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asdqwe2k
01-04-2007, 10:23 AM
http://www.expressindia.com/fullstory.php?newsid=79094&headline='Without~Indians,~US~economy~won't~be~sam e'

Houston, January 4: Indian immigrants are a significant driving force behind the creation of new engineering and technology companies in the United States in the past decade than their counterparts from the UK, China, Taiwan and Japan put together.


Of an estimated 73-hundred US tech startups founded by immigrants, 26 per cent have Indian founders, CEOs, presidents or head researchers, a new study says.

"Indians have beaten the Chinese in start-up hotbeds like Silicon Valley with a share of 15.5 per cent, up from 7 per cent between 1980 to 1998," says the study, ‘Silicon Valley's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs’, by researchers in the master of engineering management programme at the Pratt School of Engineering at the Duke University.

The study, which covered 28,766 firms with annual sales of more than USD 1 million and 20 or more employees, comes nearly eight years after an influential report from the University of California, Berkeley, on the impact of foreign-born entrepreneurs.



"This study shows the tremendous contribution immigrants in general and Indians in particular are making to the US economy and global competitiveness. This is a win-win for America and for the immigrants that make it here," Vivek Wadhwa, Delhi-born Duke's executive in residence and the founder of two tech startups in North Carolina's Research Triangle said.

Wadhwa, project's lead researcher, stressed that "the country should make the most of its ability to "get the best and brightest from around the world."

"Indians constitute less than one per cent of the US population and are starting many times the businesses as other groups. They are creating jobs and contributing tens of billions to the US economy. Without Indian entrepreneurs, it would not be the same", Wadhwa said.

AnnaLee Saxenian, study co-author and dean of the School of Information at UC-Berkeley, estimated immigrants founded about 25 per cent of Silicon Valley tech companies in 1999.

The Duke study found the percentage had more than doubled, to 52 per cent in 2005. The research debunks some recent myths about the notion that immigrants who come to the United States take jobs from Americans.

"The advantage of entrepreneurs is that they're generally creating new opportunities and new wealth that didn't even exist before them," Saxenian said.

"Just by leaving your home country, you're taking a risk, and that means you're willing to take risks in business. You put them in an environment that supports entrepreneurship, and this is the logical outcome."

Immigrants from the UK set up 7.1 per cent of the companies, followed by China with 6.9 per cent and Taiwan with 5.8 per cent.

Immigrant entrepreneurs' companies employed 450,000 workers and generated USD 52 billion in sales in 2005, according to the survey.

The share of Chinese and Taiwanese start-ups, which was 17 per cent in 1990-98 period, came down to 12.8 per cent between 1995 and 2005. The report adds that the number of Indian scientists and engineers in Silicon Valley has grown by 646 per cent between 1990 and 2000.

Indian immigrants dominated even on a state-wise basis. While in New Jersey, the share of Indian start-ups was a whopping 47 per cent, in Texas, it stood at 25 per cent. This was followed by California with 20 per cent, Florida with 18 per cent, New York with 14 per cent and Massachusetts with 10 per cent.

The study reveals that California, which houses the Silicon Valley, has emerged as the favourite destination for immigrant Indian entrepreneurs.

Around 26 per cent Indian startups were set up there. Around 36 per cent companies in the software sector were Indian, while in the innovation and manufacturing-related services, the figure was 24 per cent. In semiconductors, Indian start-ups shared the top place with the Chinese with a share of 15 per cent each.

However, the Indians failed to dominate in sectors like computers and communications, where their share stood at 15 per cent, lower than the Chinese (19 per cent) and Taiwanese (17 per cent).

The study shows that the largest number of companies started by Indians are in the software sector (46 per cent), followed by start-ups in the innovation and manufacturing-related services (44 per cent).

The Duke study found that 52 per cent of Silicon Valley companies -- and 39 per cent of California startups -- were founded by foreign-born entrepreneurs.

zephyrus
01-04-2007, 10:32 AM
http://memp.pratt.duke.edu/downloads/americas_new_immigrant_entrepreneurs.pdf

msyedy
01-04-2007, 10:53 AM
There are many many articles like this. Search in this forum you will find tons.
Congress did not listen to the president, the lobbyist what will this article make a difference.

Our aim is to help IV to get a bill pass not to go into articles that says

Someone says Congress has to pass CIR this year.
Congress is working to pass CIR by early summer.

Our aim should be to help push Congress to give temp relief IV is trying for.

We shall overcome

harsh
01-04-2007, 11:41 AM
Very interesting and inspiring article. Especially what it says about the immigrant entrepreneurs

"Immigrant entrepreneurs' companies employed 450,000 workers and generated USD 52 billion in sales in 2005, according to the survey."

logiclife
01-04-2007, 11:46 AM
MSNBC picked it up too from associated press...

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16459952/

virtual55
01-04-2007, 11:54 AM
By Krissah Williams
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, January 4, 2007; Page D05

About 25 percent of the technology and engineering companies launched in the past decade had at least one foreign-born founder, according to a study released yesterday that throws new information into the debate over foreign workers who arrive in the United States on specialty visas.

The report, based on telephone surveys with 2,054 companies and projections by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley and at Duke University, found that immigrants -- mostly from India and China -- helped start hundreds of companies with estimated sales of nearly $50 billion. It was written by a former technology executive who was an immigrant himself.



Information Management Consultants of Reston also has offices in Pune, India, shown above, with 125 employees. Sudhakar V. Shenoy, an Indian immigrant, founded IMC in the early 1980s. (By Andrea Bruce -- The Washington Post)
Technology-industry lobbyists have already cited the study in a push to persuade Congress to increase the annual allotment of H-1B visas, which allow U.S. companies to sponsor temporary workers in specialty occupations, such as computer programming and systems analysis. The companies say they cannot find enough Americans to fill jobs; other proponents contend that globalization requires U.S. companies to import talented workers.

"This research shows that immigrants have become a significant driving force in the creation of new businesses and intellectual property in the U.S. -- and that their contributions have increased over the past decade," wrote Vivek Wadhwa, the study's author, who immigrated from India with his family as a young man.

Another study will be released next month by the Center for Immigration Studies, which supports low levels of immigration. That report says most specialty visa holders come to the United States to do low-level professional jobs for relatively low pay.

Wadhwa's study looked at founders of engineering and technology companies started from 1995 to 2005, and analyzed the World Intellectual Property Organization Patent Cooperation Treaty database. About 25 percent of international patents filed in the United States in 2006 were submitted by immigrants.

Scott McNealy, chairman and co-founder of Sun Microsystems, is among the advocates for an expanded visa program, writing editorials, calling members of Congress and supporting political action committees.

McNealy noted that immigrants Vinod Kosla of India and Andy Bechtelsheim of Germany co-founded Sun. The company "created tens of thousands of jobs that have generated billions of dollars in exports and has created thousands of patents and intellectual-property positions," McNealy said. "Why would you have any arbitrary number on smart people?"

Last year, the industry raised the issue in the national debate over immigration reform, but Congress ended its session without acting on the Securing Knowledge, Innovation and Leadership Act. The bill would increase the annual quota on the H-1B visas to 115,000 from 65,000, eliminate green-card caps for some advanced-degree holders and streamline the processing of employment-based green cards. Tech lobbyists want to revive it.

"We are working on that new piece of legislation that will hopefully be a great fix for a lot of our companies," said Andrea Hoffman, vice president of government and political affairs for TechNet, an industry lobby backed by hundreds of technology companies, including Apple Computer, Microsoft and Google.

Those who favor low levels of immigration and oppose expanding the specialty-worker programs contend that foreigners accept lower pay and depress wages.

Jessica M. Vaughan, an analyst at the Center for Immigration Studies, said an increase in the cap would amount to "a subsidy for business because it allows them to bring cheaper labor from overseas."

It is unknown how many of the immigrants who founded technology companies had H-1B visas.

At least two Northern Virginia tech companies were founded by former H-1B holders. Sudhakar V. Shenoy, founder and chief executive of Reston-based Information Management Consultants, immigrated to the United States in 1970 after graduating from the Indian Institutes of Technology -- known informally as the "MIT of India" -- and attending graduate school in Connecticut. In 1974, he was offered an H-1B visa, and a manufacturing company sponsored his green card in 1977. Four years later, he founded IMC, which has 350 employees in Reston and 125 in Pune, India.

Peter Harrison came from Britain on the specialty visa and later became chief executive of GlobalLogic (formerly Induslogic), a Vienna-based software development company founded in 2000 by two men from India, who were also H-1B holders.

The company has grown rapidly and employs 1,600 people in the United States, India and Ukraine. Only a few dozen of them have H-1B visas.

"They are very, very hard to come by," Harrison said. "We are always at a challenge to recruit people."

senthil1
01-04-2007, 11:55 AM
Congress will pass easily even with antiimmigrants support if law or Corporations guarantee non displacement of US workers and preference in recruitment of US workers. Of course H1B is focus for anti immigrants but gcs also related to it it is not passed.


There are many many articles like this. Search in this forum you will find tons.
Congress did not listen to the president, the lobbyist what will this article make a difference.

Our aim is to help IV to get a bill pass not to go into articles that says

Someone says Congress has to pass CIR this year.
Congress is working to pass CIR by early summer.

Our aim should be to help push Congress to give temp relief IV is trying for.

We shall overcome

jonty_11
01-04-2007, 11:58 AM
Problem remains..>The Study at Duke done by an Indian. While everyone knows its true that indians are significant contributors, there is very less recognition from people other than Indians. Call it racism or anything....but that will change sooner or later.

anurakt
01-04-2007, 12:10 PM
Articles are not going to make any diff in our state ....money and members will only make changes in our life. Saying that , articles are good way of adding members but it should have immigrationvoice mentioned in it. Every article we get on our side, we should write to the editor and tell him about IV so that he can further publish IV and subsequently add more members.

virtual55
01-04-2007, 01:57 PM
Bush Looks Ahead to Working with 110th Congress

http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2007&m=January&x=20070103125254xjsnommis0.732815

msyedy
01-04-2007, 02:18 PM
Articles are not going to make any diff in our state ....money and members will only make changes in our life. Saying that , articles are good way of adding members but it should have immigrationvoice mentioned in it. Every article we get on our side, we should write to the editor and tell him about IV so that he can further publish IV and subsequently add more members.

I agree with you anurkat and I wrote the same thing above.
I am doing my best in adding new members.

We shall overcome