by other laws such as taxes, tariffs and trade agreements.

Third, our law must respect both human rights and the rule of law. We cannot abandon due process, right to counsel and punishment that fits the crime when enforcing immigration laws. Once our laws become respectable, they will be respected - and can then be enforced to promote security.

We must devise a way for families to be united more quickly through either more family-based immigrant visas or a way for family members to visit relatives while waiting in line. We must give unauthorized workers a path of hope that may penalize but not criminalize them on the way to legalization. Any other response will only create an "underclass" and solidify low wages and poor working conditions.

American citizenship is prized, and rightly so. But hoarding it will not increase its value. Historically, our immigration laws have changed based on how we view the world and ourselves. Today, we should not fear losing America, but have confidence that we will find it where we always have - in the faces of immigrants.
LORI CHESSER is chair of the American Immigration Lawyers Reform Committee, Des Moines.

jkays94
04-10-2006, 09:00 PM
CSPAN call in numbers for comments on US Immigration Policy (8pm EST)

202-585-3885 Eastern/Central Time Zone
202-585-3886 Mountain/Pacific Time Zone

bidhanc
04-11-2006, 03:56 PM
Hi,

This article is regarding the shortening of Citizenship by Senator Lamar Alexander.
Could he possibly be someone we could approach for our ammendments/interests?

http://www.workpermit.com/news/2006/us/us_senate_shortens_citizenship_wait.htm

dpsg
04-11-2006, 04:17 PM
http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/14289668.htm

Providing green cards to qualified candidates can help US retain its technology edge in future.Technology
organizations like IEEE also supports permanent immigration and are opposed to H1-B program.

I am sure many people will doubt IEEE intentions, But they have some substance to their analysis.

eb3retro
04-11-2006, 04:54 PM
http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/14289668.htm

Providing green cards to qualified candidates can help US retain its technology edge in future.Technology
organizations like IEEE also supports permanent immigration and are opposed to H1-B program.

I am sure many people will doubt IEEE intentions, But they have some substance to their analysis.


can we send this document to California Senator Dianne Feinstin??? :D

learning01
04-11-2006, 06:00 PM
April 11 (Bloomberg) -- The fate of an overhaul of U.S. immigration law rests on whether President George W. Bush is willing to spend political capital and the Democrats are willing to let him get political credit for doing so.

``The president, who seems to like to talk a lot about this but not say very much, needs to get specific,'' said Angela Kelley, deputy director of the Washington-based National Immigration Forum, a pro-immigration group. ``Democrats are united on the substance,'' she said, and ``a little divided on the politics.''
....
`Up to Frist'

Then it will fall to Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a Tennessee Republican, to decide when the Senate will again take up legislation. ``That's all up to Frist and I think that depends on what the White House tells him,'' Kelley said. ``If the president is giving him lukewarm signals, I don't think he's going to do it.''
.......
A separate new ABC News/Washington Post survey conducted April 6-9 found that about sixty percent of Americans support allowing illegal immigrants who already live in the U.S. to obtain legal status and eventual citizenship.

Read it in full at bloomberg.com (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aWOTzBZb0cVI&refer=us)

learning01
04-11-2006, 07:12 PM
washingtonpost.com's Daily Politics Discussion (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2006/04/06/DI2006040601640.html)
Charles Babington, Washington Post Congressional Reporter
Tuesday, April 11, 2006; 11:00 AM
Delray Beach, Fla.: Is there any indication that the White House is attempting to influence the more conservative Senators and Representatives to take a more moderate stance on immigration? To avoid the backlash experienced in Calif. during Gov. Wilson's tenure.

Charles Babington: Many congressional Republicans are urging the President to involve himself more forcefully in the immigration debate. One school of thought -- and I don't know if it's accurate -- is that the White House did not want to play a heavy hand in the Senate debate because it wants to save its energy and capital for the big battle that will ensue if the House and Senate try to reconcile their bills. (but of course, the Senate first must PASS a bill). As you may recall, the House-passed bill is enforcement-only, and does not deal with guest-worker programs or paths to legal status for illegal immigrants.
Link

Berkeleybee
04-11-2006, 08:13 PM
His press release from Apr 11, 2006
http://immigrationvoice.org/forum/showpost.php?p=8427&postcount=69

Berkeleybee
04-12-2006, 12:35 AM
All,

In a remarkable round of jostling Republican's are trying to pin the House (Sensenbrenner) bill on the Democrats! They are backing away from that bill and the hard core provisions it contains! This can only mean that CIR is alive.

Read on:

http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/11/immigration/

Immigration bill may lose felony provision
GOP leaders say they don't support legislation's tough language

Tuesday, April 11, 2006; Posted: 11:25 p.m. EDT (03:25 GMT)

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The top Republicans in both the House and Senate indicated Tuesday they don't support language in an immigration bill that would make entering the country illegally a felony.

The proposal has drawn the ire of pro-immigrant groups that have staged a wave of protests in recent weeks.

The provision making illegal immigration a felony was contained in an immigration reform bill passed by the House in December. But in a joint statement issued Tuesday evening, House Speaker Dennis Hastert of Illinois and Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee both indicated they wanted the language dropped.

Frist and Hastert also criticized House Democrats, who, they said, opposed efforts by Republicans to strip the provision from the bill before it passed.

"Instead, they voted to make felons out of all of those who remain in our country illegally," their statement said.

Frist and Hastert did not specify whether they wanted unlawful presence in the United States to be a misdemeanor or carry a lesser penalty.

Their statement was also silent on the question of whether they had come to any agreement on two issues that have split Republicans -- creating a guest-worker program, or allowing undocumented immigrants in the country illegally to work their way toward legal status.

The provision making illegal immigration a felony was part of a bill pushed by House Judiciary Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner, a Wisconsin Republican. It passed the House in December by a vote of 239-182, with only 36 Democrats supporting the final version of the measure.

Responding to Tuesday's criticism of Democrats by Hastert and Frist, Jennifer Crider, a spokeswoman for House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, said "no amount of spin can change the fact that Republicans wrote and passed the Sensenbrenner bill, which criminalizes an entire population."

Crider also said Republicans "are feeling the heat" after demonstrations that brought out hundreds of thousands of protesters Monday at rallies in at least 140 cities in more than 39 states. (Full story)

Sensenbrenner, who sponsored the provision making illegal immigration a felony, said last week that he tried to remove it from the bill in December and remains open to making the change as the House and Senate try to reach an agreement on a final bill.

Republican Rep. Tom Tancredo of Colorado, a leading advocate of cracking down on illegal immigration, has accused Democrats of trying to keep the felony provision in the bill as a "poison pill."

But Sen. Edward Kennedy on Tuesday dismissed such characterizations.

"Actions speak louder than words, and there's no running away from the fact that the Republican House passed a bill and Senator Frist offered one that criminalizes immigrants," the Massachusetts Democrat said.

"This debate shouldn't be about making criminals out of hard-working families ... but rather about strengthening our national security and enacting a law that reflects our best values and our humanity," he said in a written statement.

Sensenbrenner's bill also calls for building 700 miles of security fence along the Mexican border and would also make assisting illegal immigrants a felony.

It does not include a guest-worker provision, as President Bush has called for, or a legalization process for people already in the United States illegally. Critics dismiss that idea as "amnesty," while supporters call it "earned citizenship."

House GOP aides said Tuesday that language aimed at punishing people who help illegal immigrants was aimed at smugglers who bring people across the border, not at charities who assist the migrants.

As protests against the House bill mounted in late March, the White House and the Republican National Committee raised concerns that the anti-immigration sentiment coming from some corners of the GOP would turn off Latino voters that Bush and his political team have worked hard to court.

But Republican leaders must also contend with a growing chorus within their conservative base to crack down on illegal immigration.

Senate attempts to pass an immigration reform bill stalled last week when a measure establishing a guest-worker program and a mechanism for legalization failed to overcome opposition from conservative Republicans.

logiclife
04-12-2006, 03:18 AM
Well,

When you are out on the streets they got to listen to you.

Now, suddenly the provision in HR 4437 that makes illegal presence a felony is such a radioactive issue, that both Republicans and Democrats are disowning it.

And to top that, Frist and Hastert have issued a joint statement in the midst of congressional recess that the House and Senate Republicans agree to remove the criminalization of illegals presence. Even Sensenbrenner is backing out from his own provision in 4437.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/11/immigration/index.html

posmd
04-12-2006, 09:42 AM
http://biz.yahoo.com/usat/060411/13503957.html?.v=1

learning01
04-12-2006, 09:52 AM
I was watching Oprah and O'Reily on my Tivo yesterday. That made me write this.
This nation has always welcomed immigrants during the 19th century, 20th century, this decade and this year. Earlier it was an open arms welcome to immigrants; as long as this was European immigration there were no constraints. Then the immigration was needs based, attracting the best scientific and technological minds from around the world; here also as long as these immigrants were from Europe, there were no undue restraints. It is probably true ( I am no sociologist, but have a gut feeling) that this nation treats immigrants (either legal or illegal) from Europe and other nations differently. I understand the current issues of legal immigrants largely affect professionals from two countries.

America imports skills based and highly trained professionals freely; it is their law and practice. See the open arms welcome to doctorates, nurses and physiotherapists; at the same time, this nation is sliding into a ‘Dropout Nation’ in education. We must not miss that. Because of our education, skills and the professional contributions made to this country, we must be treated much more fairly; we must stress the enormous difficulties the we face to prospective legal immigrants. We should not be ashamed in writing to friends, newspapers back home. When America fails to attract the best talent, then everyone will pay attention to the issues of legal immigration here. It is a slow and long drawn process. We must start it now.

Where I get irked is for us, the skilled, highly trained and experienced workers, the rules were changed for Labor Clearance, I-485 filing., all to our disadvantage. The State Workforce Agencies were sitting on Labor Clearances for 3 to 4 years for lack of budget resources ( and probably the employers were happy and did nothing about that). Also, retrogression. It is not a new law, it is a departmental rule. In the last 4 years, nobody seems to have been bothered about that; not the law makers, not the statesmen and leaders, not the employers. Till recently, not even the affected folks, we, were dazzled and were mute spectators. In the coming days, we should double our activities and make this country aware of our issues. I request fellow members to volunteer more in their free time,to put seven issues, the cream of the cream, in a capsule and seven activities in a capsule; then act on the issues in the activities.
Suggestions for activities:
1. Write, fax and call senators and congressmen about these issues.
2. Contribute and participate in these forums.
3. Write to HR/Immigration Dept/Attorneys of corporations.
4. Write to news anchors, talk shows and reporters about the issues with links at IV
5. Participate in state IV activities
6. Solicit support from country, community associations and leaders in US.
7. Write to newspaper editors back in home countries.

The protests seem to be working
Well,

When you are out on the streets they got to listen to you.

Now, suddenly the provision in HR 4437 that makes illegal presence a felony is such a radioactive issue, that both Republicans and Democrats are disowning it.

cnag
04-12-2006, 11:18 AM
http://biz.yahoo.com/special/immigration06_article2.html

cool_guy_onnet1
04-12-2006, 11:44 AM
Looks like Kennedy is trying to wipe out bad memories and present himself as the goody two shoe on the immigration.
It all bils down to do we have 60 senates on our side- last time we were 22 short and after some negotiations I don't think it can happen 22 is big number.
We should concentrate on PACE and other reforms.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/12/washington/12kennedy.html?hp&ex=1144900800&en=da26462a68e7c68a&ei=5094&partner=homepage
Later,

nivasch
04-12-2006, 11:48 AM
http://biz.yahoo.com/special/immigration06_article1.html
http://biz.yahoo.com/usat/060411/13503957.html?.v=1

luckylavs
04-12-2006, 12:04 PM
I still dont understand, why we are mentioning demonstations by Illegals?

I see there is no one mentioning about whats happening for Legals. What is being done for the legals ..:confused: ..whats going on ... please update the members...

I request the Core members to please update the group ...

Thanks

wanna_immigrate
04-12-2006, 12:51 PM
http://www.forbes.com/entrepreneursmanagement/2006/03/27/google-intel-sun-cz_nr_0327immigrants.html

"Tech executives who crave highly skilled talent for research and development have felt the pinch of these tighter immigration policies. "The U.S. simply doesn't produce enough home-grown graduates in engineering and the hard sciences to meet our needs," says Intel (nasdaq: INTC - news - people ) Chairman Craig Barrett, who notes that while demand for engineers has increased over the last two decades, the number of U.S. graduates in those disciplines has declined. Barrett says that if companies such as Intel can't hire the talent that they need here, they will go abroad, risking even more American jobs than if they had just let the immigrants come into the U.S. in the first place.

So what if foreign-born business greats like Intel co-founder Andy Grove or Sun Microsystem's co-founder Vinod Khosla were turned away at the border? The answer is simple: Tens of thousands of American jobs could have been lost."


some of the immigrants that contributed greatly to US economy !!!
http://www.forbes.com/2006/03/27/cx_nr_immigrant_founders_slide.html

Andy Grove
Co-Founder, Intel
Country of Birth: Budapest, Hungary


Sergey Brin
President, Co-Founder, Google
Country of Birth: Moscow


Vinod Khosla
General Partner, Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers; one of four co-founders of Sun

Microsystems
Country of Birth: India



Pierre Omidyar
Founder and Chairman, eBay
Country of Birth: France

Jerry Yang
Co-Founder, Yahoo!
Country of Birth: Taiwan


Subrah Iyar
Co-founder, Chief Executive, WebEx Communications
Country of Birth: India


Suhas Patil
Founder, Cirrus Logic
Country of Birth: India


Sanjiv Sidhu
Founder, Chairman, i2 Technologies
Country of Birth: India

Jen-Hsun Huang
Co-Founder, Nvidia
Country of Birth: Taiwan

jkays94
04-12-2006, 01:09 PM
I still dont understand, why we are mentioning demonstations by Illegals?

I see there is no one mentioning about whats happening for Legals. What is being done for the legals ..:confused: ..whats going on ... please update the members...

I request the Core members to please update the group ...

Thanks

I believe this is already been done in the other threads including some of the most recent asking that IV members fax in support of the ammendments. Coincidentally several of today's posts on this News thread are on articles concerning legal immigrants which often do not get carried in the mainstream media and on developments in relation to comprehensive immigration reform.

learning01
04-12-2006, 02:27 PM
This is a nice piece and some us must thank Karen (krives@newsobserver.com) at krives@newsobserver.com
Karin Rives, Staff Writer (http://www.newsobserver.com/104/story/427793.html)
When the Senate immigration bill fell apart last week, it did more than stymie efforts to deal with illegal immigration.
It derailed efforts to deal with an equally vexing business concern: a backlog in applications for so-called green cards, the coveted cards that are actually pink or white and that offer proof of lawful permanent residency.

Many people now wait six years or longer for the card. There are 526,000 applications pending, according to Immigration Voice, an advocacy group that tracks government data.

Lately, this has prompted an exodus of foreign workers who tired of waiting, to return home or go further afield. With the economies in Asia and elsewhere on the rise, they can easily find work in the native countries or in third nations that are more generous with their visas.

"You have China, Russia, India -- a lot of countries where you can go and make a lot of money. That's the biggest thing that has changed," said Murali Bashyam, a Raleigh immigration lawyer who helps companies sponsor immigrants. "Before, people were willing to wait it out. Now they can do just as well going back home, and they do."

Mike Plueddeman said he lost three employees (one a senior programmer with a doctorate) at Durham-based DynPro in the past two years because they tired of waiting for their green cards.

All three found good jobs in their home countries within a few weeks of leaving Durham, said Plueddeman, the software consultancy's human resource director.

"We are talking about very well-educated and highly skilled people who have been in the labor force a long time," he said. "You hate losing them."

This budding brain drain comes as the first American baby boomers retire and projections show a huge need for such professionals in the years ahead. U.S. universities graduate about 70,000 information technology students annually. Many people say that number won't meet the need for a projected 600,000 additional openings for information systems professionals between 2002 and 2012, and the openings made by retirements.

"We just don't have the pipeline right now," said Joe Freddoso, director of Cisco Systems' Research Triangle Park operations. "We are concerned there's going to be a shortage, and we're already seeing that in some areas."

Cisco has advertised an opening for a data-security specialist in Atlanta for several months, unable to find the right candidate. Freddoso believes the problem will spread unless the government allows more foreign workers to enter the country, and expedites their residency process.

However, not everybody believes in the labor shortage that corporations fret about.

Critics say that proposals to allow more skilled workers into the country would only depress wages and displace American-born workers who have yet to fully recover from the dot-com bust.

"We should only issue work-related visas if we really need them," said Caroline Espinosa, a spokeswoman with NumbersUSA, a Washington, D.C., group pushing for immigration reduction. "There are 2.5 million native born American workers in the math and computer field who are currently out of work. It begs the question whether we truly need foreign workers."

She added that the immigration backlog would be aggravated by raising the cap for temporary and permanent visas, which would make it harder for those who deserve to immigrate to do so.

Waiting since 2003

Sarath Chandrand, 44, a software consultant from India, moved with his wife and two young daughters from Raleigh to Toronto in December because he couldn't live with more uncertainty. He applied for his green card in early 2003 and expects it will take at least two more years to get it.

His former employer continues to sponsor his application for permanent residency, hoping that he will eventually return. But Chandrand doesn't know what the future will hold.

"I miss Raleigh, the weather, the people," he said in a phone interview. "But it's a very difficult decision to make, once you've settled in a country, to move out. You go through a lot of mental strain. Making another move will be difficult."

Canada won him over because its residency process takes only a year and a half and doesn't require sponsorship from an employer.

The competition from Canada also worries Plueddeman, who said several of his employees are also applying for residency in both countries. "They'll go with whoever comes first," he said.

And it's not just India and Canada that beckon. New Zealand and Australia are among nations that actively market themselves to professionals in the United States, with perks such as an easy process to get work visas.

New Zealand, with a population of 4 million, has received more than 1,900 applications from skilled migrants and their families in the past two years, said Don Badman, the Los Angeles marketing director for that country's immigration agency. Of those, about 17 percent were non-Americans working in the United States.

Badman's team has hired a public relations agency to get the word out. They have also run ads in West Coast newspapers and attended trade shows, mainly to attract professionals in health care and information technology.

Dana Hutchison, an operating room nurse from Cedar Mountain south of Asheville, could have joined a hospital in the United States that offers fat sign-on bonuses. Instead, she's in the small town of Tauranga, east of Auckland, working alongside New Zealand nurses and doctors.

"It would be hard for me to work in the U.S. again," she said. Where she is now, "the working conditions are so fabulous. Everybody is friendly and much less stressed. It's like the U.S. was in the 1960s."

Limit of 140,000
Getting a green card was never a quick process. The official limit for employment-based green cards is 140,000 annually.

And there is a bottleneck of technology professionals from India and China. They hold many, if not most, of all temporary work visas, and many try to convert their work visa to permanent residency, and eventually full citizenship. But under current rules, no single nationality can be allotted more than 7 percent of the green cards.

In his February economic report, President Bush outlined proposals to overhaul the system for employment-based green cards:

* Open more slots by exempting spouses and children from the annual limit of 140,000 green cards. Such dependents now make up about half of all green card recipients, because workers sponsored by employers can include their family in the application.

* Replace the current cap with a "flexible market-based cap" that responds to the need that employers have for foreign workers.

* Raise the 7 percent limit for nations such as India that have many highly skilled workers.

After steady lobbying from technology companies, Congress is also paying more attention to the issue. The Senate immigration bill had proposed raising the annual cap for green cards to 290,000.

Kumar Gupta, a 33-year-old software engineer, has been watching the legislative proposals as he weighs his options. After six years in the United States, he is considering returning to India after learning that the green card he applied for in November 2004 could take another four or five years.

Being on a temporary work visa means that he cannot leave his job. Nor does he want to buy a home for his family without knowing he will stay in the country.

"Even if the job market is not as good as here, you can get a very good salary in India," he said. "If I have offers there, I will think of moving."

Also at : The Authority on VoIP, Call Centers, CRM, and Telecom (http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2006/04/12/1565829.htm)

learning01
04-12-2006, 07:00 PM
WASHINGTON, April 12 /U.S. Newswire/ -- Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid today sent the following letter to Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, urging him to bring immigration reform back before the Senate for debate at the earliest opportunity. Republican opposition may have derailed reform once, but the American people are calling on their government for action. Democrats remain committed to the comprehensive reform needed to secure our borders, and fix our broken immigration system.

The text of the letter is here: (http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=63965)

learning01
04-13-2006, 01:07 AM
Note: For those who want to make heads or tails of this immigration debate, here is a sober commentary.
learning01
Republicans Build Walls
By THOMAS BRAY April 12, 2006
Okay, the Democrats aren't offering much of an agenda beyond an effort to paint George W. Bush as a one-man axis of evil. But insofar as there is a Republican agenda these days, it seems to consist mostly of walls - walls against immigration, walls against foreign investment, walls against Asian goods and even walls to opportunity.

One of the more shocking examples was South Carolina GOP Senator Lindsey Graham's voyage to China, in company with New York Democratic Senator Charles Schumer, to threaten the Chinese government with monster tariffs if Beijing doesn't force up the value of its currency. Fortunately, after getting the TV time they desired, they called off their protectionist jihad - for now.
...............
This pull-up-the-drawbridge mentality is even more starkly on display in the immigration debate. The Republican House approved a measure that would make illegal immigration a felony and build 700 miles of literal wall along the Mexican border. The Senate is struggling to come up with something more balanced, including a "path" to citizenship for many of the estimated 12 million illegals already here, but Republicans are split and Democrats, sensing a political opportunity, are threatening to boycott the whole process.
...........
Besides, the surge of immigration needs to be kept in perspective. It's the result of some very good news, a long-running American economic boom that has kept unemployment of American citizens themselves at historic lows for much of the last three decades.
..........
Republicans, in short, are at risk of making themselves the handmaidens of protectionism, high taxes and fear of the "other." That will succeed only in placing the party on the side of pessimism - and earn it another trip to the political wilderness.

Mr. Bray is a Detroit News columnist.
Read it in full here and enrich yourself. (http://www.nysun.com/article/30853)

learning01
04-13-2006, 12:04 PM
US green card applicants heading elsewhere overseas (http://www.workpermit.com/news/2006_04_13/us/us_green_card_applicants_heading_elsewhere.htm)
13 April 2006
When the US senate failed to agree upon changes to US immigration laws concerning illegal immigrants and border control, these were not the only issues left pending. The questions of how to clear the backlog of green cards, and increasing the cap were left unanswered.

The average waiting period to get a green card is six years or longer and currently there are over half a million application pending, according to Immigration Voice, an advocacy group that tracks US government data.

With economies in Asia and the South Pacific on the rise, an exodus of foreign workers who are tired of waiting, are either returning home or choosing to work elsewhere overseas.

With the "baby boomer generation" reaching retirement age, Joe Freddoso director of Cisco Systems Research Triangle Park is concerned there is going to be a shortage of skilled professionals to replace them.

"US universities graduate about 70,000 information technology students annually. Many predict that number won't meet the need for a projected 600,000 additional openings for IT professionals between 2002 and 2012, and the openings created by retirements," said Freddoso.

Freddoso believes the problem will spread unless the government allows more foreign workers to enter the country, and speed up their residency process.

Some critics say increasing the numbers of skilled foreign workers would depress wages and take positions away from American workers.

"We should only issue work-related visas if we really need them," said Caroline Espinosa, a spokeswoman with Numbers USA, a group pushing for immigration reduction. "There are 2.5 million native born American workers in the math and computer field who are currently out of work. It begs the question whether we truly need foreign workers."

Competition for skilled labour is on the increase, Canada, India, New Zealand and Australia are among countries that aggressively market themselves to professionals in the US, and offer faster processing of work permits and immigration applications.

This year New Zealand has received 1,900 skilled work permit applications, and of those 17% were people working in the US.

After steady lobbying from technology companies, Congress is also paying more attention to the issue. The breakdown in the Senate April 7, left undecided the proposal of raising of the annual cap for green cards to 290,000.

In his February economic report, President Bush outlined proposals to overhaul the system for employment-based green cards.

Bush's proposals were to exempt spouses and children from the annual limit of 140,000 green cards. Dependents make up about half of all green cards issued annually.

Secondly, to replace the existing cap with a flexible market based cap that responds to the needs employers have for employing foreign labour.

And finally, to raise the seven percent limit for green cards issued to nations such as India that have many highly skilled workers.

baburob2
04-13-2006, 01:00 PM
The comprehensive immigration bill including agreed Hagel-Martinez amendments is attached.

Below are the excepts from AILA
Text of the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006, as Modified in Bipartisan Negotiations During Senate Floor Consideration
Cite as "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 06041362 (posted Apr. 13, 2006)"


S. 2611 and S. 2612 reflect the Hagel-Martinez compromise modifying the Senate Judiciary Committee's immigration reform bill plus a variety of new provisions (including some of the amendments that were pending when the bill was pulled from the Floor by Senator Frist). Though the bills are identical in content except for the order of the sponsors, S. 2611 and S. 2612 would be subject to different procedural paths. The bill with Specter as the lead sponsor could be treated as a new bill that could be marked up in the Judiciary Committee once again. The bill with Hagel and Martinez as the lead sponsors could be brought straight to the Senate Floor under Rule 14.

learning01
04-13-2006, 01:31 PM
There was a time in late 70's in India when a whole bunch of 'I am the greatest' type members of the lower and law making body (Lok Sabha) were thrown out at the ballot. The clinching slogan of the winning party "We give a government that works". I am certainly turning nostalgic here and see a similarity. For example, read these two articles and draw your own conclusions. My conclusion, we pray for a government that works and takes care of issues like these AND issues/ problems with legal immigration and Green Cards
-learning01


CBS News : Illegal Workers – For The Government?
GRONTON, Conn., April 12, 2006
(CBS) It's a little after 7 a.m. and work is already in full swing at this Groton, Conn., construction site, the future home of military housing for officers serving at the nearby Trident Submarine Base.

The U.S. military sub-contractor pouring cement at this site — Gargiulo Construction — says its payroll is completely in order. But in reality, some papers are fake. CBS News correspondent Armen Keteyian reports the group is undocumented workers.
...
Despite dozens of arrests at military bases around the country, government construction sites continue to be fertile ground for undocumented workers, something Centex, the Texas-based conglomerate who has contracts with the federal government, was hesitant to discuss.
Read it here in full at CBSnews.com: (http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/04/12/eveningnews/main1494828.shtml)

ABC News: Singapore Woos Top U.S. Scientists
Singapore woos top US scientists with offers of new labs, research money
By PAUL ELIAS AP Biotechnology Writer

CHICAGO Apr 12, 2006 (AP)— Singapore's siren song is growing increasingly more irresistible for scientists, especially stem cell researchers who feel stifled by the U.S. government's restrictions on their field.

Two prominent California scientists are the latest to defect to the Asian city-state, announcing earlier this month that they, too, had fallen for its glittering acres of new laboratories outfitted with the latest gizmos.

They weren't the first defections, and Singapore officials at the Biotechnology Organization's annual convention in Chicago this week promise they won't be the last.

Other Asian countries, including Japan, South Korea and even China, are also here touting their burgeoning biotechnology spending to the 20,000 scientists and biotechnology executives attending the conference.
......Read it here in full at abcnews.com: (http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=1835594&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312)

learning01
04-13-2006, 07:15 PM
We all know mud slingling is going on the failed Senate compromise on Comprehensive Immigration Legislation (CIL). Let's follow a few of them and try to come up with a pretty good picture of what happened. It will tell us the shape of things on Apr 24. Here is Sen.Kerry's statement on that:

But Sen. John Kerry said a majority of senators had reached an agreement on the immigration bill and, by common Senate practice, had agreed not to consider outside amendments that would change that agreement.

"Senator Frist and the Republicans were unable to hold their part of the agreement," Kerry, D-Mass., told NBC's "Meet the Press." He blamed the Republicans' "own internal squabble" for the Senate not passing an immigration bill.

Link (http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/14305476.htm)

Sen.Harry Reid:
"If the president is serious about moving forward, then he should join me in calling on Senator Frist to bring immigration reform back to the Senate floor when we return" from a two-week recess, Reid said.

"Hopefully, by then, President Bush and his majority leader will have found the backbone to stop the extreme elements of the Republican Party from blocking improvements to America's security," Reid said.


President G.W.Bush:
NYT : Bush Blames Democrat for Immigration Impasse (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/13/washington/13cnd-bush.html?hp&ex=1144987200&en=5eab38dfea15243e&ei=5094&partner=homepage)
WASHINGTON, April 13 — President Bush lashed out today at the Senate's Democratic leader, Harry Reid of Nevada, accusing him of using gimmickry to stall an immigration bill that millions of Americans want enacted.

sobers
04-13-2006, 08:53 PM
http://www.startribune.com/191/story/367832.html

Good story....focuses on the limited availability of EB visas...

IV Admin: The writer Katherine Kersten (kkersten@startribune.com) can be contacted for additional stories on the subject ...since she's already on it..maybe you guys have sort of a template you can send

posmd
04-13-2006, 09:23 PM
http://www.startribune.com/191/story/367832.html

Good story....focuses on the limited availability of EB visas...

IV Admin: The writer Katherine Kersten (kkersten@startribune.com) can be contacted for additional stories on the subject ...since she's already on it..maybe you guys have sort of a template you can send


Wonderful idea to contact her. She really hit the nail on the head. It has appeal to many americans and their way of thinking.

tdasara
04-13-2006, 11:52 PM
I emailed her and here was her quick response

You will enjoy the column I am doing for Monday. It is about the plight of people like you. Thanks so much for writing. You have confirmed everything I have read.

I am astonished that our law is so short-sighted. America has a very great need for people like you.

jkays94
04-14-2006, 03:31 AM
More propaganda courtesy of Lou Dobbs and the Programmers Guild against H1-Bs.

http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/business/2006/04/13/tucker.cheap.labor.cnn

Foreign labor sinks U.S. wages
Cheap foreign labor is holding back wages of middle-class Americans. CNN's Bill tucker reports (April 13)

jkays94
04-14-2006, 03:37 AM
CNN goes after the pro-immigration lobby. Either way it seems they acknowledge that lobbying is making a big difference (and in the process of doing so, they ofcourse had to mention H1-Bs while portraying NumbersUSA in good light).

http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/business/2006/04/13/sylvester.amnesty.agenda.cnn

Immigration creates odd allies

CNN's Lisa Sylvester reports on how lobbyists are helping to secure cheap labor for top companies. (April 13)

learning01
04-14-2006, 08:59 AM
By JIM RUTENBERG Published: April 14, 2006

WASHINGTON, April 13 — The White House is fast at work recalibrating how best to use the power of the presidency to save immigration legislation from languishing for the rest of the year, eager for a victory in what has been a difficult political season for President Bush.

Until late last week, Mr. Bush had, at least publicly, stayed to the side of the warring between factions of his party, and the Democrats, as the Senate hashed out a compromise between sealing the nation's borders and legalizing the illegal work force already here without granting what opponents could call "amnesty."

This week, Mr. Bush has placed himself at the vanguard of the issue, publicly lacerating the Senate minority leader, Harry Reid, of Nevada, for blocking the legislation last week on procedural grounds.

On Thursday, Mr. Bush accused Mr. Reid of "single-handedly thwarting the will of the American people and impeding bipartisan efforts to secure this border, and make this immigration system of ours more humane and rational."

..............
When White House aides alerted Mr. Bush that last-minute parliamentary procedures had scuttled Senate approval of compromise legislation late Thursday, he met them with disbelief.

Impatient with explanations of the technicalities, he wondered aloud how an agreement announced just that morning was suddenly dead, according to a meeting participant who was granted anonymity to speak freely about the encounter.

That chagrin seems to have galvanized the president in his comments singling out Mr. Reid.

Read it in full at New York Times newspaper online: (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/14/washington/14bush.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)


Same story here at gainsville.com, On the border: Will Bush step in? (http://www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060414/WIRE/204140330/1117/news)

nk2006
04-14-2006, 09:37 AM
http://www.forbes.com/business/2006/04/13/immigration-alien-borders-cx_0414oxford.html

A good summary/analysis of what happened and what might happen. Especially see the following comment:
“The debate last week revealed that the political interests in favor of immigration are much stronger than their opponents in the Senate. In the current political environment, both parties are likely to decide that comprehensive reform is impossible to achieve, and start to attach the least objectionable provisions to other bills”.
Based on accusing statements from both parties it seems they already came to the conclusion that nothing might happen and start covering their bases (appearing to be immig friendly and catch as many Hispanic votes as possible even if the bill does not come out). Article also talk about how Carl Rove (president’s strategist) is struggling to come up with a plan to appease all three vote blocs of Bush/Republican party: (i) ultra conservative / south state republicans (ii) business community that needs both skilled and unskilled workers (iii) Hispanics – and their emergence as a ‘bloc”.

nk2006
04-14-2006, 09:47 AM
(The full article that I quoted above; from Oxford Analytica)

UNITED STATES: Immigration reform will be piecemeal
Thursday, April 13 2006

Relevant Profiles: United States |

EVENT: Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators marched in cities across the country on April 10 to protest the House's efforts to criminalise undocumented immigrants.
SIGNIFICANCE: The Senate failed to pass a comprehensive immigration reform bill on April 7, which would have tightened border controls while offering most undocumented migrants a path to citizenship. Congressional leaders have promised a renewed effort to push through legislation reconciling business, security and humanitarian concerns.
ANALYSIS: Last week's failed Senate immigration bill addressed most of the elements essential to workable reform. However, it would have confronted House Republicans, who had passed an enforcement-only bill criminalising 'illegal' immigration in December, with the prospect of legalising most of the 12 million undocumented migrants in the country, and the institution of a large-scale guest worker programme. House negotiators were likely to challenge these provisions in conference committee. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter has vowed a renewed effort to craft a compromise when Congress returns from recess on April 24. However, workable reform legislation may not be passed this year.

Roadmap for reform? Although the Senate immigration reform bill was rushed, overly complicated (over 500 pages long), and flawed, it may comprise the core of a future reform plan. The three main elements were controls, compassion and competitiveness:

Controls. The bill's immigration enforcement measures, designed to placate 'nativist' political sentiment, would have included:

new resources for border and interior controls (including expanding detention facilities by 10,000 beds) and new powers for border inspectors to exclude prospective entrants at ports of entry;
making profits from the 'people-trafficking' and other offences subject to money-laundering statutes;
criminalising many forms of illegal immigration for both immigrants and their employers -- the latter would face escalating fines for employing unauthorised workers; and
mandating greater cooperation between federal, state and local authorities on immigration control issues.
The Senate rejected two of the most severe provisions of the House's December legislation (see UNITED STATES: Congress considers immigration reform - December 15, 2005): criminalising material assistance to illegal immigrants by religious organisations or humanitarian groups, and making undocumented status a felony. These measures aroused the ire of recent immigrants and church groups -- particularly Catholics (see UNITED STATES: Immigration bill risk to Bush coalition - April 5, 2006).

Compassion. The Senate bill would have afforded the overwhelming majority of the United States' 12 million illegally resident immigrants an opportunity to "earn" legal status. However, it would have treated various elements of this population differently:

Long-time residents. Those who have lived in the country for more than five years would qualify for permanent residence after six additional years of temporary legal status, demonstrating their ability to remain employed in the formal economy (and pay taxes), learn English, and pass a civics test. They would also be required to maintain a clean police record and pay a 2,000 dollar fine. Some 7 million immigrants fall into this category.
Medium-term residents. Immigrants that have resided in the United States for two to five years would be given temporary legal status and the opportunity to earn permanent status. However, permanent residence would not be guaranteed, and permanent visas would be limited (implying long wait times). Moreover, immigrants would be forced to apply for status adjustments abroad. More than 3 million immigrants belong to this group.
New arrivals. Migrants who have spent less than two years in the country would be required to leave, although they would be able to apply for visas (including the bill's expanded guest worker visas) without prejudice. Some 1.5 million people may fall into this category.
Business competitiveness. The bill acknowledged that, in the global marketplace, it is essential to have a competitive labour pool. It proposed dramatically expanding the annual issuance of work visas, and permanent employment-based visas would nearly triple. Permanent and temporary visas for semi-skilled and unskilled workers in essential service industries would grow into the hundreds of thousands, and most of those entering under temporary visas would be given an opportunity to stay permanently after several years. Moreover, it also streamlined the entry requirements for highly skilled workers and foreign students in mathematics, science, engineering and technology (see UNITED STATES: Export controls will affect research - December 9, 2005):

Guest workers. Approximately 400,000 temporary workers would have been allowed to enter the country and fill low-skilled jobs. This number would be adjusted each year, based on the previous year's demand.
Highly skilled workers. The number of H-1B temporary visas for high-skilled workers would increase from 65,000 to 115,000. Furthermore, the worker's immediate family would no longer be counted against that cap -- a provision that doubles the available visas. Foreign nationals with advanced degrees in the sciences would be exempt from the cap. The number of visas would be adjusted each year based on the previous year's demand.
Foreign students. A new visa category would be created for international students pursuing advanced degrees in the sciences. These students could obtain employment related to their field of study and adjust to permanent resident status once they completed their degree. Studying in the United States would also have been encouraged by permitting students to work off campus and extending the allowed length of 'optional practical training'. This was designed to allow more time for graduates to find an employer.
White House position. The White House's recent public statements on immigration reform have been a study in ambiguity. President George Bush's chief political strategist, Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove, is attempting to tread a difficult line between anti-immigration conservatives, and pro-immigration business and Hispanic groups. When the debate moved to the Senate floor last week, the White House issued an official statement opposing both "amnesty" and an "automatic path to citizenship." However, when the Senate's short-lived compromise deal appeared likely to pass, the president encouraged its authors to work with the House to reconcile their versions of the legislation.

Pro-immigration faction. The debate last week revealed that the political interests in favour of immigration are much stronger than their opponents in the Senate. This powerful coalition includes US economic interests, the immigrants themselves, pro-immigrant non-governmental organisations, and the home countries of undocumented migrants (mostly in Latin America). Conservative nativists, and their supporters in the House Republican caucus, who backed stiff enforcement and expulsion measures, were well outside the mainstream of opinion in the Senate.

Piecemeal reform outlook. In the current political environment, both parties are likely to decide that comprehensive reform is impossible to achieve, and start to attach the least objectionable provisions to other bills. The measures most likely to be enacted include:

expanded visas to qualified specialists (nurses, medical attendants, physical therapists, etc), foreign students, and semi-skilled and unskilled 'essential' workers in low value-added services (especially the hospitality industry);
giving some minors who are in the United States illegally, and attending school, a chance to gain legal status;
offering some long-term illegal residents a chance to earn legal status; and
providing the chance to earn legal status and continued access to the US labour market to some unauthorised immigrants on an industry-by-industry or sector-by-sector basis (particularly the agricultural sector).
CONCLUSION: The enforcement-only bill that passed the House in December was an unenforceable, and potentially economically disastrous, piece of legislation. The Senate compromise bill, which foundered last week, offered a more workable blueprint for change. However, its defeat probably means that only piecemeal immigration reform is politically feasible this year.
Keywords: NA, United States, Latin America, economy, politics, social, government, immigration, legislation, reform, industry, agriculture, education, security, services, welfare

ragz4u
04-14-2006, 11:49 AM
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArti cle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137835365986&path=!localnews&s=1037645509099

I love how they have called a med student 'super educated' (not that I have any objections to it). If thats super educated, what would one call someone who has completed med school, completed residency after that and is now doing fellowship (super speciality)!

Going by the stories I am getting from fellow IV members, we have a ton of 'super super super educated' folks here.

nk2006
04-14-2006, 02:08 PM
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2006/04/13/EDGNSGUB8Q1.DTL

A very anti-democrat piece, but it gives one perspective on how democrat senators are playing politics. There is some truth in that, they dont want to give any credit to Bush/Republican for passing a pro-immigration bill but at the same time want to keep the Hispanic vote bloc and some labor union support.

These are all vote bank politics we saw so many times in India and elsewhere. I hope there will be more critical articles/views on both republicans and democrats especially in key states; which might force the leaders to come up with some compromise.

learning01
04-14-2006, 03:17 PM
Hispanics should say 'gracias' to three anti-Latin zealots (http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/columnists/14330181.htm)

By Andres Oppenheimer (aoppenheimer@MiamiHerald.com) April 14, 2006
aoppenheimer@MiamiHerald.com

On behalf of the 40 million Hispanics in the United States, I extend my gratitude to the three people who have done the most to energize the "Latino power" in the United States: immigrant-phobic Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis.; CNN's Lou Dobbs; and Harvard professor Sam Huntington.


More propaganda courtesy of Lou Dobbs and the Programmers Guild against H1-Bs.

http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/business/2006/04/13/tucker.cheap.labor.cnn

Foreign labor sinks U.S. wages
Cheap foreign labor is holding back wages of middle-class Americans. CNN's Bill tucker reports (April 13)

learning01
04-14-2006, 03:34 PM
How to Lose the Brain Race
By STEVEN CLEMONS and MICHAEL LIND
clemons@newamerica.net and lind@newamerica.net
Published: April 10, 2006

IS the United States importing too many immigrant physicists and not enough immigrant farm workers? You might think so, to judge from two provisions that Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, added to the comprehensive immigration reform package that just fell apart in the Senate.
.....

Combined, the two proposals sent a message to the rest of the world: send us your brawn, not your brains.

.....
But her priorities reflect in many ways those of Congress as a whole. Congress seems to believe that while the United States must be protected from an invasion of educated, bright and ambitious foreign college students, scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs, we can never have too many low-wage fruit-pickers and dishwashers.

In making immigration laws, Congress caters to cheap-labor industries like agribusiness and sweatshop manufacturing while shortchanging the high-tech, high-wage industries on which the future of the American economy depends. Witness the Senate bill's provision to admit 400,000 temporary workers a year, or roughly four million a decade, in addition to the 12 million mostly low-wage illegal immigrants already here, many of whose status would be legalized. Few if any of those guest workers would go to universities, corporate campuses or innovation clusters like Silicon Valley. They would head straight to restaurants, hotels and plantation-like farms.

While the United States perversely tries to corner the market in uneducated hotel maids and tomato harvesters, other industrial democracies are reshaping their immigration policies to invite the skilled immigrants that we turn away. Britain is following Australia and Canada in adopting a points system that gives higher scores to skilled immigrants with advanced education and proficiency in English. British, Canadian, German and even French universities are overflowing in undergraduate and graduate enrollment as they absorb the foreign talent that America is repelling.

....
In recent years, skilled immigration to the United States has been accommodated chiefly by the H-1B visa program. But like all guest-worker programs, the H-1B program pits American workers against foreign workers lacking full legal and political rights. Because H-1B workers depend on employer sponsorship to remain in this country, unscrupulous employers can blackmail them into working longer hours for lower pay than American workers. Skilled workers admitted under a points system, by contrast, would be able to quit their employers in the United States and find new ones at will without risk of deportation.

What the space race was to the cold war, the "brain race" is to today's peaceful global economic competition. The comprehensive immigration reform America needs is one that slashes unskilled immigration and creates a skill-rewarding points system modeled on those of Australia, Britain and Canada. In encouraging skilled labor, Congress for a change might perform some of its own.

Read it in full at NYT (no login required): (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/10/opinion/10Clemons.html?_r=3&th&emc=th&oref=slogin&oref=slogin&oref=slogin)

Also here at New America Foundation (http://www.newamerica.net/index.cfm?pg=article&DocID=2985)

jkays94
04-14-2006, 05:55 PM
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2006/04/13/EDGNSGUB8Q1.DTL

A very anti-democrat piece, but it gives one perspective on how democrat senators are playing politics. There is some truth in that, they dont want to give any credit to Bush/Republican for passing a pro-immigration bill but at the same time want to keep the Hispanic vote bloc and some labor union support.

From the article :

After the Senate Judiciary Committee put out a guest-worker bill, AFL-CIO President John Sweeney issued a statement saying: "Guest-workers programs are a bad idea and harm all workers."

I wonder if the writer bothered to research his facts or whether this is an attempt to mislead the public, the AFL-CIO President was at the DC rally on April 10 where he spoke in support of the cause (as were several other union leaders) and was loudly cheered and applauded. On the flip side 400+ ammendments could not have been debated, discussed and voted on in 2 days (a deadline set by Frist).

http://blog.aflcio.org/?p=438

Events are scheduled in at least 72 cities, including Washington, D.C., where AFL-CIO President John Sweeney will join a massive rally on the National Mall between 7th and 14th streets, N.W., at 4 p.m. to call on Congress to end the criminalization and abuse of immigrant workers and to defeat the draconian anti-immigrant legislation passed by the House in December. AFL-CIO Executive Vice President Linda Chavez-Thompson will join Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.), Laborers President Terence O’Sullivan and Transport Workers Local 100 President Roger Toussaint for a rally at New York’s City Hall (Broadway, Park Roe Chambers Street) at 3 p.m. for a huge demonstration of ethnic and immigrant solidarity.

Appu
04-14-2006, 07:18 PM
From the article :
I wonder if the writer bothered to research his facts or whether this is an attempt to mislead the public, the AFL-CIO President was at the DC rally on April 10 where he spoke in support of the cause (as were several other union leaders) and was loudly cheered and applauded.

May be he did do the research and then decided to misquote him. That is a correct statement taken out of context. Sweeney opposed the guest worker program because "it creates a second class status" for these workers. But he supported other provisions, such as granting citizenship.

yabadaba
04-14-2006, 07:44 PM
Foreign Exchange: The Immigration Question
In an excerpt from his weekly PBS TV show, Fareed Zakaria talks to two experts on the issue.

learning01
04-15-2006, 11:52 AM
Business Lobbyists Call for Action on Immigration

By KATE PHILLIPS Published: April 15, 2006

WASHINGTON, April 14 — As Democrats and Republicans remain at an impasse over immigration proposals, business lobbies and trade groups have turned to their grass-roots partners to put hometown pressure on lawmakers during the two-week Congressional recess.

Lobbyists representing small and big businesses, who had staked out the Senate night and day and had flown in produce growers by the hundreds in recent months for rallies and meetings with lawmakers, were disappointed over the failure of a deal in the Senate that would have put millions of illegal immigrants on a path to citizenship. Now the trade groups plan a concerted push in the days after the Easter holiday to contact lawmakers as they tour their home states.
...........

Read it here in full at NYT.com (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/15/us/15lobby.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)

MerciesOfInjustices
04-15-2006, 12:02 PM
Here is an interesting opinion from a Liberal-leaning journalist. It is an opinion piece posted on msnbc.com, and reveals that indeed the Dems were the real culprits against us.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12319141/site/newsweek/

The Original Old-Fashioned Liberal
by Eleanor Clift

The descendant of Irish immigrants, Ted Kennedy badly wanted a reform bill. In the end, his own party stopped him.

Appu
04-15-2006, 02:42 PM
Here is an interesting opinion from a Liberal-leaning journalist. It is an opinion piece posted on msnbc.com, and reveals that indeed the Dems were the real culprits against us.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12319141/site/newsweek/

The Original Old-Fashioned Liberal
by Eleanor Clift

I tend to believe her, she is a staunch liberal so she probably got the story right from good sources.

But overall, the delay is probably doing more good than bad - the extreme
republican group - Sensenbrenner and co - have now softened their stance. That must help a better - fairer - bill to go through the House.

mrajatish
04-16-2006, 04:35 AM
http://www.forbes.com/business/2006/04/13/immigration-alien-borders-cx_0414oxford.html

prabirmehta
04-16-2006, 12:50 PM
http://www.townhall.com/opinion/columns/jeffjacoby/2006/04/13/193548.html
Excerpt: Happily, the problem can be solved: Congress has only to remove the annual quota on visas for immediate relatives of legal permanent residents, thereby clearing up the backlog and eliminating the long wait. Legislation introduced by Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska would make that change. An alternative solution, offered by Representative Robert Andrews of New Jersey, would allow the spouse and minor children of green-card holders to enter the United States on a special "V visa," and to live here while waiting for their immigration petitions to be approved.

Unlike the illegal immigrants who have been raising such a ruckus across the country in recent days, green-card holders like Sumathi broke no laws to get here. Most of them are highly skilled professionals who eventually become US citizens, enriching their adopted country in the time-honored immigrant manner.

"I came here legally," says Sumathi, who develops speech recognition software for use in health care settings. "I'm making a contribution. I pay my taxes. I've never been a burden to the government. My husband is a doctor whose work on polio is saving lives. Why must we be separated like this?" She observes tartly that the United States lectures other countries about the importance of marriage and family. Yet "US immigration law is destroying my family life. I live alone, eat alone, sleep alone, cry alone, and suffer alone. . . . The only thing that keeps me going is my husband's photograph sitting next to me."

mrajatish
04-16-2006, 10:39 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=1849047
http://niemanwatchdog.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=background.view&backgroundid=0084