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kaskar
06-19-2007, 02:27 PM
any members planning consular processing in delhi ???
please respond

factoryman
06-19-2007, 02:31 PM
Don't know what the officer will do. Don't tell me I didn't tell you.

COMPARISON OF ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS VERSUS CONSULAR PROCESSING


The purpose of this page is to address the advantages and disadvantages of Adjustment of Status and Consular Processing. There are various factors that need to be considered, including the procedures, the cost, the time and the risks involved in each process.

I. TIME
Generally, Adjustment of Status Applications take about 12-15 months to be approved by the INS. In most cases, Consular Processing takes approximately 6 to 9 months, depending on which US Consulate is chosen.

II. CONSULATE NOTIFICATION
The decision to consular process often turns on the issue of whether the overseas consulate will accept an application without notification from the INS via the National Visa Center (NVC). At present only a handful of Consulates will accept such an application. The usual course calls for the INS to send notice of the approval of the I-140 to the NVC in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, which then notifies the particular consulate.


From time to time, an I-824 is required in order to Consular Process. In these scenarios, Consular processing takes in excess of one year and is almost never a good option. Because some consulates are realizing that the I-824 processing times at the Service Centers are unreasonably lengthy, several Consulates have opted to allow consular processing in their discretion without the requirement of the notification from the NVC. Under this process, the AC I-140 (attorney certified I-140), the attorney directly sends the Consulate a certified copy of the I-140 approval notice.


There are a few things to keep in mind if you choose the AC I-140 process. First, not all consulates recognize it. Second, some Consulates may later switch to an approach where they demand the I-824. Third, some of the consulates who do accept ACI-140 do so only on grounds of hardship, such as the aging out of a child.

III. 180 DAY PORTABILITY RULE
Persons whose I-485s have been pending at the INS for 180 days or longer are ordinarily eligible to transfer to a new employer without abandoning their I-485 Adjustment of Status Application. The rules surrounding the 180 Day Portability are new and can be complex. However, the Portability rule can provide great relief to employees who are concerned that future lay-offs or Reductions In Force may cause their permanent Residency Applications to fail. Because of several liberalized I-485 rules, it usually a poor choice to opt for Consular Processing.

IV. LOCAL ISSUES
Each consulate has its own nuances. Most U.S. Consulates require police certificates for all applicants 16 years or older covering all periods that they have resided in a foreign country. This requirement does not exist in the case of adjustment of status. The consular officers also require a certified copy of any military records, whereas this is not required in adjustment of status applications. The consulate in Manila will only accept birth certificates issued by the National Statistics Office. A person who does not have all the documents at the time of the interview will need to appear for a second interview.


In all cases however, the medical exams have to be completed by a designated doctor in that country. In London, the medical exams are completed the same day as the interview. However, in Johannesburg, Chennai, and Mumbai, the medical exams have to be completed at least two weeks before the interview. Essentially, this means the employee will need to spend approximately three weeks overseas or will require two trips overseas.


In most cases, interview notices are generated approximately 30 days prior to the actual interview. As a practical matter, families need to depart the U.S. immediately upon receipt of an interview notice in order to have plenty of time to complete the medical exam.


In addition to the general procedural differences between the two processes, there are more stringent requirements in consular processing. For example, it is generally easier to obtain waivers of certain medical grounds for exclusion, such as HIV, if you are Adjusting.

V. COSTS
Another issue that should be analyzed is the cost associated with each process. The major monetary difference is travel costs. Plainly, you only need to pay for a flight overseas if you are Consular processing. This can be burdensome and costly where there are several family members.


Another factor that may indirectly affect the costs to the employer and employee is the time that will be required to be spent outside of the United States. During the adjustment of status process, a person can continue their employment in the United States while the case is processing. In consular processing cases, they are required to be out of the U.S. for approximately a month, assuming no problems arise in their case. If problems do arise in their case, they may need to stay overseas longer than anticipated. Alternatively, they could, in most cases, come back to the U.S. but would need to travel to the consulate again for a follow-up interview. Obviously, this adds to additional time away from work and additional expenses. In addition, for employees who have school age children, this would require the child's absence from school.

VI. RISKS
The major factor in deciding whether to choose adjustment of status or consular processing is the risk involved. By far, consular processing is much more risky than the adjustment of status process. First, consular processing provides less opportunity for attorney assistance. In the adjustment of status process, the attorneys prepare the application and file it with the INS. If the INS has a Request for Additional Evidence or any issues in the case, the information is sent to the attorney at which time the attorney can review the issues with the client and submit a response. In consular processing, the consulates do not allow the person to be represented by an attorney during the interview. Sometimes the attorney can stay in the waiting room and address any questions that the applicant has, but is not allowed to actually represent them at the interview.


Second, consular processing involves a personal interview whereas the adjustment of status does not. Of course, any time that there is a personal interview, there is more risk that the applicant will say something unfavorable to his case. It also provides the officer with more time to go in depth into the applicant's immigration history or any issues of excludability. For example, if the employee's job title or job duties have changed at all since the filing of the labor certification then there is more of a chance that the consulate will focus on this issue and could deny the application. In contrast, in adjustment of status the INS does not delve into the exact job duties, (e.g. specific tools, utilities, software) but rather focuses on the job title, salary, and whether there is a continued offer of employment.


Third, consular officers sometimes work with a mindset of distrust because they are accustomed to seeing fraudulent cases. Keep in mind that Manila, Mumbai, and Chennai are high fraud posts.


Fourth, anyone who has been unlawfully present in the United States and is subject to the 3/10 year bar would immediately trigger that bar once he departed the U.S. Clearly, a person in this situation should not even consider consular processing as such as decision would be fatal.


Finally, and most importantly, a denial of a visa at a Consulate post cannot be appealed.

VII. EMPLOYMENT FOR SPOUSES
Spouses can obtain employment authorization while their Application for Adjustment of Status is pending at the INS. They are ineligible for work authorization while their Consular Processing Application is pending.

VIII. CONCLUSION
In sum, consular processing can be advantageous in some situations. However, the decision to do consular processing should be made on a case-by-case basis based upon the particular consulate and the facts of each case. Ordinarily, Adjustment of Status is the better approach.




any members planning consular processing in delhi ???
please respond

pappu
06-19-2007, 02:44 PM
I have been doing research on this and it seems there are many risks involved. You should definately have a backup plan if you intend doing consular processing.

kaskar
06-19-2007, 03:02 PM
My case is already at the embassy since march 2007? Not sure when they schedule interview ?does anyone know the time lines.

sunny1000
06-19-2007, 04:00 PM
My case is already at the embassy since march 2007? Not sure when they schedule interview ?does anyone know the time lines.

Did you check the Embassy website? They post the interview dates for all the applicants scheduled for the following month. You can email them or call them and I am sure they will respond.