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Old 10-13-2006, 02:11 PM
chanduv23 chanduv23 is offline
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Mar-06
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I140 Mailed Date
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06/11/2006
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India
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If someone is giving you trouble after you left the company - IT IS NOT A GOOD COMPANY WITH GOOD ETHICS. If you think the HR is being a pain in the ass, try sending a decent email to the chairman of the company explaining that you are having trouble and would dfinitely need help. In most cases, they will never want to make a former employee feel bad about leaving the company. if that does not help, try getting a letterhead from a friend. Most people follow this practice. This is the best way. You can have a trusted manager or a collegue give you a good resignation letter informally. It does not always have to be the HR. When I left my company in India in 2000, the company was giving me hard time, and HR was doing all sorts of things legally, but offline, without anyone's knowledge, he gave me all documents I need and just told me to go peacefully.
About financial settlement, I think as long as you don't bother the HR, you will not have any issues. So try to get a letter from anyone who you think is your friend and willing to help you. You can even get a letter from the client if you think you have good relationship with the client.
Good luck
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Greened on September 10th, 2010
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