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vikki76
03-28-2007, 07:59 PM
Interesting comment on one of old BusinessWeek articles.It strongly highlights power an employer holds over H1-B employee.

http://www.businessweek.com/globalbiz/blog/bangaloretigers/archives/2006/11/us_software_tal.html


"'m not at all surprised that the first few comments on this post have been very skeptical of the skills shortage.

No matter how you feel about the alleged shortage, you have to acknowledge that the H1B gives the employer a remarkable amount of power over the employee's life. The employer bestows the right to live in the United States upon the employee, and often sponsers the employee's application for a green card. Changing employers is not impossible, but it is tricky and perilous.

As an American, I can quit my job and become a contractor. An H1B can't. If my girlfriend decides to move across the country for a new job, I can quit my old job and go with her. An H1B can't. If I decide I'm tired of programming, I can quit and apply to law school. An H1B can't. And, most importantly, if I think I'm talented and should earn well above market rate, I can go into my boss's office and negotiate with the knowledge that I'm free to find a better deal elsewhere. An H1B can't - unless, of course, he's willing to give up on his wait for a green card and return to his country of origin and start all over again.

While I'm not a protectionist in any way, I view the indenturedness of the H1B visa as an affront to everything America claims it believes about human and economic freedoms. No employer should ever have this kind of power over an employee.

Congress is perfectly capably of creating an employment category for foreign nationals that preserves freedom for the engineer who comes to America. They still haven't. Why? Well, the most likely explanation is that the corporations who lobby for this visa *enjoy* this power over engineers. And this, in turn, leads to work conditions that drive America's best and brightest away, into careers in law, medicine, finance, and so forth, exacerbating the very shortage that the visa was designed to address.

Unlike some of the posters here, I'm ok with the existence of skilled worker visas. But any increase should be off the table until basic human and economic freedoms are preserved for the worker. In America, you have the right to quit your job. Period. "