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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-05-2006, 06:04 PM
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Default Immigrants in 2005

This newly released USCIS study shows mexico, india, china, phillpines had the most legal permanent residents in 2005.

http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/shared...lPermEst_5.pdf

Looks like EB skilled immigrants were 11.5% of the total LPRs...

If this is the country-wise trend, looks like the priority dates for mexico and india will move very slowly...
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Old 06-06-2006, 09:55 AM
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Its pretty sad to know only 11.5% are EB skilled immigrants. ...
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Old 06-06-2006, 04:06 PM
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truly amazing that the number is so low........ and yet the technology that they produce is ............... cutting edge if I may say so. speaks volumes about all the researchers etc who are here on temp visas awaiting adjustment too.
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Old 06-06-2006, 04:16 PM
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nice post, the numbers for mexico, india and china reflect the visa recapture for EB. so this year the numbers will be lower for those countries. So the annual limit per country for EB3 would be...2000ish...good lord, i might be looking at a 10year wait here, for the date to become current, assuming there are atleast 20k people from 'my' country in line, i suspect there must be atleast 100k in waiting for labor from some... Does anyone have a country wide annual breakup of the people waiting for labor clearance.
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Old 06-06-2006, 04:26 PM
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There is no comparison between the workforces in both USCIS and DOL. Jameen aur Aasman ka farak hai (It is as good as comparing Earth and the Sky). So, don't expect such reports from DOL. If they were that good, they would not have that huge backlog in Philly and Dallas centers.
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Old 06-06-2006, 04:36 PM
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Default confused !

I've read the document posted in this thread and it says they have already RECAPTURED the unused green cards from 1999 to 2004 ! Isn't that one of IV's goals !!

From the document :
'In 2005, the number
of employment-based preference immigrants exceeded the above
limit. This was due to the American Competitiveness in the 21st
Century Act of 2000, which allowed 130,137 unused employmentbased
visa numbers from 1999 to 2000 to be made available to
1st, 2nd, and 3rd preference employment-based immigrants once
the annual limit had been reached. Approximately 94,000 of those
recaptured visa numbers were used in 2005. In addition, the Real
ID Act of 2005 allowed for the recapture of 50,000 unused
employment-based visas from 2001 to 2004, 5,125 of which
were used in 2005."
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Old 06-07-2006, 01:33 PM
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Exclamation

I think they recaptured some but not ALL greencards. Also some recaptured green cards were not used up.

Btw, on another topic, the Anti-Immigrant, Anti-H1B site zazona.com is continuing its rant about the senate immigration bill. They also identified another desi-organization involved in the debate: National Organisation for
Software and Technology Professionals (NOSTOP). Here are their ideas about this issue....

==========================
Sent: Monday, June 05, 2006 6:32 PM

Subject: H-1B Revolt

An organization of Indian H-1Bs is calling for a national sick-in to
protest what they believe to be injustices they suffer while in the U.S.
Their plan is to stage this protest in mid-July. The protest is being
coordinated by Rajiv Dabhadkar, founder of the "National Organisation for
Software and Technology Professionals" (NOSTOP). Rajiv claims that NOSTOPS
is a US based NGO. You can view their website at:

http://www.nostops.org/

This is a list of the injustices that they are griping about:

* INDENTURED SERVITUDE - H-1B visas are sponsored by employers, therefore
if the H-1B loses his/her job they must go back to their home country. This
is often why H-1Bs are considered indentured labor. NOSTOPS wants H-1Bs to
be able to stay in the U.S. if they lose their job even if they have to
take temporary jobs in the interim.

Their gripe has no merit because the H-1B program is intended to be used
for TEMPORARY shortages of workers. If an H-1B loses his or her job, by
definition they are no longer needed in the U.S. Allowing them to stay in
the U.S. puts them in direct competition with unemployed Americans.


* UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS - Since H-1Bs are supposed to self-deport
themselves they can't legally collect unemployment benefits. Not
surprisingly they think they have a right this benefit along with being
able to hang around the U.S. while looking for another job.


* SPOUSE AND CHILDREN OF H-1Bs CAN'T WORK - Spouse and children of H-1Bs
can come to the U.S. on H-4 visas, but they are not authorized to work in
the U.S. That's a good thing because if they were allowed to work
potentially millions more Americans would lose their jobs to cheap labor.


* TAXATION WITHOUT BENEFITS - They claim that about 1.5 million H-1B
workers pay taxes but receive no benefits such as Social Security. There
probably are 1.5 million H-1B workers in the U.S. but many of them don't
pay taxes - so this is a red herring. The H-1Bs that do pay taxes enjoy the
benefits of our infrastructure such as roads, utilities, etc. The H-1Bs
that don't pay taxes are getting a free ride. They probably want some type
of totalization agreement so that the U.S. government will mail them a
Social Security check when they go back to India. That's a bad idea unless
of course you don't care is our social security system goes bankrupt.


* GREEN CARDS - They want more than 140,000 employment based Green Cards to
be issued every year so that it would be easier for H-1Bs to become
permanent residents. I oppose expansions of Green Cards because all it
accomplishes is to allow foreign workers to stay here permanently. At least
if they have temporary visas we can in theory get rid of them!


* H-1B IS SIMILAR TO THE BRACERO PROGRAM - They are right about that, and
it's interesting that NOSTOPS compare themselves to the Bracero program,
which was used to import indentured Mexican workers from 1942 until 1964.
They want the H-1B program to be modernized so it doesn't resemble the
Bracero program. This is the one thing I agree with NOSTOPS on - we should
eliminate the H-1B program for the same reasons we terminated the Bracero
program - because they are nothing less than indentured labor subsidies to
companies who don't want to hire more expensive Americans.

Considering what NOSTOPS has on their own website, it's sort of surprising
that they are calling for a "revolt" since they acknowledge that the
strikes resulted in the termination of the Bracero program.

http://www.nostops.org/newstorms.html

The Braceros finally did get some support from the local
communities and revolted! Some Braceros did strike to
improve their conditions. Soon after, the strike, the
Bracero Program was stopped altogether. This was in 1964.

It's not entirely clear what "revolt" they are referring to. The National
Farm Workers Association headed by Cesar Chavez had various strikes to
support the Braceros, but generally speaking the farmers were able to
thwart attempts at treating the Braceros like human beings. I doubt the
H-1Bs will be any more successful against the likes of our high-tech
corporations such as Microsoft.


The NOSTOPS website does have insight and for that reason it's worth
checking out. This is the same question many of us keep asking. Their
answer is pure poppycock, but the question is valid.

So what kind of education will protect a U.S. software
engineer or biotechnologist from someone who can easily
study the same things, but earns very much less?
Why should a laid-off Java programmer in the U.S. spend
18 months and thousands of dollars getting an advanced
degree in neural network programming, when he knows that
the moment there is significant demand for neural network
techies in the U.S., the top Indian or Chinese engineering
institutes will rush to offer equivalent courses or degrees
at a far lower tuition fee? Who wants to be "transformed"
from an unemployed Java programmer into an unemployed neural
network developer with additional student loans?
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 01:45 PM
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Default Another 'Job Destruction" newsletter

This fella is the Anti-Christ of Skilled, Legal Immigration. He makes it a point to call reporters (such as NPR's Jen Ludden and SanAntonio Express News's Laura Lorek) to "educate" them about H1B and EB visas.

===========================
Sent: Thursday, May 18, 2006 6:59 PM

Subject: Two articles on H-1B, F-4, and organizing

I'm not sure I agree with Andrew Leonard's characterization of myself as a
"militant opponent of outsourcing and H-1B visa immigration." It does fit
Webster's 2nd definition but when most people see the term it has a
negative connotation.

You can write comments on the Salon.com site about the article. There are
some good ones already there. If you don't want to pay to be a member, just
click their ad to watch it, and then you can post comments.

The second article is from the San Antonio Express. I am very happy that
the author mentioned the F-4 visa. She was somewhat skeptical when I first
told her about it only because she has never heard of it. Give her credit
for being open minded enough to listen.

Lorek mentioned that she wants to do a series of articles on this subject.
Send her an email and thank her for what she did, and be sure to encourage
her to do more.

Email for Laura Lorek: llorek@express-news.net

Probably equally as important is to send feedback to the newspaper. Go here
to throw in a good word.
http://www.mysanantonio.com/help/feedback/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +

http://www.salon.com/tech/htww/2006/...ion/index.html

Job destruction update

Why aren't American workers as good as Indian ones at organizing?
Andrew Leonard

Apr. 27, 2006 | When the April 26 installment of Rob Sanchez's Job
Destruction Newsletter arrived in my in box this afternoon, I braced myself
for a fresh jolt of information technology worker outrage. Via columns and
his Web site ZaZona.com Sanchez is a militant opponent of outsourcing and
H-1B visa immigration. And he's not likely to mince words when he feels
it's time to castigate the "skunks" and "sell-outs" he believes are
screwing the American worker.

Today's newsletter covered the formation of Immigration Voice, a lobbying
group that represents mostly Indian H-1B visa holders who are agitating for
the U.S. government to simplify citizenship procedures and issue more green
cards. But although Sanchez concedes that he wondered whether it is even
legal for foreign nationals to lobby the U.S. government (it is), his real
ire isn't aimed at them. Instead, he wonders why American I.T. workers
haven't organized themselves as effectively.

"Why after 16 years of H-1B have American workers failed to organize
themselves to fight for their jobs?" he asks.

"There have been many attempts at forming organizations but all of them are
struggling. In all their years of existence they haven't been able to raise
even a fraction of the money IV has raised in just four months. ZaZona.com
as well as many others are operating on such small shoestring budgets we
are continually struggling just to survive.

"Why do citizens of the United States lack the compassion we are seeing
from foreign nationals that are here both legally and illegally?"

What Sanchez appears to be asking is why there isn't more worker solidarity
in the information technology workforce. It's a good question. Of course,
back in the dot-com heyday, if you so much as whispered the word "union"
around a bunch of programmers you were generally laughed out of the room.
And given the general decline of union power throughout the United States,
it's also a fair question whether any amount of white-collar I.T. worker
organizing would have made a dent in outsourcing or any other I.T.-related
labor issue.

Still, you'd think there'd be a few successful software billionaires out
there who would have the welfare of their brethren close enough to their
hearts to feel like writing a check and funding a lobbying organization or
two, wouldn't you?


-- Andrew Leonard


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +

http://www.mysanantonio.com/business...BVisas.1c12bba
e.html

Some seeking more visas for skilled foreign workers

Web Posted: 05/18/2006 12:00 AM CDT
L.A. Lorek
Express-News Business Writer

While Congress examines tougher immigration law and border security,
technology companies want the government to let more educated and highly
skilled workers come here.

The government's restrictive H-1B policy has led to a brain drain in the
United States and prompted the outsourcing of skilled jobs to India and
China, said Jim Goodnight, chief executive of privately held software
company SAS, based in Cary, N.C.

"Our immigration policy doesn't make any sense," Goodnight said. "We're
keeping out the best and the brightest."

The government cut back the number of H-1B visas to 65,000 in 2004 from the
195,000 issued annually between 2001 and '03. H-1B visas, which let
companies hire highly skilled foreigners such as engineers and doctors, are
currently capped at 65,000.

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, this month introduced legislation to let more
H-1B visa workers in the country. The bill, SB 2691, known as the "Securing
Knowledge, Innovation and Leadership Act of 2006," seeks to raise the cap
to 115,000.

What is Bill 2691? The Securing Knowledge Innovation and Leadership Act,
introduced by U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, seeks to increase the H-1B
visa cap from 65,000 to 115,000. It also exempts professionals who have
earned advanced degrees from U.S. universities and those who have been
awarded a medical specialty certification based on post-doctoral training.
Sources: Sen. John Cornyn and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

"A crucial part of our growing economy is our ability to innovate," Cornyn,
chairman of the Immigration, Border Security and Citizenship subcommittee,
said in a statement. "This bill would help cultivate a system that ensures
these talented people -- and their jobs -- remain here."

Cornyn argues that the bill, currently in committee, is necessary because
the Labor Department projects that by 2012 there will be 2 million U.S. job
openings in computer science, mathematics, engineering and the physical
sciences.

The bill also would exempt professionals who have earned advanced degrees
from U.S. universities from the annual H-1B visa cap.

Another immigration bill, SB 2611, introduced by Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa.,
proposes creating a new international student visa called an F-4. It would
let students who earned advanced degrees in science, technology,
engineering and mathematics stay in the United States to work.

But the government's efforts to increase H-1B visas have met with
opposition from unemployed American technology workers, especially after
the dotcom bust began in 2000.

The H-1B visa increases will flood the job market with cheap labor and
throw U.S. technology workers out of jobs, said Rob Sanchez, a laid-off
software engineer in Chandler, Ariz., who runs ZaZona.com, a Web site that
opposes employment-based visas.

Sanchez said he knows highly skilled computer programmers and engineers who
now work at Wal-Mart's tire center and as ticket-takers at concert halls
because their companies fired them after bringing in H-1B workers. They
once commanded six-figure salaries, and now some of them work for minimum
wage, he said.

"Even if you can get a job in the technology industry, your salary is
spiraling downward," Sanchez said. "Companies basically go for the cheapest
labor possible, which for U.S. workers is bad, because it's never them."

G.P. Singh, chief executive of Karta Technologies, a high-tech military
contractor in San Antonio, applauds moves to increase visas for highly
skilled workers and sees it as necessary to keep the United States
competitive in science and engineering. His company has three workers here
on H-1B visas out of its work force of 380.

"People who offer good working environments and salaries -- that is where
the work is going to go," Singh said. "There is no doubt about it. We need
more technically skilled people in the United States."

William Afendy, who's from Jakarta, Indonesia, may have to leave his job as
a software engineer at Karta Technologies and move to Australia or another
country when his H-1B visa expires next year. He got a bachelor's degree in
engineering from Texas A&M University in 2000 and joined Karta shortly
after that. The federal government requires H-1B visa holders to leave the
country after six years and reapply from abroad.

"It's kind of a bummer that I'm kind of forced to move," Afendy said. "If I
had a choice to stay, I would stay. I moved to the States in 1995, and I
hardly know anyone from my home country anymore. Most of my friends live in
San Antonio."


-----

Imagine what a 'nut' this guy is: On the front page of Zazona.com he says:

The promiscuous "guest worker" immigration programs for work in the United States allow foreign terrorists and espionage agents easy passage into the United States. Given the tragic events of September 11, 2001, all nonimmigrant "guest worker" visas should be immediately halted in the interest of national security.

The creep rants about H1B's and employment based immigrants but he doesn't have a single example to vouch for his preposterous claim above. That's because there is none. Not a single H1B has been involved in terrorism. Nada. zip. zero. The 9/11 hijackers were actually on expired student visas from oil rich arab countries like Saudia, not on "guestworker" immigration programs as he insinuates.

Last edited by sobers; 06-07-2006 at 01:54 PM.
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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 06-09-2006, 03:15 PM
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Default Remember Raj??

Check it out..

http://www.rajforcongress.com/issues.html

Immigration Reform
I am a first generation American. My father was born in India and my mother was born in Ireland. We would not be the country we are today had immigrants not paved the way. We do, however, need sensible immigration reform. I support stricter standards for asylum applicants and additional funding for border enforcement as well as efforts to attract the best and the brightest from around the world.

Raj's a long shot but as a first generation American he could bring positive visibility on our issues. For example, a story on Raj appeared in today's New York Times.
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Old 06-12-2006, 04:56 PM
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Default More on ZaZona Wingnut

Recently many Indian teachers are moving to the US and other countries to teach in inner-city schools and rural schools. This ZaZona.com guy has also vociferously argued against this trend. It is such shame that such arguments are being offered because these newly arrived teachers pretty much do combat duty in a very hostile environment. This point is generally missed both by the Congress and the anti-immigrant lobby.
__________________________________________________ ______
Here is a teacher's tale (from Economic Times, India)

A teacherís tale

K.V. Shashikala, (39), an alumna of Bangalore and Madurai Kamaraj universities, taught for 11 years in Bangalore schools, including seven years in Sri Kumaran Childrenís Home. In 2001 she responded to a teacher recruitment ad in the Deccan Herald inserted by the New-York based Teachers Placement Group for a school teacherís job in the US.

I went to Cleveland, Ohio, in 2002 to teach maths and science to students in grades VIII-X. I was teaching at a school which provides free education up to grade XII. While in class VII in India the average age would be 12 or 13 at most, in Cleveland grade VII students were 15-16 and in my classes of 30-35 they were even older. Most were Afro-Americans.

In these inner-city or downtown schools the threat of physical abuse is omnipresent. Cases of beer bottles being flung about in class, teachers having their heads banged against blackboards and so on are fairly common. In our school a class VII teenager gave birth to triplets. It was the responsibility of the teacher to ensure she got the time to take care of her babies who were in a creche attached to the school.

With much of my time and effort spent on maintaining class discipline, I found myself discharging the functions of a jailor rather than a teacher. The two week orientation training given on arrival was all about how to cope with classroom discipline situations.

With instances of classroom shootings and killings hitting newspaper headlines, all students entering class had to pass through metal detectors to ensure they didnít carry dangerous weapons into school. Sharp instruments such as compasses are banned and for geometry class we had to manage with pictures on OHPs (overhead projectors). Quite often I had to hand students my bangles to draw circles. Because of the acute shortage of teachers I was also asked to train part-time teachers many of whom were construction labour, in maths. Moreover the teachersí degree of involvement with students is minimal. Quite often they switch on their OHPs and go off to the canteen. Very little help is provided to students by way of explanations. Thatís perhaps why my students were thrilled with the Indian way of teaching.

Compared to my yearly pay package of Rs.70,000, the money in the US was good. I was paid $37,000 (Rs.17 lakh) a year and as I shared residential accommodation with other Indian teachers, I was able to save about $16,000 which is quite a lot when converted into rupees. But for Indian teachers there is very little scope to grow professionally. In January this year I returned to India and was lucky to get back my old job of teaching science and maths at Sri Kumaran Childrenís Home. Of the four people in our group, three have returned. Though I havenít officially resigned and am still being invited back, itís very unlikely that I will return to the United States.
__________________________________________________ ____

Quote:
Originally Posted by sobers
Imagine what a 'nut' this guy is: On the front page of Zazona.com he says:

The promiscuous "guest worker" immigration programs for work in the United States allow foreign terrorists and espionage agents easy passage into the United States. Given the tragic events of September 11, 2001, all nonimmigrant "guest worker" visas should be immediately halted in the interest of national security.

The creep rants about H1B's and employment based immigrants but he doesn't have a single example to vouch for his preposterous claim above. That's because there is none. Not a single H1B has been involved in terrorism. Nada. zip. zero. The 9/11 hijackers were actually on expired student visas from oil rich arab countries like Saudia, not on "guestworker" immigration programs as he insinuates.
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