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Old 02-05-2006, 07:04 PM
logiclife logiclife is offline
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This article has an overall competitiveness argument saying that the American Competitiveness is not under a threat.

The PACE act is to protect that IN ADVANCE from happening...ie. having the american competitiveness under a threat from India and China.

I am going to discredit one argument in his article:

He says: We do an outstanding job of education for people ages 18 to 65. I beg to differ. If that is his argument to claim that there is no shortage of talent, then he ought to read a survey report funded by Pew Charitable research. The tools used was the same used by National Assessment of Adult Literacy, the government's examination of English literacy among adults.

Quote:
More than 50% of students at four-year schools and more than 75% at two-year colleges lacked the skills to perform complex literacy tasks.

That means they could not interpret a table about exercise and blood pressure, understand the arguments of newspaper editorials, compare credit card offers with different interest rates and annual fees or summarize results of a survey about parental involvement in school.


The survey examined college and university students nearing the end of their degree programs. The students did the worst on matters involving math, according to the study.

Almost 20% of students pursuing four-year degrees had only basic quantitative skills. For example, the students could not estimate if their car had enough gas to get to the service station. About 30% of two-year students had only basic math skills.
The full article was published recently on all major media outlets including CNN, MSNBC and USA today.


http://www.cnn.com/2006/EDUCATION/01...e.students.ap/


http://www.usatoday.com/news/educati...ge-tasks_x.htm

Last edited by logiclife; 02-06-2006 at 12:24 PM.
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