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pa_arora
03-26-2008, 01:53 PM
Nice article in NY times....way to go.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/24/nyregion/24visas.html?ex=1364184000&en=c5f17b2e38d7c503&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

-p

newuser
03-26-2008, 02:14 PM
^^^^

CantLeaveAmerica
03-26-2008, 02:26 PM
Nice to get news coverage on the issue...hope it reaches the lawmakers 'ears of the dire need for visa reforms!

webm
03-26-2008, 02:50 PM
Nice article..Congressional should see this and improve their Immi laws and help the foreign nationals who dealt with this more and more H1B/AOS processing delays.

zerozerozeven
03-26-2008, 03:00 PM
I dont believe that the immigration delays we are experiencing are caused by lack of attention or wrong thought process but more of willful neglect and disdain by the government and the USCIS. They never have shown any real intent of cleaning up the mess and the policy makers are infact smiling behind the scenes seeing the immigration becoming excessively long and cumbersome. The only way the issue can be resolved is to make these guys feel the pain because of this possibly in the economy and the resultant exodus of jobs to other countries.
One thing I have learned being in the US, sympathy gets you nowhere other a couple of words of consolation. The only way to make things change is to make the other person feel the pain

amitga
03-26-2008, 04:47 PM
Anything that does not get additional votes in the election is not going to be addressed this year. Immigration is the last thing law makers would like to touch this year.

pa_arora
03-27-2008, 05:02 PM
Anything that does not get additional votes in the election is not going to be addressed this year. Immigration is the last thing law makers would like to touch this year.
according to the things which r going on..you might be wrong.
For details hop on to the Member's forums.

needhelp!
03-27-2008, 06:47 PM
Gaurav Gaur, for example, an Indian who earned his M.B.A. from Cornell in 2004, said he seized the chance to leave New York last year for London to work for Barclays (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/barclays_plc/index.html?inline=nyt-org), though it meant turning his back on opportunities at Bloomberg L.P. (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/bloomberg_lp/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and other American companies.“The whole visa situation was one of the biggest reasons that I took the job,” Mr. Gaur said in a telephone interview from London, where he is a senior project manager for the British bank. “I didn’t want to keep going through this uncertainty — it’s just a nightmare.”

In New York, Mr. Gaur, 33, had managed to secure one of the three-year visas for professionals known as H-1B visas, and he probably could have renewed it for another three years, he said. But after that he knew he would be faced with the prospect of year-to-year renewals while he waited in a long and unpredictable line for permanent residency — and remained tethered to whatever company was sponsoring him for a green card.

Moreover, he said, his wife, Bhavna, who has a master’s degree in social work from Washington University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/w/washington_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) in St. Louis, had work visa woes of her own in a field where few employers were familiar with the H-1B program.
In Britain, he said, “it’s drastically different.” There is no cap on work visas, and since he had a work permit, his wife was automatically allowed to work; she quickly found a good social work job.

“If I stay here for five years,” he added, “I automatically become eligible for a green card, for permanent residency.”“I didn’t want to keep going through this uncertainty — it’s just a nightmare.”